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Nutritional deficiencies-a key role in aggressive behaviour?

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 05:59 am
cjhsa wrote:
Huh?


Look it up.
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 05:59 am
Here's some good info.

http://www.mbayaq.org/cr/seafoodwatch.asp
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 06:00 am
Quote:
Salmon, originally, the large fish now usually called the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), though more recently the name has been applied to similar fishes of the same family (Salmonidae), especially the Pacific salmon, which constitute the genus Oncorhynchus.



Britannica. Longer definitions are to be found in biology and zoology books.
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 06:01 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:
cjhsa wrote:
Huh?


Look it up.


I've been eating sockeye "salmon" for forty years. I don't think that's a very recent change. If scientifically they didn't call it salmon, that's just science being a bit slow on the uptake.
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JPB
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 07:32 am
cjhsa wrote:
I wonder how they get the O3 levels so high in farmed Atlantic salmon? That stuff tastes like mushy crap compared to the real deal, wild line caught Pacific king and sockeye salmon.


This is purely a guess, but I'm thinking that salmon is naturally high in Omega-3s and that farmed fish is more fatty in general than wild fish of the same species. They don't get much exercise :wink:
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 07:41 am
I love wild Pacific salmon, but am happy enough with the farmed, even if it isn't as great. Recently I live in what I consider a pretty fish deprived city, and have been eating fresh farmed atlantic salmon. Gotta say I can't tell the difference between it and the Pacific farmed, whatever the distinction scientifically.
On sardines, I do put them in fish soup once in a while.
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 07:49 am
There is no farmed Pacific salmon.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 07:54 am
I think you're wrong on that, but I''ll double check. If you're right, no wonder I couldn't tell the difference.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 07:59 am
This is just the first article I saw, cjhsa -
(and I remember the labels at my local good co-op market, I thought I wasn't wrong).

http://www.psmfc.org/ans_presentations/EnnisG.pdf
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 07:59 am
I doubt it. The salmon stocks in the northern Pacific are vast enough they haven't resorted to farming, which is considered by many to be an ecological disaster, myself included.
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 08:02 am
That is disappointing, osso. I have never seen "farmed Pacific salmon" before, not even when I lived in California. It was either wild or Atlantic.
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dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 08:03 am
In British Columbia, salmon farming is big business. But it's not Pacific salmon like sockeye and coho that is making it to market from the West Coast. The vast majority of fish raised in Pacific net pens is actually Atlantic salmon, which grow faster and survive crowded net pens better.

We're eating three times as much salmon as we did just a few years ago

Chef Karen Barnaby says to the trained eye and the discerning palate, there is a difference between wild and farmed salmon:

"[Farmed salmon] is a little different in colour and texture ... and more fat. The wild … feels more muscular and there's more snap to it. Why more fat on a farmed salmon? Less exercise - like humans."

Another difference in farmed salmon: their flesh would be light grey if they weren't fed ad additive to give them their salmon colour. Farmers can pick the colour they want their fish to be from a 'SalmoFan,' something that resemble a collection of paint chips (more: Salmon by design).
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 08:05 am
cjhsa wrote:
I doubt it. The salmon stocks in the northern Pacific are vast enough they haven't resorted to farming, which is considered by many to be an ecological disaster, myself included.


Your opnion is opposite to that of salmon farming industry:

Quote:
When farmed Pacific salmon escape they do not compete well in the wild, and do not have a high survival rate. Of the low number of escaped fish that survive, over 94 percent have empty stomachs indicating that their competition with wild salmon for food is insignificant.

Very few farmed Pacific salmon have been found in river systems and farmed fish have been shown to have a significant competitive and reproductive disadvantage compared to wild salmon. Competition for spawning locations between wild and farmed salmon is negligible.
source
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 08:07 am
I am not a fan of factory farming, on shore or off.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 08:10 am
cjhsa wrote:
I am not a fan of factory farming, on shore or off.


I agree, but I was only trying to show that there's farmed Pacific salmon, and quite a lot of it, when you look at the various links.
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 08:11 am
Are there any Pacific salmon farms off the U.S. coast? I don't think so, but now I'm not sure.
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JPB
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 08:26 am
dyslexia wrote:
Chef Karen Barnaby says to the trained eye and the discerning palate, there is a difference between wild and farmed salmon:

"[Farmed salmon] is a little different in colour and texture ... and more fat. The wild … feels more muscular and there's more snap to it. Why more fat on a farmed salmon? Less exercise - like humans."


Hah! Just as I suspected...
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 09:31 am
I can tell the difference between farmed salmon and wild for sure. Just not the different farmed ones. Though of course if they were on the same table at the same time I might be able to.
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 10:15 am
some of the biggest salmon farms are in puerto montt-patagonia .
when we were flying to santiago de chile in march , our seatmate was a canadian fish/wildlife/biologist on his way to conference in puerto montt .
we asked him why the conference was in chile and not in british-columbia . he told us that those farms in patagonia are vastly bigger than any canadian ones .
he also said that when the sign in the fish-shop reads "pacific salmon" , chances are that the salmon comes from chile !
certainly were served plenty of salmon in chile !
hbg


...SALMON FARMS IN CHILE/PATAGONIA...
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 10:57 am
I recently got together with a colleague who'd just returned from China. He said he was told that a significant portion of the world's Wild Pacific Salmon comes from China. (I think hamburger talked about this as well recently)

State of the Salmon - research/government links

Pacific salmon use the waters from Korea to California without regard to borders ...
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