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Words That are Somewhat Obscure, But Still Quite Usable

 
 
stuh505
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Sep, 2006 07:29 am
Unlike yourself I'm not here to tout my superiority, and it is not my intent to impress everyone with a supreme knowledge of English. As far as my literary reference goes, it is spot on. You are a perfect example of a wormtongue. You have no respect, no honor, and yet you wag your slippery tongue for nothing but slander.
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Francis
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Sep, 2006 07:39 am
Stuh - Such nonsense!..
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DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Sep, 2006 07:41 am
odious  [oh-dee-uhs]

-adjective 1. deserving or causing hatred; hateful; detestable.
2. highly offensive; repugnant; disgusting.
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DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Sep, 2006 07:42 am
snipe

-noun 1. any of several long-billed game birds of the genera Gallinago (Capella) and Limnocryptes, inhabiting marshy areas, as G. gallinago (common snipe), of Eurasia and North America, having barred and striped white, brown, and black plumage.
2. any of several other long-billed birds, as some sandpipers.
3. a shot, usually from a hidden position.
-verb (used without object) 4. to shoot or hunt snipe.
5. to shoot at individuals as opportunity offers from a concealed or distant position: The enemy was sniping from the roofs.
6. to attack a person or a person's work with petulant or snide criticism, esp. anonymously or from a safe distance.
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Sep, 2006 07:48 am
Fabulist (disambiguation)

In its strict sense a fable is a short story or folk tale embodying a moral, which may be expressed explicitly at the end as a maxim. "Fable" comes from Latin fabula (meaning 'conversation', 'narrative', 'tale') and shares a root with faber, "maker, artificer." Thus, though a fable may be conversational in tone, the understanding from the outset is that it is an invention, a fiction. A fable may be set in verse, though it is usually prose. In its pejorative sense, a fable is a deliberately invented or falsified account.

A fable often, but not necessarily, makes metaphorical use of an animal as its central character. Medieval French fabliaux might feature Reynard the fox, a trickster figure, and offer a subtext that was mildly subversive of the feudal order of society.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Sep, 2006 08:00 am
Certainly Evanescence cannot be said to be an obscure word . . .

http://personal.telefonica.terra.es/web/evanescence-fallen/images/Imagenes%20web/index/index.jpg
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DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Sep, 2006 08:03 am
Try using it at the grocery store....
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Sep, 2006 08:04 am
"Excuse me, i don't see the new Evanescence CD in this rack--do you have it in stock?"
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DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Sep, 2006 08:05 am
Cheater....
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Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Sep, 2006 02:48 pm
florid -adj-
1. reddish; ruddy: a florid complexion.
2. flowery; excessively ornate; showy.

Example:
Although his writing style was florid, and his verse no more than doggerel, his enthusiasm for literature transmitted itself to his son.
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dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Sep, 2006 03:01 pm
Houyhnhnms -
a land imagined by Jonathan Swift where intelligent horses ruled the Yahoos,
imaginary place, mythical place - a place that exists only in imagination; a place said to exist in fictional or religious writings
As in, "Do you know the way to Gog?"
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Francis
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Sep, 2006 03:05 pm
Dysteleology - the doctrine of purposelessness in nature...
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Sep, 2006 03:06 pm
When Brandon contends that a word such as florid is obscure, this thread become meaningless.

Not that there was much hope for it to start with.
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Sep, 2006 03:16 pm
churlish: adjective
Setanta does not like to appear churlish. Razz
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Sep, 2006 03:17 pm
Are you kiddin' ? ! ? ! ?

That's a specialty of mine . . . hussy . . .
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Sep, 2006 03:23 pm
Hussy: noun
A loose woman:pejorative of German hausfrau meaning housewife.
Letty is not a loose woman but is not very domestic either.
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dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Sep, 2006 03:25 pm
oubliette -- a form of dungeon which was accessible only from a hatch in a high ceiling. To exit an oubliette was impossible under any circumstances, without outside help. The word comes from the French oublier, "to forget," as it was used for prisoners whom it was desired to forget.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Sep, 2006 03:27 pm
Letty wrote:
Hussy: noun
A loose woman:pejorative of German hausfrau meaning housewife.


Where did you find that explanation Shocked
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dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Sep, 2006 03:29 pm
pool-pah: **** storm or, The Wrath of God.
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Sep, 2006 03:34 pm
etymology:noun
The study of the history of words.
Letty found out about how a word can become devalued over time when the original meaning was simple.

That's how, Walter.
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