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Denver Bans Pit Bulls

 
 
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2005 07:27 am
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,163176,00.html

Quote:
Denver's ban applies to any dog that looks like a pit bull. The animal's actual behavior does not matter.


I don't know many apartments or communities that allow pitbulls anymore either (at least in central tx where I'm from).
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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 8,233 • Replies: 156
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2005 08:27 am
I think this is blaming the dog for the owner's stupidity.

Pit bulls can be lovely dogs. Sadly, many of the people who are attracted to the breed want an agressive and threatening dog. They raise the dog up to be intimidating.

Stupid.

Sad.

Breeders play a role in the destruction of the breed too.
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2005 08:37 am
Most bite reports I've read overwhelmingly involve Pits, and secondarily involve Rottweilers. Pit Bulls are a very dangerous breed, regardless of the training.

I'll give you a case in point: An acquaintence of mine had the tip of his nose bitten off by his brother's Pit Bull. The dog was his brother's pet, and he'd known it it's entire life. They did not train the dog to be aggressive. One day he was playing around with the dog, when it lunged at him and took off his nose.


Pit Bulls might have the capacity to be lovely, but I'm convinced they have an inherent nature to attack, and when they bite they clamp down and don't let go. I've read too many bite reports, and seen too many pictures of maulings involving Pits to think otherwise.
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2005 08:55 am
Yep. I don't want to be around an animal that is likely to attack after a few seconds eye contact. Don't believe they will? You know how to find out.
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dragon49
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2005 09:09 am
Ticomaya wrote:
Most bite reports I've read overwhelmingly involve Pits, and secondarily involve Rottweilers. Pit Bulls are a very dangerous breed, regardless of the training.

I'll give you a case in point: An acquaintence of mine had the tip of his nose bitten off by his brother's Pit Bull. The dog was his brother's pet, and he'd known it it's entire life. They did not train the dog to be aggressive. One day he was playing around with the dog, when it lunged at him and took off his nose.


Pit Bulls might have the capacity to be lovely, but I'm convinced they have an inherent nature to attack, and when they bite they clamp down and don't let go. I've read too many bite reports, and seen too many pictures of maulings involving Pits to think otherwise.


again though this is then the breeders fault as many times the breeders tend to try for more aggressive dogs. growing up, we had a rottweiler and she was the most loving, sweetest, cuddly dog you could know. she was never aggressive. however, she had puppies and we kept one of them and at age two he became aggressive. now our dogs were spoiled with love, slept in the bed a night, and were showered with affection. we just had a bad dog, unfortunately.

here is where owner responsibility and breeder responsibility comes into play. knowing he was aggressive, we put him to sleep. it was hard, but the right thing to do. so pit bulls and rotty's and even german shepherds get a bad name because owners don't want to recognize when the dog is just bad. these breeds have a higher tendency to bite because we breed them that way and encourage it.

however, i don't think it gives a city the right to ban them completely. ban the owners that are idiots (i wish). the problem isn't the dogs themselves, the problem is people who are proud of their over protective dog and don't do the right thing (how can the dog know any better if it has been rewarded constantly for aggressive behavior?)
0 Replies
 
Joahaeyo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2005 09:22 am
Quote:
(how can the dog know any better if it has been rewarded constantly for aggressive behavior?)


Though I do not think all pitbulls are bad (esp. Rotts), this is not what most people experience. Of course there are the pitbulls people get TO BE aggressive, TO attack other dogs ...sometimes people, and are trained with force instead of positive reinforcement...

many times these are loving pets who have shown no aggression (out of the normal puppy stuff), but InSTIncTIVELY attack because they feel their territory or owner or family is in danger or subjected to being crossed by something unfamiliar.

Also in the case of not being around any animal you can't look in the eyes for more than a few seconds and it naturally taking it as a challenge ....well, Border Collies... are very infamous for this yet are one of the most popular dogs. They are so protective that they have a very bad rate at the pound for adapting to a new owner because they often attach "forever" to their family. The case for every pound I've worked at (3).
0 Replies
 
rhythm synergy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2005 01:56 pm
Pitbulls were banned from the sidewalks here in Toronto without a muzzle. I think that's pushing it a bit. Yea i agree that the breeder might have something to do with it. But when you hear a dog attack, you seldomly hear that it was a terrier or a collie, do you?
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Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2005 02:06 pm
Years ago I prosecuted as case where a young boy was riding his bike in his neighborhood, and a pit bull running at large ran up and attacked him. The dog tore his face open from behind his left ear to his chin. The boy is okay, now, but had to have a lot of plastic surgery. This is a very dangerous breed.
0 Replies
 
Intrepid
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2005 02:29 pm
roger wrote:
Yep. I don't want to be around an animal that is likely to attack after a few seconds eye contact. Don't believe they will? You know how to find out.


