roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Jun, 2005 06:15 pm
Not even sure about that 1.5g per tablespoon. Most peanuts give a serving size of 2 tablespoons, with ingredients listed per serving - not per oz. No Jif in the house but Laura Scudder lists 1g per SERVING (two tablespoons), with no sugar listed as an ingrediant. In other words, this is the natural sugar content of the peanuts. All plants that grow green from the ground is going to contain sugar. That's what that green stuff does. Makes sugar.
0 Replies
 
Synonymph
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jun, 2005 07:17 pm
Are you questioning my label reading skills, Mister Roger? The Jif label actually says 3 g per 2 tablespoon serving. Translates to 1.5 g per tablespoon, which is enough (for some people) to slather on a slice of whole grain bread. Maybe with some melted dark chocolate drizzled on top...
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jun, 2005 08:01 pm
Oh, very well, Synonymph. You read the label. I didn't know you had done the math and converted for us.

Dark chocolate? Hey, might work. Whole grain? Phooey. I've done a label comparison between Sara Lee's Delightful Wheat and Delightful White: same carbs, same fiber, same fats, same calories. Maybe they should have labeled the feel-good magical ingredients and the wheat would have had the edge.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jun, 2005 08:06 pm
The one thing whole wheat has, that white bread doesn't, is that slightly nutty taste when it's toasted.

Not that I'll eat whole wheat bread.

But peanut butter and honey on toasted cracked wheat, with a piece of cheese on the side ... mmmmmmmm
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jun, 2005 08:43 pm
There's a big difference between "wheat bread" and "whole wheat bread," roger. Are you sure you compared white with whole grain wheat?
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jun, 2005 08:46 pm
It might be a regional thing, Eva. Here, wheat bread means whole wheat/whole grain. If you ask for wheat toast, they're going to give you whole wheat. Gotta beware of that.
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jun, 2005 10:19 pm
I'm talking about packaging, ehBeth. A lot of people assume that "wheat" means "whole wheat," but in the U.S., that's not the case. Our FDA doesn't require it. Often wheat bread doesn't contain the whole grain, and nutritionally, it's not much different from white bread. You have to look at the list of ingredients to be sure it includes whole grain.

(South Beach Diet taught me that, and I checked it out on the labeling. Sure enough...)
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jun, 2005 10:32 pm
Now that you mention it, not sure. I could check the white loaf, but don't drag that wheat stuff home.

Harrumpf! That's about equivalent to "No sugar added." I checked out an apple pie with that label at Wal-Mart and it had more carbs, sugar, and calories than the standard pie.
0 Replies
 
Synonymph
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 07:47 am
If the label says "wheat" bread, it's just brown white bread. Look for "100% whole wheat."

Pepperidge Farm Natural Whole Grain 100% Stone Ground Whole Wheat is nutty and roughly textured and goes really well with peanut butter. It doesn't have that rubbery chewy feel of some inferior whole wheat breads.
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2005 04:39 am
Check out the "fiber" content - 3 or higher is best. Only real whole grain bread with have a high fiber content.
0 Replies
 
 

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