2
   

is CFS (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome) a STD?

 
 
Reply Wed 4 Dec, 2019 07:36 pm
Hi...
There isn't enough researchs about that or did I miss something?
is CFS/ME (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgische Enzephalomyelitis) a sexually transmitted disease? Or can be transmitted at all?
There're some falls that CFS/ME has been transmitted in a family between ill and not ill family members. But still there isn't a clear answer about this.

My girl friend has CFS/ME.
I actually just wanna know if I would have some private time with my girl friend, would it be dangerous for me?

thanks in advance
 
maxdancona
 
  2  
Reply Wed 4 Dec, 2019 08:26 pm
@greenfire,
You can do the google search as well as I can (which I just did because I am a little curious). I see no evidence that CFS is connected to STDs. In some cases there may be a connection to mononucleosis.

There are much better things to worry about.

glitterbag
 
  4  
Reply Wed 4 Dec, 2019 09:16 pm
@greenfire,
No it's not an STD, but her immune system is under attack so please be careful and keep away from her if you have a cold or any other sort of illness.

I did have CFS and finally had to retire because of the overwhelming exhaustion. I was lucky, because the CFS lifted after 13 years. Some people never get over it, like Laura Hillenbrand the woman who wrote 'SeaBiscuit'. She got sick while she was in college and had to drop out of school...you should check out her story on Wikipedia.

You can't exercise or wish your way out of chronic fatigue. Over exertion can wipe you out for a week. There were times I couldn't stay awake or get out of bed for 5 to 7 days. It's debilitating. It's not fatal, and I'm grateful for that....but it takes you out of life way too long
greenfire
 
  0  
Reply Thu 5 Dec, 2019 10:30 am
@maxdancona,
Of course I know I can google. But I think you're somehow in lack of thinking
1. Google does not contain enough information about that topic
2. Someone must create the search entries also for google, isn't it? And that's I'm.
I'm sorry for the world but now you're also a part of this
greenfire
 
  0  
Reply Thu 5 Dec, 2019 10:31 am
@glitterbag,
Thanks for the answer and information.
I promise, I'll keep away if I'm not ok.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  3  
Reply Thu 5 Dec, 2019 10:43 am
@greenfire,
Oh my mistake, I didn't realize that you wanted to be spoon-fed. Would you like all of us to type S L O W E R? You were unnecessarily rude to MAX, he provided reasonable advice, you don't have to thrilled but you don't get to judge as if he is turning in a research paper.

And what is this?

"I'm sorry for the world but now you're also a part of this". That makes no sense at all. I get you are trying to be insulting, but you're coming close to embarrassing yourself.

I'm done with this thread, I wish your friend a rapid recovery
greenfire
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 5 Dec, 2019 12:54 pm
@glitterbag,
I think you didn't understand what I meant by
"I'm sorry for the world but now you're also a part of this"

it wasn't for you
and that sentence has no relation with CFS.
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Dec, 2019 03:10 pm
@greenfire,
Quote:
Google does not contain enough information...


Really?

I put in CFS and several pages of information appeared. And not just about cubic feet square.
Give it one (or two or even five) more try.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  3  
Reply Thu 5 Dec, 2019 05:58 pm
@greenfire,
I know it was not directed at me, you, however you did try to insult another person because you didn't think they dug hard enough for you. I'm not even fond of the member you insulted, but it was was an unnecessary and heavy handed snippy remark.

That's what I was trying to relay. You asked for information, Max provided a decent answer and you should have said thank you or nothing at all.
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  0  
Reply Sat 7 Dec, 2019 09:33 pm
@greenfire,
CFS or CFD is a psychosomatic disorder. It can't be transmitted by any bodily fluid, but I suppose it can be shared through neurosis.
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Sat 7 Dec, 2019 10:52 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Thank you Dr. Finn, where did you get your medical degree?
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Dec, 2019 07:43 pm
@glitterbag,
I didn't. Where did you get yours? In the secretarial pool of the Dept of Transportation?
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Dec, 2019 01:34 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
Yeah, Maybe I was a Donut Dolly in Da Nang Province. And by the way, how is the Rent-a-Cop job going for you? Do you get the best golf cart to patrol the Texas Malls? Just shoot me a note and I'll pretend to contact the Secretary of Transportation on your behalf. Now just go poo poo in your ostrich skin boots.
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Sat 28 Dec, 2019 06:15 am
It’s Time to Pay Attention to “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome”

Quote:
Professional and public debate about myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) has reached a new pitch. A London Times article in August described the “acrimonious scientific row” that’s erupted in the UK now that the US Institute of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, and Centers for Disease Control insist that ME/CFS is not a psychosomatic condition, but rather “a serious biological disease”. Just a few weeks ago the issue was raised in Parliamentary debate, with a long stream of MPs taking a vocal stand on behalf of their constituents with ME/CFS, demanding a new practice guideline that protects access to biomedical care. (To be clear, no biomedical treatments exist at this time. These MPs, and the patients they represent, demand access to biologically-oriented medical support, with symptomatic treatments and testing as indicated.)

