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Dutch language help please.

 
 
lmur
 
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2006 07:10 pm
Could someone please provide me with a translation for:

"Welcome back! Hope you enjoyed your holiday."

I'm playing online chess with a Dutch national & would like to greet him in his native language when he returns.

Thanks!
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2006 07:14 pm
We've had a couple of Dutch members, but i haven't seen them in a while, with the exception of Nimh . . . i suspect he'll show up soon enough with answer for you . . . just be patient . . .
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lmur
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2006 07:44 pm
Thanks, "Artist-later-to-be-known-as-Hound-of-Ulster".

Hope Walter sees it tomorrow. I think he speaks Dutch as well.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2006 12:31 am
I'm sure, I would understand the sentences in Dutch, if someone addresses them to me - but my active Dutch is rather rudimental :wink:
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lmur
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2006 09:07 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:
I'm sure, I would understand the sentences in Dutch, if someone addresses them to me - but my active Dutch is rather rudimental :wink:


Wie Schade!

Thanks for taking the time to respond, though.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2006 02:05 pm
Graag gedaan (with pleasure). :wink:
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Francis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2006 02:15 pm
I would say "Welkom rug" for "Welcome back" but I'm not sure for the other one...
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nimh
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2006 03:20 pm
Re: Dutch language help please.
lmur wrote:
Could someone please provide me with a translation for:

"Welcome back! Hope you enjoyed your holiday."

"Welkom terug! Ik hoop dat je een prettige vakantie hebt gehad"

To finetune formal into cosy, replace "prettige" by "fijne", or for a little more manly-jovial, "goeie" (and leave out "ik").
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lmur
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2006 03:58 pm
Dank u wel, Nimh. Much appreciated.

Can I ask if Dutch pronounciation of "g" is similar to "ck" in English? The word "terug" appears similar to the German word "zuruck".

And doees "hebt gehad" literally translate as "have had"? (hope you have had a nice/fine/excellent vacation).

If you're ever stuck for an Irish (gaelic) translation, give me a shout!
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lmur
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2006 04:04 pm
.. et Francis, merci beaucoup de votre assistance aussi.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2006 04:04 pm
I would agree to both - but a) that's how I pronouce it, b) my way to translate from German to Dutch :wink:
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Francis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2006 04:05 pm
Mais il n'y pas de quoi, mon ami!
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nimh
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2006 04:06 pm
lmur wrote:
Dank u wel, Nimh. Much appreciated.

Can I ask if Dutch pronounciation of "g" is similar to "ck" in English? The word "terug" appears similar to the German word "zuruck".

Noo... the "g" in Dutch is what English-speakers have so much trouble saying ... I dont think you have it in English (they dont have it in German either). But it's similar to that much-used guttural sound in Arabic and Hebrew, as in the "h" in "habibi", just harder/harsher.

lmur wrote:
And doees "hebt gehad" literally translate as "have had"?

Yep
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2006 04:18 pm
Terug is the very same - both written and spoken - in Westphalian (lower German) [kum terug - come back, for instance]
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lmur
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2006 04:54 pm
Than(guttural sounding "ks") Nimh.
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lmur
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2006 05:09 pm
Walter - I spent some time in Germany some years ago.
I "worked" here for about six months.

http://tinypic.com/jtusz8.jpg


It's the Rathaus in Bielefeld. There was an Irish pub in the Ratskeller.

Had some good times there!
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Jan, 2006 01:02 am
We went to the Bielefeld opera frequently at school. (Besides Detmold and Dortmund, giving us some culture.)

The Ratskeller was frequently used instead, or before/afterwards.

Looked like this in those days
http://www.greuel.de/Fotos23/23222.jpg

and not like that is today
http://www.owl-go.de/fotos/albums/alter_ratskeller_bielefeld_samstag_25032005/thumb_alter_ratskeller_bielefeld_samstag_25032005_IMG_4013.jpg

:wink:
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lmur
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Jan, 2006 06:23 am
You can always rely on the Irish to demonstrate the true meaning of culture. Cool
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Dutchy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Jan, 2006 03:03 pm
Hi lmur

Why didn't you ask me in the first place? I'm not only a cruciverbalist but have other hidden talents as well. Smile

Regards Dutchy
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lmur
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Jan, 2006 03:13 pm
Dutchy wrote:
Hi lmur

Why didn't you ask me in the first place? I'm not only a cruciverbalist but have other hidden talents as well. Smile

Regards Dutchy


Hi Dutchy,

Your cyber-name should have been a giveaway, but I didn't make the connection!
The paddies were sent to Van Dieman's Land for sheep- & bread stealin'. What's the Dutchmans' excuse? Razz
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