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Birthday Invitations Complete With Gimme Lists

 
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 May, 2003 08:13 pm
That's good to hear, Nimh. I have always encouraged my kids to write wish lists. I think it is good for them to imagine their heart's desire and write it out; maybe even try to make it as compelling as possible. The daughter of a friend of ours made a PowerPoint list last year. She's just 10, but had learned how to use the software in Montessori school. It was a surprise to her parents who, as you might imagine, were thrilled. When possible, we try to fulfill our children's wishes, one way or another. It is also nice to have surprise gifts or to be even more generous than they can imagine.
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 09:56 am
Children are drifting in the same direction adults are, I suspect: less choice in how they spend their time compensated by greater choice in how they spend their money.
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Eva
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 02:29 pm
To realjohnboy, a nice pat on the back for helping out teachers. They could use more friends like you.

I've been thinking about what you said...if you really want to help the teachers, why not give them a gift card or gift certificate to your shop so they can buy what they need for their classes without having to spend part of their ridiculously inadequate salaries? I'm not suggesting you give more...just spend the same amount of money on the teachers, and they'll use it to help their entire classes instead of just one student. Just an idea...
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 May, 2003 02:44 am
realjohnboy

Yes, thankyou for being suppportive of caring teachers .... It's hard work with very few pats on the back for it. Very Happy
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 May, 2003 02:14 pm
Very interesting--particularly the side excursions. Thank you all.
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plglaserna
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Jun, 2011 08:21 am
@Noddy24,
This is the first time that I've ever heard of "Gimme Lists"! I guess if the list consisted of toys and stuff, that would be a little okay. But it should be highly optional for the guests if the listed present would be a check.
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sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Jun, 2011 08:27 am
Blast from the past, thanks for reviving it, plglaserna.

At the time I had a 2-year-old, now she's 10 and I have many, many birthday parties under my belt.

There was no gimme list for any of them. There is sometimes an anti-gimme list -- "No gifts please." This has happened more and more as they get older.

If there is no specification re: gifts, I usually ask when I RSVP if there is anything the child is really hoping for/ any gift ideas. That usually brings a disclaimer ("of course you don't have to get her anything, sozlet's presence is enough") and then some sort of specifics ("but if you're looking for ideas, she's really into Zhu Zhu Pets lately.")
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plglaserna
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Jun, 2011 12:50 am
I suppose the "Anti-gimme list" is more acceptable. It is very useful when the birthday person is becoming a "tween" but some relatives still think that they're in kindergarten and buy them children's gifts.
Hahaha! I get that a lot, too. That I don't have to buy a present and that my attendance is already a gift. I didn't ask the parents of the celebrant, though. I made the mistake of asking my nephew (the birthday boy) instead. He gave me a list which contained the things that Santa didn't get him for last Christmas. Smile
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