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THE FRIGATE

 
 
timberlandko
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 12:59 am
http://www.modele.oh.pl/i/p/6372.jpg
GOLDEN HIND

Originally named Pelican, Drake's Golden Hind was a roughly 120-ton displacement, 70' long, 19' beam, 9' draft, 18 gun Galleon, nominally crewed by about 85 men. She was built in 1576 at Plymouth. Typically Galleon rigged, with courses, topsails, and topgallants on her main and foremasts, and lateen mizzen. The ship's renamin' was occasioned through the odd circumstance of the the beheadin' of her master, one Thomas Doughty, as consequence of mutiny. Though Drake an Doughty were freinds, Doughty's actions left Drake, the voyage commander, no choice. Drake moved his flag to Pelican, and rechristened her Golden Hind. A contemporary account of the voyage, written by Francis Pretty, a Gentleman at Arms in Drake's company, briefly mentions he incident, and may be found at Sir Francis Drake's Famous Voyage Round The World, 1580.

Edit - I see my Hind came in behind Set's Hind. I don't mind.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 01:03 am
I'm surprised, Big Bird, that they describe that as a galleon. If you look at the image from the Devon reconstruction which i posted, it more resembles a fluyt, with a narrower hull and cleaner lines than a galleon.
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timberlandko
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 01:10 am
I hear ya, Set - but from my familiarity with naval history, Pelican/Golden HIND generally is considered to be a Plymouth-built English Galleon. Near-contemporary woodcuts of her bear out the designation. So does Samuel Elliot Morrison.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 01:11 am
All the more surprising that he managed to sail the old tub around the world, in that case . . .
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timberlandko
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 01:14 am
Not a real sea-worthy craft, by any means. Smallish, shallow draft, high centerboard, outsized sterncastle - I sure as hell wouldn't to beat through a storm in her.
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bobsmythhawk
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 05:59 am
Golden Hind
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

This article is about the British ship. For the mythological creature see Golden Hind (mythology).


The Golden Hind was a ship best known for its global circumnavigation between 1577 and 1580, captained by Sir Francis Drake. It was originally known as the Pelican and was renamed in mid-voyage 1577 by Drake as he prepared to enter the Straits of Magellan. He rechristened the ship the Golden Hind in a politic gesture, to compliment his patron, Sir Christopher Hatton, whose armorial crest was a golden hind (in heraldry a "hind" is a doe).

A modern replica of the same ship was launched in 1973 and has travelled more than 140,000 miles. Like the original, it circumnavigated the world. Since the 1990s it has been berthed at St Mary Overie's Dock, in Bankside, Southwark, London, close to Southwark Cathedral. There are organised visits from schools, where children can dress up as pirates, and get living history lessons about Elizabethan naval history. The Domesday Book mentions "the tideway where ships are moored" and this is probably what is now called "Mary Overie Dock". Southwark Cathedral used to be known as "The Cathedral church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie".

Deer (mythology)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
(Redirected from Golden Hind (mythology))

Deer have significant roles in the mythology of various peoples.

In paleolithic cave paintings the figure of a shaman wears antlers as the deer-spirit, notably the figure being called "The Sorcerer" in the Cave Trois Frères in southern France. The Celts had Cernunnos (possibly the horned figure on the Gundestrup cauldron) and Caerwiden, from which neo-pagans synthesized the figure of the Horned God. The stag was worshipped alongside the bull at Alaca Höyük and continued in the Hittite mythology as the protective deity whose name is recorded as dKAL. Other Hittite gods were often depicted standing on the backs of stags.

The Scythians had some reverence for the stag, which is one of the most common motifs in their artwork, especially at funeral sites. The swift animal was believed to speed the spirits of the dead on their way, which perhaps explains the curious antlered headdresses found on horses buried at Pazyryk.

In Greek mythology, the deer is particularly associated with Artemis in her role as virginal huntress. Callimachus, in his archly knowledgeable "Hymn III to Artemis," mentions the deer that drew the chariot of Artemis:

in golden armor and belt, you yoked a golden chariot, bridled deer in gold.

One of the Labors of Heracles was to capture the Cerynian Hind sacred to Artemis and deliver it briefly to his patron, then rededicate it to Artemis. Actaeon witnessed Artemis bathing in a pool and was transformed into a stag that his own hounds tore to pieces.

In Slavic mythology and folklore, Golden-horned deer is a large deer with golden antlers which often appear in fairytales. The legend of Saint Hubertus (or "Hubert") concerned an apparition of a stag with the crucifix between its horns, effecting the worldly and aristocratic Hubert's conversion to a saintly life.

Deer are considered messengers to the Gods in Shinto, and have become a symbol of the city of Nara.

It is sometimes thought that stories about spectral deer may be the based upon tales of the now extinct Irish Elk (Megaloceros giganteus).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Hind
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Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 06:59 am
I've just spent the better part of an hour scrutinizing the wonderful pictures and reading the marvelous descriptions of those ships. Thank you for making my Saturday morning truly memorable, Set and Timber.
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 07:59 am
In my grade school history book, the Golden Hind was singled out for glowing praise, making Drake more romantic than Blackbeard, more daring than anybody. I didn't realize at the time how biases could slip inside school books.
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timberlandko
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 11:26 am
Yer weccum, MA; I'm sure Set & I had just as much fun doin' it. Glad it was appreciated.

edgar - you think Drake gets lionized here, you oughtta see the way he's promoted over in Blighty - here he's just a hero, he's a god over there. Laughing
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LionTamerX
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 11:34 am
I have to echo MA here... One of my favorite posts ever.

Takes me back to my youth when I got into an argument with a drunken uncle about galleons and frigates. Luckily for me, my sober, ex-navy uncle had my back .
Kids weren't supposed to backtalk their elders in those days.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 12:02 pm
Set and timber have given already some really good sources.

An online (e-bok) reading might perhaps be of some interest re Drake:

Voyages and Travels: Ancient and Modern. Sir Francis Drake from the 'Harvard Classics'. (edited by Charles W. Eliot, 1909-14).
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Francis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 12:32 pm
Pretty one, this Francis, Walter Laughing


NARRATIVE BY FRANCIS PRETTY, ONE OF DRAKE'S GENTLEMEN AT ARMS
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 12:40 pm
Indeed. :wink:


A rusty nail placed near a faithful compass, will sway it from the truth, and wreck the argosy.
Sir Walter Scott
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 01:20 pm
Walter--

Marvelous metaphor.

Everyone--

Delightful thread.
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Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2005 08:12 pm
Drake's mantle of heroism -- or godhood, if you will -- dates only from the time of the defeat of the Spanish fleet, which came some years after Drake had returned from the circumnavigatory voyage of the Golden Hind. It is probably no exaggeration to venture a guess that there was discussion in the private quarters of Queen Elizabeth whether to knight Drake or to have him beheaded. He had deliberately disobeyed a number of the Queen's commands, had executed a gentleman who dared argue with Drake's decisions and called that disgareement "mutiny" and generally acted as an independent slef-centered bully. In the end, knigthood was agreed upon, but the Queen refused to do the honors in person, or even to personally meet with Drake. She sent a court representative aboard the Gold Hind to dub the skipper Sir Francis.

It was a different story after the scuttling of the Armada, for which Drake -- rightly or wrongly -- was given the major share of credit.
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