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Does the German noun “Keil” wedge somehow relate to the English noun "keel"?

 
 
Reply Fri 31 May, 2019 01:20 pm
Does the German noun “Keil” wedge somehow relate to the English noun "keel"?

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0d/Wedge-diagram.svg

http://crewtoo.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Ships-Keel.jpg
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 120 • Replies: 3
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hightor
 
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Reply Sat 1 Jun, 2019 06:03 am
@NickTheodorov,
No. The picture depicts the bow of a boat, not its keel.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Jun, 2019 08:35 am
@hightor,
Correct.

Actually, "Keil" was in middle-high German "kîl".

German for keel is "kiel", old high German chiol, cheol, chiel; middle high German kil, kiel. In low German - still used today - it's kel.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Jun, 2019 09:14 am
@Walter Hinteler,
The German "Kiel" and the English "keel" are the same, btw: keel, Middle English kele, from Middle Dutch kiel; akin to Old English cēol ship
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