Eye contact is a threatening gesture to a dog. ANY dog, not just pitbulls.
0 Replies
 
Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2005 02:36 pm
boomerang wrote:
I think this is blaming the dog for the owner's stupidity.

Pit bulls can be lovely dogs. Sadly, many of the people who are attracted to the breed want an agressive and threatening dog. They raise the dog up to be intimidating.

Stupid.

Sad.

Breeders play a role in the destruction of the breed too.


EXACTLY. Those dogs have natural dominance which, when not trained properly and breed to much can cause aggression. The dogs will protect its owner to the death (literally) and if not trained properly the dog can mistake a harmless situation for one of danger and attack.

Pit bulls need to be taught who is boss or they take over the roll.
0 Replies
 
dragon49
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2005 02:40 pm
rhythm.synergy wrote:
Pitbulls were banned from the sidewalks here in Toronto without a muzzle. I think that's pushing it a bit. Yea i agree that the breeder might have something to do with it. But when you hear a dog attack, you seldomly hear that it was a terrier or a collie, do you?


again, i still think it has to do more with the fact that people who are looking for an aggressive dog and want to build on that get pitbulls or rotts. plus the jaw structure of pitbulls is built to lock onto whatever it is biting...that didn't happen naturally, it was bred. and because of their strength and sense of loyalty, they have been exploited into these vicious dogs through years (and years) of breeding and training. i mean how much damage can a terrier or a collie really do when they have half the strength in their jaw that a pit or rottie has.

yes sometimes dogs are just plain bad, but i think that the breeding that has been done among pits have predisposed them to be bad. actually german shepherds are the most loyal and protecting dogs in the world and they too have a reputation for being mean.
0 Replies
 
Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2005 02:58 pm
rhythm.synergy wrote:
Pitbulls were banned from the sidewalks here in Toronto without a muzzle. I think that's pushing it a bit. Yea i agree that the breeder might have something to do with it. But when you hear a dog attack, you seldomly hear that it was a terrier or a collie, do you?


Pit bulls are terriers. They are generally known as American Pit Bull Terriers.


Quote:
The AKC eschewed breeds called "pit bulls" until 1936, when it recognized the American Pit Bull Terrier under the alias Staffordshire Terrier, named after the miners of Staffordshire, England, who had a hand in developing the breed for the fighting pit. The name was changed in 1972 to the American Staffordshire Terrier to distinguish the breed from the Staffordshire Bull Terrier of England, the ancestor of the American dogs, which was recognized by AKC in 1974.
0 Replies
 
Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2005 03:03 pm
Quote:
As the breed moved to America the names Pitdog and Pitbull Terrier stuck. However, American breeders wanted an animal heavier than the British breed, hence the name American Staffordshire Terrier. This is the breed commonly referred to a Pit Bull.


Source


Quote:
"Pit bull" is a generic and derogatory term that encompasses any of several breeds of dogs or crosses on those breeds. Pit Bull fanciers can be divided into several camps: conscientious breeders of the AKC-registered duo who often deny kinship of their dogs with the APBT; ethical breeders of the APBT who face squarely the slander heaped upon them by ignorant neighbors; and unethical breeders of all three breeds who still indulge in dog fighting or promote aggressive temperaments for illegal purposes. Dog fighting rings still exist--it's only been a few years since a ring with national ties was busted in New Richmond and Blanchester, Ohio--and inner city drug dealers often use the dogs to guard their drug supplies and cash.

To further complicate matters, those who still breed for fighting are not as careful to preserve the dog's strong instinct to bond with humans as the early breeders did. So, today "pit bull" is a pejorative term that strikes fear in the hearts of many and leads to the spreading of urban legends about dogs with locking jaws that exert 20 thousand pounds of pressure, unstable breed temperament, and overwhelming human aggression.

In fact, the well-bred American Pit Bull Terrier is a family guardian and protector; an intelligent and obedient pet; a sweet, even-tempered dog that serves well as a help-mate to handicapped owner and friend to small children; and a healthy, hardy dog that complains little and offers much to his family.

