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Edward Rutledge

 
 
Reply Wed 18 Jan, 2006 05:15 pm
I read somewhere about Edward Rutledge (one of the delegates from South Carolina in the Second Continental Congress) fought in several major battles during the Revolutionary War and was eventually taken prisoner. Is that true? Can anyone give me more information about it?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 1,263 • Replies: 21
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2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jan, 2006 11:53 pm
Born to an aristocratic Family in South Carolina, Edward Rutledge was perhaps destined to a life of Public service. He was educated in law at Oxford and studied for & was admitted to the English Bar. He and his brother John were both engaged in the law, and both attended the congress. They supported each other unabashedly, both on the floor and in committee. Edward attended Congress at the remarkable age of twenty-seven, and was no doubt pretty excited to find himself in the company of the most eminent men of the colonies.

He took leave of Congress in November of 1776 to join the defense of his colony. He was a member of the Charleston Battalion of Artillery, engaged in several important battles, and attained the rank of Captain. The colonial legislature sent him back to Congress in 1779 to fill a vacancy. He took his leave again in 1780 when the British conducted a third invasion of South Carolina. He resumed his post as Captain in the defense of Charleston, was captured and held prisoner until July of 1781.

In 1782 he returned to the legislature of his native state, where he served until 1796. He was a very active member, intent on the prosecution of British Loyalists. At times he served on as many nineteen committees. He also served as an elector, in 1788, 1792, and in 1796 when, despite his avowed allegiance to the Federalist party, he voted for Thomas Jefferson. He was then elected to the state Senate, twice, and in 1789 was elected Governor. This would be his last office. His health declining, he was barely able to complete his term as Governor. He died in January of 1800 at the age of fifty-one.

http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/signers/rutledge.htm
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Impressive man, to serve in congress at such an early age, then drop it all to join the fight for freedom. I doubt there is one single person in {higher} office right now that would even consider doing such a thing. This man is a prime example of how great the founding fathers really were.
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Teperehmi
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Jan, 2006 12:38 pm
Interesting...

Do you know of any good biographies of him?
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2PacksAday
 
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Reply Sun 22 Jan, 2006 01:45 pm
None that I am aware of, many of the lesser known signers are only mentioned in books that have all 56 signers lumped together in one volume. I'm sure someone has written something, even if it's a college thesis.

There were four men from South Carolina that signed the Declaration, three out of the four were captured and sent to St. Augustine, Florida. Arthur Middleton, Thomas Heyward, Jr. and Edward Rutledge.

I, and I'm sure most American children, were taught that all of these men in signing the declaration were signing their own death warrents, and would be proscecuted for treason if caught.. Perhaps that's just a common myth, but the British did offer a reward for the capture of several of the more "well known" rebels. This is what makes Hancock's oversized signature so important...so that leads me to believe, that these men were not considerded a major threat, or the Brits were simply unaware of who they had captured.
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Teperehmi
 
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Reply Sun 22 Jan, 2006 02:02 pm
It's kind of funny how they were overlooked then just like they are overlooked today.
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Teperehmi
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Jan, 2006 02:02 pm
Somewhat sad too, seeing how important their part was in history.
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Teperehmi
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Jan, 2006 02:07 pm
I found one! I don't know how good it is but it's called "John & Edward Rutledge of South Carolina" by James Haw.
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2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Jan, 2006 02:41 pm
Good, I'm glad you found something.

I guess you could say they were the "Kennedy's" of South Carolina.
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Teperehmi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 10:26 am
2PacksAday wrote:


I guess you could say they were the "Kennedy's" of South Carolina.


How's that?
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 10:30 am
Yes, Rutledge's importance in history ought not to be overlooked--he was crucial in forcing a legal recognition of slavery into the constitution. Certainly, that should never be forgotten, and Charles Coatesworth Pinckney should be remembered for the same reason.
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Teperehmi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 01:20 pm
Sarcasm?
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 01:23 pm
I would have been disappointed has you not noticed . . .
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Teperehmi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 01:29 pm
I suspect, Setanta, that we will never agree on many, many things. This is one of them.
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2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 04:24 pm
Teperehmi...I was refering to Jack and Bobby Kennedy...another powerful political duo who were brothers.
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Teperehmi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 04:25 pm
Oh, okay. Thanks for explaining.
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Setanta
 
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Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 04:54 pm
Teperehmi wrote:
I suspect, Setanta, that we will never agree on many, many things. This is one of them.


You don't agree that i would have been disappointed had you not noticed the sarcasm? How very odd you are . . .
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Teperehmi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 07:34 pm
Hehe. Sorry, I should have been more specific. I guess that's what I get for responding in a hurry. What I meant was that I think and/or feel (depending on which ever one you prefer) that it is important to remember such people as Edward Rutledge for their roles in history even if the role isn't a very good one. Or something like that.

Though I must say that I do agree with you that you would have been disappointed had I not noticed the sarcasm. And I do find myself being called odd at least twice a day. That's what I get for unplugging my phone and canceling all plans for a two hour PBS special on John Adams.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 07:36 pm
Why would you cancel your plans for a two hour PBS special on John Adams--i would think that would be something you would want to watch. How very, very odd you are.
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Teperehmi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 07:41 pm
Hehe! Dang it, Setanta, you keep making me laugh!

I don't intend to cancel plans FOR a two hour PBS special on John Adams. I meant (and should have written) that the plans I intend to cancel are all plans not pertaining to that aforementioned two hour PBS special on John Adams.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 07:45 pm
Which, of course, i understood. However, i'm a sucker for a straight line.

To my way of thinking, although there is an interest for the student or specialist in the military career of Rutledge, it is not of any great significance in American history. The unrelenting obstructionism of Rutledge and Pinckney unless slavery were institutionally established within the text of the Constitution is the only thing which makes Rutledge important to American history--Pinckney deserves some small additional mention for the diplomatic missions which he undertook.
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