22
   

Monitoring Biden and other Contemporary Events

 
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Nov, 2021 01:11 pm
@edgarblythe,
Not a bit of it. Sometimes, we need to be aware of bad things, too.

My position on Medicare is that I paid into it from the day it became effective till the day I retired. In fact, I'm still paying into it as a SS deduction. It's not a gift. It's my money.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Nov, 2021 02:57 pm
@roger,
Apologists just ignore these things hoping it will go away.
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Tue 30 Nov, 2021 07:03 pm
@edgarblythe,
https://i.imgur.com/LcCxOVd.png
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Wed 1 Dec, 2021 03:17 am
@blatham,
Quote:
I certainly recall that name but not sure if same fellow.


This guy:

Quote:
My Profile

The Tantor is an American patriot dedicated to the promotion of Conservative Good over Liberal Evil. I have served in the Air Force as a navigator / weapon systems officer on F-4E Phantom fighters. After years of experience and reading I can say conclusively that the Air Force is the best managed organization in the history of the world. Since the Air Force, I have worked as a computer guy doing computer things for computer shops in Texas and now the DC area.

I recommend that you buy only Tantor Brand political thought for a happier and healthier life. I guarantee that Tantor Brand will make you handsomer, taller, more energetic, more full of self-esteem, and a swinging winner with chicks everywhere. Accept no substitutes.

Sun 8 Dec, 2002 – Sat 13 Mar, 2004

He was a real gem. I remember him from Abuzz; he used to brag about "tantorizing" the libs. I think he physically threatened Setanta and got banned.
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Dec, 2021 07:33 am
@hightor,
I remember him well. He really started started believing his own crap.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Dec, 2021 08:16 am
HCR wrote:
The U.S. economy is booming.

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testified today before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, saying that although the rise in COVID cases due to the Delta variant had slowed recovery, the gross domestic product is still on track to grow about 5% in 2021. According to Christine Romans, CNN’s chief business correspondent, the last time we had that kind of growth was under the Reagan administration forty years ago.

Unemployment is also down. The economy added 531,000 jobs in October, dropping the unemployment rate to 4.6 percent, the lowest rate since November 1969. The recovery is not even, though, with jobs harder to find for Black and Brown Americans than for White Americans.

Meanwhile, the American Rescue Plan is restoring the nation’s basic social safety net. According to Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, food insecurity dropped 24% for families as a result of Biden’s Child Tax Credit, creating “a profound economic and moral victory for the country.”

Powell also noted that inflation is up, from the 2% level for which administrations aim to about 5%. He predicted that inflation will ease as supply chains smooth out and as the administration takes measures at its disposal.

In illustration of what sort of measures those might be, Biden released 50 million barrels of the nation’s oil reserves to combat the rising gas prices that have grabbed headlines. Other nations, including India, the United Kingdom, and China, released some of theirs as well, and the price of WTI Crude has dropped back to what it was in early September. That fix may very well be temporary as economic growth puts pressure on oil supplies.

The success of the Democrats’ measures illustrates the effectiveness of the “liberal consensus” of the years between World War II and the Reagan Revolution, when members of both parties believed the government should promote economic growth by supporting those at the demand side of the economy. That meant giving those just starting out access to resources which they would, in turn, reinvest in the economy, helping all to rise.

The Reagan years reversed this popular understanding as lawmakers claimed instead that the best way to nurture the economy was to focus on the “supply side”—those wealthy people who, officials argued, would invest their money in the economy and create jobs. To free up capital for those people, Republicans focused on cutting taxes.

But while that system never worked as promised, Republicans have come to believe that tax cuts are the most important way to expand the economy. With the American Rescue Plan helping the U.S. to recover from the economic crunch of the pandemic faster than other nations, and with the extraordinary numbers we’re now seeing, Biden’s plan has once again illustrated the power of supporting ordinary Americans.

And such legislation is popular, so popular that, right on cue, Republicans who voted against the American Rescue Plan and the bipartisan infrastructure bill are advertising its benefits to their constituents as if they were responsible for it. Representative Rob Wittman (R-VA) has a new ad out boasting that “Congressman Rob Wittman is Bringing Broadband to the Northern Neck.” “It’s the future,” the ad reads, and Wittman “has helped bring broadband to thousands of homes and businesses. And he will not stop until every Virginian is given an equal opportunity to connect to the future.”

Wittman voted against the bipartisan infrastructure bill.

The headline-grabbing news today, though, came from investigations into the events surrounding the January 6 insurrection.