Unfortunately, it has been more important for legislators in many jurisdictions to prove to constituents that they have "done something" about community problems. Spurred on by media accounts of "pit bull" attacks described in lurid detail, these councils and commissioners have banned pit bulls in all their forms from their communities. Never mind that the owners are the ones at fault for harboring a vicious dog; never mind that few of these dogs actually bite people; never mind that the breed and its crosses are not always easy to identify. Just ban them.


Source
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2005 03:05 pm
I have a pit bull who is good with people, but hell on other dogs.

Last month she attacked a Great Dane who happened to turn his eyes towards his dinner--which she was eating at the time. (I told my house guest I didn't think bringing a dog was a good idea.)

Before our old shepherd/collie died (of natural causes) I got to be an expert on breaking up dogfights while on crutches.

Iffy is a dear, sweet, girl with a love of mortal combat. She can't understand why all other four-legged critters--to say nothing of the two-legged critters--are annoyed for hours after a dog fight.

She ignores chipmunks who scuttle under her nose. She won't chase deer. She just fights with dogs.

She was bred to fight--and fight she will. Our house is fairly isolated in a rural area and Iffy stays in our yard. She objects to strangers: meter readers, repair people, delivery men and suchlike until told that they have been invited. She's a great watchdog and a wonderful companion, but requires constant supervision when other dogs are around.

She's had little experience with young children, but I wouldn't trust her with young children, either.
0 Replies
 
Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2005 03:11 pm
Noddy24 wrote:


She was bred to fight--and fight she will. Our house is fairly isolated in a rural area and Iffy stays in our yard. She objects to strangers: meter readers, repair people, delivery men and suchlike until told that they have been invited. She's a great watchdog and a wonderful companion, but requires constant supervision when other dogs are around.

She's had little experience with young children, but I wouldn't trust her with young children, either.


Key phrase here: bred to fight.

She knows not to attack people when you give the ok. If you are in danger, she'd know it and attack. Many dogs, not pitbulls, will do that for their owners.

All dogs need to be raised with children to be good with them. A lab can turn on a child who is annoying them. You just don't know with ANY breed.
0 Replies
 
rhythm synergy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2005 02:55 pm
Bella Dea wrote:
rhythm.synergy wrote:
Pitbulls were banned from the sidewalks here in Toronto without a muzzle. I think that's pushing it a bit. Yea i agree that the breeder might have something to do with it. But when you hear a dog attack, you seldomly hear that it was a terrier or a collie, do you?


Pit bulls are terriers. They are generally known as American Pit Bull Terriers.


Quote:
The AKC eschewed breeds called "pit bulls" until 1936, when it recognized the American Pit Bull Terrier under the alias Staffordshire Terrier, named after the miners of Staffordshire, England, who had a hand in developing the breed for the fighting pit. The name was changed in 1972 to the American Staffordshire Terrier to distinguish the breed from the Staffordshire Bull Terrier of England, the ancestor of the American dogs, which was recognized by AKC in 1974.


Thanks. I didn't know that
0 Replies
 
dragon49
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2005 03:33 pm
Bella Dea wrote:
All dogs need to be raised with children to be good with them. A lab can turn on a child who is annoying them. You just don't know with ANY breed.


i watched my parents lab growl and nip at my best friend's baby. because she was petting him (she wasnt grabbing him hard or anything like that just petting sweetly). true he is blind and probably didn't realize what was going on, but again you never can tell. and while it was a nip it was enough for us to move him to the other room and shut the door while she was there. now my nephew is staying there while my brother and sis-in-law await closing on their house and he has growled at my 17 mo old nephew. and this is a LAB supposedly the sweet loving doting dogs of the world. and he is spoiled rotten, of course we got him at age 1 from a rescue so it is possible he was treated badly before, but now he gets to sleep in the bed, eats on comman (at 8am and 630pm everyday), all he has to do is bark and the door gets opened for him, spoiled rotten and much loved. but still growled, bella's right, you never know especially if they have never been around a baby.

bernie, my brittany spaniel, on the other hand took another approach, pinning my nephew to the wall whilst humping him. like i said, you just never know... Laughing
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2005 04:12 pm
Any breed of dog is liable to nip or bite at any time, particularly if prevoked. Of course many dogs would NEVER do that, even if provoked. But nipping is quite a different thing from mauling. That's what you are likely to get if a pit bull attacks ... not a warning nip or bite, but a full-scale, potentially lethal assault.
0 Replies
 
kickycan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2005 04:16 pm
I agree with Tico.

Holy ****, did I just say that?
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2005 04:25 pm
It was bound to happen sooner or later, Kicky.
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