ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2007 02:10 pm
That hanging lamp - I had the exact same lamp in my house in northern california..
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2007 02:46 pm
ossobuco wrote:
That hanging lamp - I had the exact same lamp in my house in northern california..


Yeah, isn't it great? There are only two left though, the rest having been replaced with fluorescent tubes {shudder}. When we looked into buying replicas they were $99 each (we needed six) and the glass was really thin...so...we got attractive glass shaded lamps from IKEA instead. We're trying to maintain the sense of history in the place but can't afford to go broke doing it.
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Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jun, 2007 05:11 pm
http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o235/taichi_photos/cuttingcedarsfromfoundation2007.jpg[/IMG]

Well, as you can see, the trees that were too close to the foundation are down. (And since chainsaw accident stories are floating about on another thread I'll just say that gloves, eye protection and chainsaw pants were worn.) Mr. TC has a background in forestry and felled both trees beautifully -- landing one between the front of our trailer and the hand pump and the other between the back of our trailer and our recently installed upgraded hydro line. I was impressed -- it could have been ugly! (We're not normally tree killers but these really had to go. Ironically they were planted for some beautification competition between schools years ago -- just planted WAY too close to the foundation.)
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Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jun, 2007 05:14 pm
http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o235/taichi_photos/treelesswestwall.jpg[/IMG]

This is what the side of the building looks like now -- pretty bare. The red squirrels are ticked off too. Luckily there are plenty of other trees on the property for shade and to keep the wildlife happy.
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jun, 2007 05:22 pm
Yeah, that wasn't just close, that was close. Not very good planning on the part of the planter(s).

(Enjoying the pics and unfolding story, thanks!)
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jun, 2007 05:22 pm
We will be heading north again in a week to do some major repairs on the floor (which in some spots is behaving more like a trampoline). For sure those trees didn't help, neither did the blocked air vents we have since repaired, nor the fact that we suspect the kitchen "sink" (no running water, just a sink with a drain) drains out onto the ground below the floor. We may very well have to replace everything right down to the joists. Luckily we're only talking about 600 square feet. (All and any advice gratefully received.) The good news is we opened up a 9 foot square and didn't find any wild animals...whew...
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jun, 2007 05:24 pm
Hi soz! Yeah, the planters were schoolkids. We met one of them (he's retired now and has a cottage nearby). Apparently they won the contest Very Happy
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jun, 2007 07:00 pm
Re: Back to School
Tai Chi wrote:
http://www.pbsbhpp.com/Long%20Bay%20School%20SSNo2,web.jpg

Will be posting asking for advice from any renovators/restorers out there. We recently purchased this 89 year old one room schoolhouse (this is an old photo). It is poured concrete construction with a steel roof (the cupola and bell are gone -- sold years ago to a nearby lodge). As we undo some of the changes made to the building (the school closed in 1962 and it was sold and used as a hunt camp until now) I'm sure to have lots of questions for you handy people out there. Would love to hear from anyone familiar with poured concrete construction.


How exciting!
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Jul, 2007 06:24 pm
So...the last time I posted there was a test hole in the back corner of the room -- this is it:

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o235/taichi_photos/floorremoved.jpg

And another view showing the centre concrete support:

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o235/taichi_photos/backhalffloormissing.jpg
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Jul, 2007 06:27 pm
Neat! Keep the photos coming!
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Jul, 2007 06:27 pm
The trick here was putting in the joists so that when the plywood sub-floor was added it would be level with the old floor on the other half (in case some of it was okay to leave).

Here is Mr. Fix-it bolting the new joists to the old ones on the other side:

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o235/taichi_photos/boltingtooldfloor.jpg
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Jul, 2007 06:33 pm
This is what we found when we cut up the next section of flooring:

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o235/taichi_photos/middlesectionshowsrot.jpg

Now it's obvious why parts of the floor were behaving like a trampoline. Some of the joists were more like joist-shaped envelopes full of sawdust (you can see some of the sawdust on the ground).
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Jul, 2007 06:38 pm
This is so great. Thanks for continuing to include us in the process!
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Jul, 2007 06:42 pm
We managed to get one half of the building re-floored in 16 days, working in stages (one day to destroy, one to rebuild and one to recuperate, repeat Very Happy ). Of course recuperate meant we went to town for more lumber, and to do laundry and get groceries. It was definitely a working vacation. Here is the last section of the floor with the plywood in place (this was a safety issue as much as anything else -- I got really tired of walking the plank!)

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o235/taichi_photos/fronthalfwithnewplywood.jpg
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Jul, 2007 06:50 pm
This last section was kind of tricky and took the longest because of the partition wall. It's tongue in groove fir and not really attached to anything -- basically it's sitting on the floor . On the right you see the entrance (formally the boys' cloakroom), on the left is the pseudo-kitchen (once the girls' cloakroom) and in the middle is the former teacher's room. Because the floor was sagging, the wall was sagging and had to be jacked up level and supported while the floor below it was removed...and...we had to be careful because there is primitive wiring running through and over it. Fun, fun, fun.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Jul, 2007 06:51 pm
sawdust or termite dust? or powderpost beetles? or? I'm looking at all that sparkling fresh wood.

I'd check out that dust before I close the hole up. You might want to use some coats of vile-deterrant stuff on that wood.

I remodelled our old garage as my studio. Some years before, my husband had added a small addition to store my paintings. When I took it apart to move the door and add some windows, I found a few of the 90 year old clearheart redwood studs had termites. I found every one of my husband-added-doug fir studs did. I slathered all new wood with goop, the nature of which I don't now remember. This was in southern california; no doubt pests are different there.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Jul, 2007 06:51 pm
Will you be replacing that primitive wiring?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Jul, 2007 06:55 pm
Oops, too late, never mind...
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Jul, 2007 07:01 pm
osso, I was really concerned about insects too (particularly carpenter ants) but we didn't find any live insects and we have really improved the air flow under the building to combat the damp.

littlek, Mr. Fix-it is a real details guy. He dummied in new wiring under the floor for wall plugs as we went along. Anything the least bit dangerous has already had the power cut off.

We also cut "test holes" in the other half of the building. The way it looks right now, two-thirds of the old flooring can stay -- no evidence of rot/insects. When the two bad areas are opened up (this fall maybe) we'll be able to take a better look at the good area and make sure we really want to leave it (and we'll be able to finish the wiring).

Hopefully next year we'll be able to afford the final flooring -- locally milled pine.
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jul, 2007 02:04 pm
Forgot to say, osso, re: the possibility of insect damage, that we found quite a bit of bark on the ground under the floor. Some of the lumber used for joists originally was rough and still had bark attached. There was obvious bore holes in that bark so those insects were around 90 years ago. We didn't find anything more recent -- just the dampness from lack of air circulation which we fixed. There was all kinds of stuff under the floor which we raked up. We even found one of these:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/4/44/VNickel.jpeg/200px-VNickel.jpeg

a U.S. Liberty nickel from 1868 (in really bad shape).
0 Replies
 
 

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