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Do you think Issac Newton died a virgin?

 
 
Debra Law
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2004 03:03 pm
famous virgins
Most Famous Virgins in History

Some were actually pure virgins, other listed here did not have sex until very late in life [NOTE: Newton is at the top of the list!]


1. Sir Isaac Newton

2. Immanuel Kant

3. Louis XVI

4. John Ruskin

5. George Bernard Shaw

6. Havelock Ellis

7. Adolf Hitler (Had a mistress late in life)

8. Michael Jackson (until his marriage to Lisa Marie Presley)
0 Replies
 
Debra Law
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2004 03:10 pm
On the other hand . . .
But then . . . we have famous people on the other end of the spectrum:

notable or famous people who lost their virginity at a young age:

8 years old
Lasse Braun, with a 9-year-old Italian girl

9 years old
Lord Byron, with the family nurse

10 years old
Billie Holiday, raped by neighbor Mr. Dick

11 years old
Jerry Lewis, with a stripper engaged by his father

12 years old
Milton Berle, with a Broadway dancer in her dressing room
Alphonse Daudet
Jimi Hendrix
John Holmes, with a 36-year-old woman
Anthony Kiedis, with a prostitute (18-year-old redhead Kimberley Smith, procured by his father)
Nelly, with a 15-year-old girl

13 years old
Gillian Anderson, with "a punk guy who has since become a Neo-Nazi. It was awkward, stupid, unadulterated crap."
Drew Barrymore, 13
Annabel Chong, pornstar, with a 28-year-old man
Johnny Depp, with a fan of his group The Flame following a gig
Tommy Lee, with the next-door neighbor
Dave Navarro

14 years old
Asia Carrera, with a classmate in a parking lot
Vanessa Del Rio, in a theater with her 18-year-old boyfriend
David Duchovny, with a 13-year-old girl
Jerry Hall, with a rodeo bullrider
James Joyce, with a Dublin prostitute
Bret Michaels
Evita Peron, with tango singer José Armani
The Rock
Claude Vorilhon (Rael)

15 years old
John Barrymore, with his stepmother
Aleister Crowley, with an actress in Torquay
Veronica Hart, with her 16-year-old boyfriend
Dustin Hoffman, in a darkroom with a girl who thought she was with Dustin's older brother
Jack London, with a girl named Mamie
Traci Lords, with her high school boyfriend
Friedrich Nietzsche, with a 30-year-old countess
0 Replies
 
Equus
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Aug, 2004 10:33 am
ebrown_p wrote:
Out here we had the Shakers, a religious community that insisted on complete chastity-- no sex even in a marriage relationship.

As we say here, they sure made great furniture!


Furniture making was the only way the Shakers could put all that wood to use. (sorry- it had to be said)
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Aug, 2004 11:56 am
For those actually interested in the thread topic, I found the following interesting snippet at: http://www.metaweb.com/wiki/wiki.phtml?title=Isaac_Newton


"Did he really die a virgin and never see the sea? Just how friendly was he with John Wickins (his room-mate at Trinity College, Cambridge for 20 years) and Nicolas Fatio de Duillier (a Swiss mathematician 22 years younger than Newton)? Was he a suppressed homosexual? What about his relationship with his beautiful, gregarious, intelligent, excitable and flirtatious half-niece Catherine Burton? How could such a devout puritan like Newton condone the fact that his aforementioned niece (and housekeeper in London) and his best friend (Charles Montague, Baron Halifax) were lovers?" Details of any relationships are unclear as Newton defaced many letters that may have provided evidence of his sexuality."
0 Replies
 
Acquiunk
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Aug, 2004 09:55 am
excellent link Brandon. I have a nephew with Asperger's, (brilliant in math but very difficult to get along with) and given what I know from personal experience it would not surprise me if Newton was also afflicted with this condition. It is also my opinion that he was also a homosexual, possibly suppressed. As he could have been prosecuted for this, it does not surprise me that most of his acquaintances were reticent about it.
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Aug, 2004 10:19 am
Acquiunk wrote:
excellent link Brandon. I have a nephew with Asperger's, (brilliant in math but very difficult to get along with) and given what I know from personal experience it would not surprise me if Newton was also afflicted with this condition. It is also my opinion that he was also a homosexual, possibly suppressed. As he could have been prosecuted for this, it does not surprise me that most of his acquaintances were reticent about it.

