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Cooking a Roast - Your opinion would be appreciated

 
 
Mame
 
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 08:19 am
I recently read of a way to cook a roast and I've never done it this way. I am loath to experiment when cooking for others, so I'd like to know if you've done it this way or think it would work. I have a 10 lb prime rib roast.

You cook it for 50 minutes (5 x #lbs) at 500 deg (covered), then turn the oven off and leave it for 2 hours with no peeking.

Whaddya think? Will this work? This is for medium rare, by the way.

Thanks in advance.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 12 • Views: 16,027 • Replies: 38
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squinney
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 08:28 am
@Mame,
Probably.

The key for me with roasts has always been long and low. 30 minutes at 350, then an hour at 225-250 for a slab of approx. 2 lb. london broil.

For 10lbs. it sounds like the temps and timing would work out about the same. The higher temp early on would be to seal in juices. The extended low temp cook time would be for tenderizing.

If you try it, I would like to know the results. Oooh, and really rub it up with some salt and pepper before you start. Should be delicious.
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 08:34 am
perhaps just an old habit but I always sear my roasts in a skillet before putting them in the oven.
0 Replies
 
mismi
 
  2  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 08:44 am
@squinney,
I'm a crockpot girl - on low 5 hours. I seer it first on all sides. Season put a couple of cups of water in and turn the crock pot on low. Easy - and yummy....

I think that way would work fine Mame.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 08:45 am
The high heat/shgort time is best. it gives you a crispy rind and a nice inside. The formula from a Roasting cookbook is

1preheat oven to 500 (F)

2plate roast on a cast iron roast pan

3 put in 500 degree oven for 10 min per pound

4 turn oven off and let sit for 1 hour for a nice rare to medium rare finish


Obviously this works best with a nice cut like a delmonico roast, but lesser grades work too. If you use a poor cult, first marinate the meast in an acide marinade overnight
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 08:53 am
@farmerman,
I'm using a good roast - Prime Rib. So have you done it that way? Your instructions say 10 min/lb and rest for 1 hour and mine say 5 min, rest for 2 hours.

Too many conflicting instructions! What would you do?

And yes, I will season it and let you know how it turns out, but I need to KNOW if it will be done at dinnertime.
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 09:04 am
@Mame,
I think it will work. And if it comes out too rare... slice it into thick 1-rib slices and take some of Paul Prudhommes blackened steak magic, coat the slices heavily, and blacken them in a hot cast iron pan.

This is literally meat heaven. A little place in Tahoe Vista used to sell these and after a day on the slopes, whoa, they really tasted good. And you don't ruin your expensive roast by trying to reheat the whole thing in the oven.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 10:32 am
I looked up the recipe from Kafkas book. She states that cooking at 500 degrees for 45 minutes flat, then turn the oven down to 325 for another 45 min , then crank it up to 4590 for 15 min. SOUNDS TOO COMPLICATED. SO my method (from Julia Child) has always worked for us.

The high het method sounds risky but isnt, trust yourself. I think tht if you keep it in the oven 2 hours, you are probably doing the sasme cause at the end of one hour after the high heat, my oven is rather luke warm anyway, so maybe your extra hour is just for calming down your meat and letting the juices re-adsorb.

No matter what you do for the post 500degree stage, it is gonna come out like a dream and youre gonna get compliments all over the place.

Id serve with some horseradish or else a worcestershire with some tabasco in it.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 10:35 am
@farmerman,
Okay, thank you. You're inspired me with confidence. I always use Worster (as we call it) and I have horseradish. Thank you so much. I will report back!
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 10:46 am
@Mame,
Just keep my blackened rib steak idea in your back pocket in case it does come out too rare. You'll thank me (and chef Paul).
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 10:53 am
@cjhsa,
Will do, and thanks.
0 Replies
 
squinney
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 10:57 am
I'll bring the twice baked potato's.

What's everyone else contibuting?