For UK professionals in medicine, psychiatry and health policy, this is no minor scuffle. According to the Times, divisions over ME/CFS management have reached the level where one professional referred to another by email as a “disgusting old fart neoliberal hypocrite”. The trouble is that the UK is the conceptual home of the mental health approach to ME/CFS, and proponents of that approach are valued leaders in medicine and psychiatry. More than that, ME/CFS has long served within psychosomatic medicine as the quintessential psychosomatic condition, so a global reversal of opinion on this would shake the foundations of that field. This is no ordinary treatment debate.

Two aspects of this situation are strange – very strange. First, where is the voice of ethics? For decades the public has pursued a vocal concern about access to biomedical care for ME/CFS, while bioethics has remained silent. Now that battle lines have shifted, now that this is a debate among professionals, isn’t it time that bioethics helped to clarify its ethical parameters? The right of access to biomedical care is certainly a bioethical issue, one of very few to receive regular coverage in the mainstream media. Why has this issue seemed undeserving of professional ethical attention?

Second, psychiatrists who originally established the UK’s prominence in this area are, quite rightly, engaging in vigorous professional and public debate at this time. The UK’s practice guideline is now under revision, and discussion of this kind is necessary to move forward. The trouble is that the focus of this debate is far off track – and no one seems to have noticed.

Debates about ME/CFS have long focused on science supporting the biomedical side versus science supporting the psychosomatic side – but regardless of one’s views on that issue, the new US conclusion has greatly increased the risk involved in psychosomatic management. It is possible that the voices of the IOM, NIH and CDC are correct and the 250,000 ME/CFS patients in the UK are suffering from a serious, disabling biological disease. No matter what your views are on the scientific debate, you must recognize that this possibility is far, far greater now than it was in the past, and that means the focus of debate must change.

It is no longer useful to insist that research on the psychosomatic side has been scientifically successful. Even if everyone magically agreed about that, the most pressing question would remain unanswered: is that research strong enough to support the new level of medical risk involved with psychosomatic management? Perhaps it is, but we cannot begin to make that assessment until we form the question. It makes no difference whether biological treatments are available at this time. It is a very serious matter to risk denying access to biomedical care for patients with an incurable disease.

Evidence-based medicine is driven by the effort to minimize medical risk. In the area of ME/CFS, however, it has long been routine for psychosomatic research to proceed as if medical risk can be ignored, as if it simply is not possible that patients with this poorly understood condition are suffering from a biomedical disease. That oversight can no longer be maintained in credible debate and research.

Even in the midst of an “acrimonious scientific row” we must follow the course of evidence-based medicine. Debate about ME/CFS management must now be focused on the risk of denying access to biomedical care for patients suffering from serious disease. When management discussions ignore this issue, they’re not about medicine. They’re about reputation – and when patient care has come to depend on disputes about reputation, medicine is very sorely in need of ethical input.

bmj
0 Replies
 
greenfire
 
  3  
Reply Thu 9 Jan, 2020 06:09 pm
@glitterbag,
Man you have problems...
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  2  
Reply Fri 10 Jan, 2020 10:30 am
@glitterbag,
glitterbag wrote:

Yeah, Maybe I was a Donut Dolly in Da Nang Province. And by the way, how is the Rent-a-Cop job going for you? Do you get the best golf cart to patrol the Texas Malls? Just shoot me a note and I'll pretend to contact the Secretary of Transportation on your behalf. Now just go poo poo in your ostrich skin boots.


Yeah, maybe, but I seriously doubt it. You really shouldn't be implicitly claiming valor and expertise. In your posts on A2K you have "hinted" that you were a CIA operative, a Defense Dept bigwig and now a Red Cross volunteer in a war zone.

As usual, you sneer at a perfectly honest job: Mall Cop, because, I suppose, they couldn't possibly ever come face to face with the perils Superagent G-Bag has experienced.

I'm not a "cop" of any sort, by the way, and have never claimed, unlike you, to be something I'm not, but I would have no problem declaring I was. No job is beneath anyone...especially you.

You also seem to have a thing with feces. It's juvenile at best. If you are going to engage in a war of insults you really, really need to up your game.
glitterbag
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 10 Jan, 2020 03:04 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
You’re a peach.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

What are these bumps? - Question by reallyconcerned1234
Herpes or just pimples? - Question by Derma1234
Other possible diseases? - Question by leeberry
I don’t know what this rash is - Question by Darling23
Did he cheat? - Question by anonymous4992
Clean Misdiagnosed? - Question by paranoid1234
Oral & Rectal Chlamydia - Question by stevejones56
 
  1. Forums
  2. » is CFS (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome) a STD?
Copyright © 2023 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 02/04/2023 at 09:59:24