Early this morning, Hugo Lowell of The Guardian reported that multiple sources told him that Trump had called the “war room” at the Willard Hotel several times on January 5 to talk about how they could stop Congress from counting the certified ballots that would make Joe Biden president. The team at the Willard was led by lawyers Rudy Giuliani, John Eastman, and Boris Epshteyn and Trump loyalist Steve Bannon. Trump called the lawyers separately from the others, trying to keep from jeopardizing claims of attorney-client privilege.

Although those at the war room have maintained that they were acting only on the wishes of state legislators who worried about voter fraud, reports of phone calls from the president challenge that position. Lowell wrote: “Trump’s remarks reveal a direct line from the White House and the command center at the Willard. The conversations also show Trump’s thoughts appear to be in line with the motivations of the pro-Trump mob that carried out the Capitol attack and halted Biden’s certification, until it was later ratified by Congress.”

After the story came out, Trump’s spokesperson said, “This is totally false,” but offered no more information.

The House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol is looking into the Willard meetings. Today, though, it interviewed Georgia secretary of state Brad Raffensperger, the man who recorded a phone call with Trump as the then-president tried to get him to overturn the results of the election. Raffensperger testified for five hours.

Also today, Trump’s former chief of staff, Mark Meadows, dropped his refusal to answer the January 6th committee’s subpoena and has begun to cooperate, providing records and agreeing to be interviewed. Meadows had refused to participate in the process, citing Trump’s order that he stay silent. But after a grand jury found Trump adviser Steve Bannon in contempt of Congress, and as the House considers charging former Justice Department lawyer Jeffrey Clark, who came up with a scheme to overturn the election and who has also refused to answer a subpoena, with criminal contempt of Congress, Meadows has apparently reconsidered his position.

Former federal prosecutor and legal analyst Renato Mariotti notes that this is a good move on Meadows’s part because it means that any future refusals will go to court, not criminal prosecution. Meadows is the highest-ranking official to testify before the committee and has made it clear he continues to expect to keep mum about what he considers sensitive material. Still, his participation will indicate to others that they should tell their stories before someone else’s testimony makes their information worthless as a bargaining chip.

The House committee today voted to hold Clark in contempt of Congress and passed the resolution on to the full House. The committee wrote: “The Select Committee believes that Mr. Clark had conversations with others in the Federal Government, including Members of Congress, regarding efforts to delegitimize, disrupt, or overturn the election results in the weeks leading up to January 6th,” and it expects him to comply with the subpoena. It rejects Clark’s contention that his conversations with Trump were a “sacred trust” and wrote that Trump had not, in fact, tried to assert executive privilege over Clark’s testimony. The committee noted that “the willful refusal to comply with a congressional subpoena is punishable by a fine of up to $100,000 and imprisonment for up to 1 year.

substack
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  0  
Reply Wed 1 Dec, 2021 06:18 pm
Is McConnell going soft on the debt limit? There's a lesson here for Democrats.

Within the next few weeks, we could face a default on America’s debts, triggering an economic crisis with global implications. But whether that comes to pass is in the hands of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) — and he seems to be hesitating on pushing us to the brink.

“Let me assure everyone, the government will not default, as it never has,” McConnell said Tuesday.

Republicans itching to force a fiscal catastrophe to blame on President Biden might say McConnell is going wobbly. Indeed, in a statement, Donald Trump raged that McConnell is getting “beaten” by “Radical Left Democrats.”

But if McConnell is indeed going wobbly, there may be a lesson here for Democrats in how to exert future leverage against him.

https://wapo.st/3rnXI1V
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  6  
Reply Thu 2 Dec, 2021 06:23 am
https://cdn.creators.com/198/315352/315352_image.jpg
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Thu 2 Dec, 2021 09:06 am
Brian Merchant
@bcmerchant
Every so often you get numb to living in generally dystopian times, and then a new wave of the global pandemic hits, a school shooter kills his classmates with a gun his dad bought on Black Friday, and a theocratic court moves to throw out reproductive rights all on the same day
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Dec, 2021 09:12 am
@edgarblythe,
But we need to keep our chins up and keep dog-paddling. They fought hard to to twist things up, we gotta worker even harder to untwist them.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Thu 2 Dec, 2021 09:50 am
@bobsal u1553115,
The only way to get things straight is to pass the kind of legislation that restores our rights. Voting more than any. Ain't close to happening.
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Thu 2 Dec, 2021 10:10 am
@edgarblythe,
Closer to happening than if we'd have given up with 45's election in 2016.

