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the pandemic has been disappeared

 
 
Reply Fri 30 Oct, 2020 07:13 am
blatham used a passive tense here. Does the phrase "the pandemic has been disappeared" mean "the pandemic has been disappeared (by the flick of a magic wand of Trump)"?

blatham wrote:

Hi george. All the best to you as well. Re your comments, I'll just make the observation that the pandemic has been disappeared. That is an omission of some significance.


Source: monitoring Trump and relevant contemporary events
 
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maxdancona
  Selected Answer
 
  2  
Reply Fri 30 Oct, 2020 08:42 am
@oristarA,
He is using the verb "to disappear" as a transitive verb. "To disappear the pandemic" means to cause it to no longer be visible.

Blatham is pointing out that the pandemic didn't disappear on its own, but that [they] have made it disappear (by deliberately hiding it).

oristarA
 
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Reply Fri 30 Oct, 2020 09:28 am
@maxdancona,
That is, hiding is their magic wand?
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
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Reply Fri 30 Oct, 2020 09:29 am
@oristarA,
The use of “disappeared” as a transitive verb is a borrowing from the Latin America Spanish use of the intransitive verb desaparecido to refer to the abducted and murdered people there during the anti-communist/socialist purges of the 70s.
oristarA
 
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Reply Fri 30 Oct, 2020 09:35 am
@InfraBlue,
Is the word desaparecido still in use in English?

I've found its definition in Dictionary.com:
one who has disappeared: used, especially in Latin America, in referring to a person who has been secretly imprisoned or killed during a government's program of political suppression.
InfraBlue
 
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Reply Fri 30 Oct, 2020 09:41 am
@oristarA,
The word desaparecido is used in Spanish. In English “disappeared” as a transitive verb is nonstandard but is gaining in usage.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Oct, 2020 12:00 pm
@InfraBlue,
InfraBlue wrote:

The word desaparecido is used in Spanish. In English “disappeared” as a transitive verb is nonstandard but is gaining in usage.


I don't think that using "disappear" as a transitive verb is nonstandard.

I just did a quick wearch. Catch-22, written by Joseph Heller in 1961, has this usage.

Quote:
She had urgent news about Dunbar.

'They're going to disappear him,' she said.

Yossarian squinted at her uncomprehendingly. 'They're what?' he asked in surprise, and laughed uneasily. 'What does that mean?'

'I don't know. I heard them talking behind a door.'

'Who?'

'I don't know. I couldn't see them. I just heard them say they were going to disappear Dunbar.'

'Why are they going to disappear him?'

'I don't know.'

'It doesn't make sense. It isn't even good grammar. What the hell does it mean when they disappear somebody?'

'I don't know.'

Jesus, you're a great help!'

'Why are you picking on me?' Nurse Duckett protested with hurt feelings, and began sniffing back tears. 'I'm only trying to help. It isn't my fault they're going to disappear him, is it? I shouldn't even be telling you.'


InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Oct, 2020 12:21 pm
@maxdancona,
You're right. It's not nonstandard, it was just uncommonly used up until the South American purges of the 70's. A blog quotes an OED example:

Quote:
1897 Chem. News 19 Mar. 143 : We progressively disappear the faces of the dodecahedron.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 30 Oct, 2020 12:25 pm


Quote:
Me dicen el desaparecido
Fantasma que nunca está
Me dicen el desagradecido
Pero esa no es la verdad
Yo llevo en el cuerpo un motor
Que nunca deja de rolar
Llevo en el alma un camino
Destinado a nunca llegar
Cuando me buscan, nunca estoy
Cuando me encuentran, yo no soy
El que está enfrente porque ya
Me fui corriendo más allá
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 Oct, 2020 04:04 am
@oristarA,
It's an idiomatic term to mean that something has been got rid of. The thing or person did not disappear by itself like raindrops in the sun, it was actively disposed of, like the dissidents in South America dropped into the ocean.
0 Replies
 
 

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