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Anger attacks common - explosive disorder affects 1 in 20

 
 
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 11:25 am
Quote:
Anger attacks common and U. of C. study helps tell why

Intermittent explosive disorder affects 1 in 20, much more serious than mild temper tantrums
By Ronald Kotulak Tribune science reporter

One in 20 Americans may be susceptible to repeated, uncontrollable anger attacks in which they lash out in road rage, spousal abuse or other unjustifiably violent actions, researchers from Harvard and the University of Chicago have found.

Their nationwide study suggests a condition called intermittent explosive disorder, or IED, is not the rare occurrence that psychiatrists had previously thought. Four to five percent of people in the study were found to have physically assaulted someone, threatened bodily harm or destroyed property in a rage an average of five times a year.

Intermittent explosive disorder is different from the common type of anger most people exhibit from time to time when they pout, throw a book down or walk out of a room, activities that are better described as mild temper tantrums. IED is defined as repeated and uncontrollable anger attacks that often become violent.

"Our new study suggests IED is really out there and that a lot of people have it," Dr. Emil Coccaro, the U. of C.'s chief of psychiatry, said. "That's the first step for the public to actually get treated for it, because if you don't think it's really a disorder, you're never going to get treated for it."

Coccaro was the first to show, through a preliminary 2004 study, that IED might be an unrecognized major mental health problem. He also pioneered therapy designed to treat the disorder involving anti-depressants, mood disorder medications like lithium and cognitive therapy.

The new research, reported in the current issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry, involved person-to-person interviews of 9,282 people 18 years and older conducted from 2001 to 2003. The subjects were part of the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, a governmentepidemiological study of mental health.

Some disturbing trendsRelief turns to remorse

During a rage attack people often feel a sense of relief, but they mostly feel remorse afterward, Coccaro said. They run a high risk of getting divorced, losing friends, getting into trouble with the law and being fired from jobs, he said.

Anger attacks can be reduced with drug therapy to raise the threshold at which people explode or with cognitive behavioral intervention that teaches people how to relax when they feel tense and how to recognize that another person is not trying to hurt them, Coccaro said.

"The simplest coping skill is to get out of the encounter," he said. "If you feel you're going to explode you just walk away, take a timeout."


source: Chicago Tribune, Tuesday June 6 2006 (MW edition), Section 1, page 3.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 1,471 • Replies: 22
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 11:26 am
Quote:
http://i5.tinypic.com/11uvvwz.jpg

source: print version, as above



Related online article: Study: Explosive disorder affects 16 million
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nimh
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 11:28 am
I was reading this article and I must say, what a stupid article that is! I mean seriously how dare they ssay such stupid nonsense, I'll SHOW THEM THE MOTHERFUC_ERS IM GONNA GET YOU YOU SONOFABITVH!!!
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tin sword arthur
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 11:32 am
nimh wrote:
SONOFABITVH!!!

Sonofabitvh? Issues. :wink:
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Miller
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 11:40 am
Would it be better to exhibit a sense of rage or to have a giant bleeding uler .
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Miller
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 11:41 am
By the way, when I read such articles as the one above, I think fo tow things: lawyer's defense during rage-related trial and medications to treat RAGE. Always $$ down the road somewhere....................!
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 11:58 am
Well, when you've worked with such people like I did (as a scocial worker in psychiatric hospitals/institutions), you certainly get other thoughts.
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Miller
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 12:05 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Well, when you've worked with such people like I did (as a scocial worker in psychiatric hospitals/institutions), you certainly get other thoughts.

Then you know, as do I professionally, that most psychiatric patients are thoroughly medicated by several drugs.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 12:18 pm
Very rarely, and then only when starting the medical therapeutical process (and certainly not "several drugs", that's clearly conterproductive).
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Miller
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 12:22 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Very rarely, and then only when starting the medical therapeutical process (and certainly not "several drugs", that's clearly conterproductive).


I assume you're referring to the situation in Germany, because it's not the case in the USA.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 12:34 pm
Miller wrote:

I assume you're referring to the situation in Germany, because it's not the case in the USA.


Yes, that's the only one I know from own experiences ... through work and from personally/privately known patients.
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 01:12 pm
I'm taking this new disease with a grain of salt. Like "Sexual Addiction", Road Rage "patients" can and do control themselves in front of authority figures.

Certainly some people are more inclined to placidity and serenity than others. Many adults have never learned to control their tempers. I'm not sure that medication trumps will power for patients diagnosed with Road Rage.
0 Replies
 
flushd
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 03:59 pm
This pisses me off. And I am being serious. I personally think there is more harm done by labelling everything 'disease' than in just using common sense.