I might be a bigger cynic than you, but I feel a sea change happening, the pendulum is swinging back. I look at the elections in Georgia Tuesday night and know if Georgia can do it, we can do it, too.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  4  
Reply Thu 2 Dec, 2021 10:41 am
@bobsal u1553115,
Generally, I do not like political cartoons. This one, I like.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2021 10:16 am
Nine pro-Trump lawyers ordered to pay $175,000 for sham election lawsuit
Quote:
Nine lawyers allied with Donald Trump were ordered on Thursday to pay Detroit and Michigan a total of $175,000 in sanctions for abusing the court system with a sham lawsuit challenging the 2020 election results.

The money, which must be paid within 30 days, will cover the legal costs of defending against the suit, which were more than $153,000 for the city and nearly $22,000 for the state.

US district judge Linda Parker, who agreed to impose sanctions in August in a scathing opinion, rejected most of the attorneys’ objections to Detroit’s proposed award, but she did reduce it by about $29,000.

Those sanctioned include Sidney Powell, L Lin Wood and seven other lawyers who were part of the lawsuit filed on behalf of six Republican voters after Joe Biden’s 154,000-vote victory over Trump in what officials have called the most secure election in US history.

“Plaintiffs’ attorneys, many of whom seek donations from the public to fund lawsuits like this one … have the ability to pay this sanction,” Parker wrote.

She previously ordered each of the lawyers to undergo 12 hours of legal education, including six hours in election law.

Michigan’s top three elected officials, the governor, Gretchen Whitmer, state attorney general Dana Nessel and Michigan secretary of state Jocelyn Benson, all Democrats, are seeking the disbarment of four of the nine attorneys, including Powell. She is licensed in Texas.

The other three are admitted to practice in Michigan.

Powell could not be reached for comment. Wood said he will appeal the order.

“I undertook no act in Michigan and I had no involvement in the Michigan lawsuit filed by Sidney Powell,” he said in an email.

Wood’s name was on the lawsuit, but he has insisted he had no role other than to tell Powell he would be available if needed.

Powell is best known for saying she would “release the kraken”, a mythical sea creature, to destroy Biden’s claim on the White House.

But baseless lawsuits in Michigan and elsewhere went nowhere.

“There are consequences to filing meritless lawsuits to grab media attention and mislead Americans,” Benson, the state’s chief election official, said in a statement.

“The sanctions awarded in this case are a testament to that, even if the dollar amounts pale in comparison to the damage that’s already been done to our nation’s democracy.”
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2021 10:22 am
Truthout
9 mins ·
The Biden administration rejected demands for a binding international agreement banning the use of so-called killer robots, which have already been used in conflicts to track and kill without a human operator.
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2021 10:55 am
@edgarblythe,
We’ve had these “war technology issues” for quite awhile. In a similar sense, guided missile technology has existed for many decades. Flying a killer robotic clone? Is that a worse evil than flying manned killer weapons? “Takes the worry out of being close” as the commercial used to say. If it was one of us as a commander of troops choosing what you want to use to fight an enemy, would you want to risk your soldier or a robot?

I would love to live in a world without war or war weapons. I’d Love to have an international treaty that all nations would abide by. Sadly, and most importantly, That’s just not realistic or enforceable.

Furthermore, any nation signing such international treaties in this particular political times, would be I’ll-advised. Trust China or Russia, Iran, N. Korea? Not with our well-being or our lives!
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2021 12:04 pm
@Ragman,
The use of drones and robots has increased the civilian death toll significantly. You may prefer bombs by video game, but I don't.
Frank Apisa
 
  3  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2021 12:15 pm
The unfortunate truth is that we humans have evolved technologically to the point where we can destroy all of humanity...before we have evolved philosophically to the point where we definitely will not.

Perhaps every evolving entity in our galaxy meets this same moment in time...and does the unthinkable.

Because of that, perhaps we are the most advanced beings in our galaxy. Perhaps EVERY evolving entity EVERYWHERE gets to this point...and destroys itself.

Perhaps it is just that we have not yet done it...but will.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2021 12:26 pm
I've had some (military) experimental experiences with drones, but naval drones.
'Seehund' (Seal) is a class of remotely operated mine countermeasures drones in the German Navy. Part of the HFG-F1 Troika MCM system, they originally entered service in 1980.

https://i.imgur.com/LBocHzHm.jpg

The minesweeper I've been on (as conscript and later reserve officer) tested proto-types in the early 1970's.

Since they are unmanned when searching, I can understand the advantages very well: I have actively searched for mines myself (and we found several) more often.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2021 01:11 pm
@edgarblythe,
Quote:
The use of drones and robots has increased the civilian death toll significantly.

Civilian deaths in war is hardly a new thing and predates drones by a few thousand years. How many civilians died in WWII? From the atomic bombs we dropped alone? There's a lot less damage to the environment with drones than you'd see if we engaged in carpet bombing or an invasion by armored divisions.
 

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