What impresses me most about him, is that he was born into a world in which there was little or no concept of how to approach scientific problems, and imposed order upon it. The paper on light which he turned in to the Royal Society when he was 29 is probably the first scientific paper in the modern sense, containing no discussion of the nature of the deity, general metaphysics, etc., not to mention the fact that it is completely correct. If there is any one human being who forged the association between science and math, it is Newton. I am sure that you are familiar with the Alexander Pope Poem:

Nature, and Nature's laws lay hid in night:
God said, Let Newton be! and all was light.

It is my understanding that when Queen Anne knighted him, she honored him by coming to him in Cambridge, rather than having him come to London.
0 Replies
 
Acquiunk
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Aug, 2004 10:35 am
Brandon9000 wrote:
The paper on light which he turned in to the Royal Society when he was 29 is probably the first scientific paper in the modern sense, containing no discussion of the nature of the deity, general metaphysics, etc.


I've often wondered, if he avoided this issue because in England at that time it was politically too controversial. The Puritan/Royalist split was still very much alive and these issues could still get you into trouble. He later show considerable interest in the supernatural and spent his last years conducting research in alchemistry.

I think the story about Queen Ann is apocryphal . By the time he was knighted, I think he was Master of the Mint and residing in London.
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Aug, 2004 11:46 am
Acquiunk wrote:
Brandon9000 wrote:
The paper on light which he turned in to the Royal Society when he was 29 is probably the first scientific paper in the modern sense, containing no discussion of the nature of the deity, general metaphysics, etc.


I've often wondered, if he avoided this issue because in England at that time it was politically too controversial. The Puritan/Royalist split was still very much alive and these issues could still get you into trouble.

Well, I think the answer lies in the fact that all of his work was direct and to the point, and usually mathematical and with diagrams. He simply analyzed the scientific problem, and left it at that. He had no interest in straying from the subject. Look at "Principia" which is nothing but continuous theorems, definitions, lemmas, etc.

As for being politically cautious, he was not, as, for example, when, early in his life, he led a delegation to King James to protest the latter's order that a degree be bestowed on a Benedictine monk, as part of the struggle between Protestantism and Catholicism.


Acquiunk wrote:
He later show considerable interest in the supernatural and spent his last years conducting research in alchemistry.

I think the story about Queen Ann is apocryphal . By the time he was knighted, I think he was Master of the Mint and residing in London.

He was already Master of the Mint, but I have seen authoritative sources affirm that she made the trip to Cambridge to knight him.

I think that alchemy had a very different meaning in those days than it does now. I believe it involved general inquiry into how earth, air, water, and fire came together to make the observable world, and possibly had religious overtones. I don't think he considered it to be supernatural, but rather the recovering of wisdom about the natural world that the ancients had once possessed.
0 Replies
 
Acquiunk
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Aug, 2004 12:52 pm
That would have been James II. I think it is unlikely that Newton confronted James directly although by 1687 he certainly had the stature in England to do so. Here is a short account of the incident posted in an online biography of Newton.

"When the King tried to insist that a Benedictine monk be given a degree without taking any examinations or swearing the required oaths, Newton wrote to the Vice-Chancellor:-

'Be courageous and steady to the Laws and you cannot fail'.

The Vice-Chancellor took Newton's advice and was dismissed from his post. However Newton continued to argue the case strongly preparing documents to be used by the University in its defence. However William of Orange had been invited by many leaders to bring an army to England to defeat James. William landed in November 1688 and James, finding that Protestants had left his army, fled to France. The University of Cambridge elected Newton, now famous for his strong defence of the university, as one of their two members to the Convention Parliament on 15 January 1689. This Parliament declared that James had abdicated and in February 1689 offered the crown to William and Mary. Newton was at the height of his standing - seen as a leader of the university and one of the most eminent mathematicians in the world. However, his election to Parliament may have been the event which let him see that there was a life in London which might appeal to him more than the academic world in Cambridge".

http://www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/Newton.html

Newton became Master of the Mint in 1699, resigned from Cambridge in 1701 and was knighted in 1703, so he was out of Cambridge by the time he was knighted. He was basically cashing in, free of the University he became very wealthy.
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Aug, 2004 01:47 pm
Acquiunk wrote:
Newton became Master of the Mint in 1699, resigned from Cambridge in 1701 and was knighted in 1703, so he was out of Cambridge by the time he was knighted.

I'll have to assume you are correct, unless I see something more contradicting it. I have seen it stated that she travelled to Cambridge, but perhaps it is a pervasive misconception.
0 Replies
 
 

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