See ya around six.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 11:01 am
@squinney,
Mmmm, sounds lovely. Wish you could pop in - that'd be fun.
0 Replies
 
Foxfyre
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 11:07 am
The best standing rib roast I ever ate was roasted in rock salt.
The only time I've seen the 500 degree oven work with prime rib is when it is roasted in rock salt--I have not done it myself but have eaten prime rib prepared that way and it was excellent. No, it was not salty. Have also had prime rib cooked the conventional way in a rock salt/flour cocoon. Found recipes for both--you do not salt the meat when cooked this way but other seasonings of course could be adapted to preference:

PRIME RIB ROAST

Have Prime Rib (such as a boneless ribeye roast) at room temperature. Season entire roast with black pepper and Worcestershire powder all over. Rub it in good all over. (Worcestershire powder at Kroger in spice section.

Preheat oven to 500 degrees. Have a large roaster (disposable) pan. Cover bottom of disposable roaster pan with 1/2 inch to 1 inch deep of rock salt (ice cream rock salt). Sprinkle 1/2 cup hot water over salt.

Place roast on top of salt. Cover completely with rock salt. Sprinkle 2 cups water over salt. Bake in oven 12 minutes per pound for rare; 15 minutes per pound for medium; 17 minutes per pound for well done.


PRIME RIB IN ROCK SALT

10 lb. prime rib roast
12 c. rock salt
12 c. flour
Pepper
Garlic

Rub meat with pepper and garlic. Mix flour and salt thoroughly. Add enough water to make a firm dough. Roll out to 1 1/2 inches thick and mold over roast. Bake at 350 degrees for 3 1/2 hour for medium rare; 4 1/2 hours for well done. Break dough jacket with hammer and remove. (cook 20 minutes per pound).
_____________________________

I personally do them the conventional way just roasted uncovered in a medium oven, basting occasionally with the drippings. Hard to improve on that too.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 11:24 am
@Foxfyre,
Thank you. I read about the rock salt version, too, but I don't have any. I'll have to forgo that one today. I'm going to step out on a limb and try it the 500 degree method and see what happens. I hope I don't get shot. I'm trusting FM and the cooks who provided the recipes on this.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 08:19 pm
@Mame,
Okay, so here's the result. Unmitigated disaster! It was RARE, RARE, RARE! I went in at 5:00 (20 minutes before it supposed to be "done") and put a thermometer in it and touched it. Cool. Uh oh. Not a good sign. Looked 5 minutes later and nothing registering on the thermometer. Uh oh. I now had 20 minutes before serving. I had to saw through the raw roast and microwave the slices. Next time, I would do it for 8 or 10 minutes at 500 deg per pound instead of 5. It tasted great in the end, but my lesson was Never Ever Ever experiment On The Job! Not with dinner, anyway.

This job has been all about roasts and pies... not turning out. Oh well!

And while I'm here, I'll give an update on my daughter. They're still separating but because they can't afford to separate (too expensive), they're still living together. He would have to pay nearly or just over $900/month in child support, PLUS one child's daycare, which is $780/month, PLUS his rent, utilities, food, gas, etc., so they're basically on hold. I think they each bring in about $3,000/month, so he would be left with very little. Anyway, she's going to a counsellor once every so often, has been to a lawyer and a financial manager, and they're trying to be friends. I'm all for creative thinking and have given her some suggestions, but this is for them to work out. She's upbeat but worried about the future (she's a worrier, I am not, so we're on different wavelengths). I say PLAN but don't WORRY about it. It usually all works out. Anyway, that's the update.

And don't ever follow that roast recipe if you have a deadline Smile Big NO-NO!
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 08:36 pm
@Mame,
Ya coulda taken them all out to one of those fast food restaurants.

It was probably great, Mame. The thing I remember about camp cooking was that it always seemed like home cooking. The pan fries at breakfast were unfuckingbelievable; real spuds of course.

Restaurants just don't seem to be able to do that, no matter how much they crow about it.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 08:42 pm
@Mame,
I feel guilty, I almost posted to follow Farmer and Julia Child on the ten minute thing, think I was late showing up.

Hells bells, well, we are learning with you.
Glad you had the savvy to save the day, and
sympathy re your daughter and situation.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 08:55 pm
@ossobuco,
No need to feel guilty - this was my trip. And thanks re the daughter.
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 09:42 pm
@Mame,
Didja follow shooter's backup recipe?

(kurious in Kansas)
 

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