Of course someone who goes off into rages isn't coping well and is going to be prone to other issues. No ****.

I have to agree - this is another excuse to push drugs.

I'll add: I'm someone who has had this problem. They tried to give me drugs. What does that do? You don't learn a damned thing. You simply are too doped up to react in the usual way. Lay off the drugs, and the problem comes back like a horrible rash.

I strongly believe in alternate therapies. We aren't talking about violent criminals necessarily - these are mostly ordinary people with some poor coping skills, issues in their life, etc.

Frankly, I think the only way it can be treated is if the person sees that it isn't working for them anymore and it is a problem. Not really will power: but making a firm commitment to try something new. To learn to be a peaceful person.

Changing crappy lifestyle habits helps too.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 04:04 pm
flushd wrote:
I strongly believe in alternate therapies. We aren't talking about violent criminals necessarily - these are mostly ordinary people with some poor coping skills, issues in their life, etc.

Frankly, I think the only way it can be treated is if the person sees that it isn't working for them anymore and it is a problem. Not really will power: but making a firm commitment to try something new. To learn to be a peaceful person.

Changing crappy lifestyle habits helps too.


It's quite funny for me that you call "alternative therapies" what is regular here ... (and not only with this but which other psychiatric diseases as well: my previous response was meant more generally and not specific to any).
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flushd
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 04:13 pm
Funny, and a little sad, Walter. I would love to see a lot of the so-called 'alternative therapies' become the first line of defence, and treatment. Or at least offered as a viable option by most doctors.
Drugs seem to be the first thing out of most mouths as a treatment plan. And some refuse to work with someone who will not accept the medication.
It took me a while to find a good doctor who had a more holistic approach.

This is may be difficult to answer, but what sort of options would someone with a rage problem be presented with in Germany, to your knowledge?

thx.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 04:54 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:
It's quite funny for me that you call "alternative therapies" what is regular here ... (and not only with this but which other psychiatric diseases as well: my previous response was meant more generally and not specific to any).

Well its not as either/or as that is it? I mean, plenty of drugs being prescribed our side of the ocean too.

Its not that you're put automatically on drugs as soon as you enter psychological/psychiatric support, that's true, for sure. But I know at least four people in my direct surroundings who are or were recently enough taking some pill or other (and yeah, I'm one).

Perhaps the difference is that the drugs are mostly prescribed only in combination with regular therapy, which has the person deal with issues in their life, acquire better coping skills, etc. But I cant imagine that is wholly lacking in the US either. And vice versa, drugs are obviously commonly enough accepted among psychologists/psychiatrists here as a useful auxiliary tool too.

(Funny, when I was in therapy the psychologist talked with me, and I only saw the psychiatrist for the prescriptions. That seemed a pretty standard division of tasks. (The psychiatrist was also obviously sceptical about the use of all that talk-therapy, he was kinda shruggy about often enough, pills will just do it.))

Anyway, just adding this because the way it was described in this thread so far was, US: only drugs, no therapy; Europe: therapy, no/rarely drugs. But it aint nowhere as black/white as that.

(Unless Germany is drastically different from Holland, of course.)
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 05:02 pm
flushd wrote:
This is may be difficult to answer, but what sort of options would someone with a rage problem be presented with in Germany, to your knowledge?

In Holland, extrapolating from experiences around: therapy (with an increasing institutional preference for short/mid-term therapy, focused on problem-solving/preventing skills, over long-term deep psychotherapy); and if that alone doesnt work or the problem is severe, a combination of that and drugs.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 05:51 pm
Meanwhile, better not to talk about situations in regions around here ...

I saw a gripping documentary, God Plays Sax, the Devil Violin, about a Romanian institution where psychiatric patients and mentally disabled people lived, ordered into line x times a day for their regimented intimidating-looking cocktails of pills and otherwise left to apathetically waste in an overcrowded, threadbare place...

And an article I was editing this weekend cites a 2003 MDAC report about four of the new EU countries that "psychiatric hospitals are one of the most likely places where a person will experience human rights abuses and physical abuse".. in fact, just last April the MDAC announced it would take the Czech Republic to court over the use of caged beds in Czech psychiatric wards and institutions (their use has been banned in hospitals, but they remain common in residential homes)..
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 06:00 pm
I know a guy with all those symptoms- -have long described him as "The Fire Ant."
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jun, 2006 06:21 pm
Spousal abusers claim, "She was asking for it. She just made me so damn mad."

Spousal abuse is usually a private, domestic activity--away from authority figures.
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