10
   

The Hillary wants to run in 2020 Thread

 
 
Real Music
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2018 07:07 pm
@maxdancona,
Merry Christmas.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2018 08:29 pm
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:
How can Hillary Clinton... who attacked the women credibly accusing her husband of sexual assault and (in the case of Juanita Broaddrick) of rape, run as part of the #MeToo movement? She shut down their testimony by accusing them of being part of a political "conspiracy".
This really makes no sense. Hillary Clinton is on the wrong side of the #MeToo movement.
The entire feminist movement said that it was OK for Bill Clinton to commit sexual harassment, sexual assault, and outright rape.

Hillary fits right in with the rest of the #MeToo nutcases because the entire movement lacks credibility.
neptuneblue
 
  2  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2018 10:07 pm
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:
Hillary fits right in with the rest of the #MeToo nutcases because the entire movement lacks credibility.


Really... Then how do suppose this happened (and that's just from 12/17):


This Is How Many People Have Posted “Me Too” Since October, According To New Data
ByJR THORPE
Dec 1 2017

The phrase and hashtag #metoo has been one of the most viral and powerful occurrences in social media history. In case you somehow missed it, the actual "Me Too" movement was first sparked back in 2009 by activist Tarana Burke, and was repopularized when actor Alyssa Milano said on Twitter that anybody who had been "sexually harassed or assaulted" should reply to her Tweet with "Me Too," in order to give a proper visualization of the problem on Oct. 15. The ensuing power of the hashtag continues to be felt, as women and men use the #MeToo hashtag or simply post "me, too" across media platforms to reveal their own experiences, debate harassment culture, and express solidarity and support. How many people have posted "Me too" since October, though, and additional data related to the movement, shows how much the phrase has embedded itself in our culture, and how it isn't going away anytime soon.

Numbers, when it comes to phenomena like #MeToo, are important. They show a lot of different things: how powerfully something resonated, where it found the most audience members, who was most attracted to and energized by it, and what sparked new surges of popularity. This is particularly important considering the enduring taboo around discussing sexual assault and harassment, among both male and female victims. These numbers show what many women already knew: that people all over the world experience sexual harassment and assault, and every culture needs to do something about it.

What The Data Behind #MeToo Reveals

The publicly available nature of some of the #MeToo data — it's on public platforms like Instagram, Facebook and its original medium, Twitter — has meant that it's been analyzed by many different people. One, the multimedia artist Erin Gallagher, revealed in November to ArtNet that she'd produced a visualization of 24,722 #MeToo tweets as they'd spread through different social communities on Twitter. And her results revealed that #MeToo sparked a hugely widespread reaction: 10,709 distinct social groups, or small collectives of people who follow one another, were part of that Tweet collection. The results, Gallagher told ArtNet, included far more communities than any trending hashtag she'd seen before.

The unexpectedly widespread nature of #MeToo is revealed in other data, too. EZYInsights, an internet analysis company, published data around #MeToo that has a few similar insights. The hashtag and its translations around the world have trended in 85 different countries in 2017, and the French were actually discussing a similar idea before #MeToo took off, with a hashtag called #BalanceTonPorc, literally translated "expose your pig," a request for sexual assault and harassment sufferers to reveal their abusers.

Once #MeToo joined the party, it was picked up on every continent, but was particularly heavily reproduced in the U.S., Europe, India and Australia. Tracking the numbers around #MeToo specifically can be overwhelming, because they're huge: half a million people responded to Milano's Tweet in the first 24 hours, and by the end of November, Twitter confirmed that over 1.7 million Tweets had been made with the hashtag or its translations worldwide. Those numbers are still continuing to grow, though more slowly than when the trend first began.

And that's just Twitter. Other social media platforms saw a huge #MeToo trend; Facebook revealed to CBS News that in the 24 hours after Milano posted her Tweet, 12 million posts and comments went up, and 45 percent of all U.S. users had friends who'd posted #metoo. EZYInsights found that Facebook news coverage of #MeToo was more popular in November than #fakenews, Russian hackers or natural disasters. And interestingly, Google searches about #MeToo in the U.S. were most popular in Utah and Idaho, while it was most highly googled elsewhere in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, the UK and Sweden.

It's not fair to use this data to declare specific countries have a "problem" with sexual assault; some national cultures may be more comfortable discussing sexual assault out loud than others, for example. What this does seem to reveal is that it's a seriously worldwide issue, even in places like Sweden and Norway, which have reputations for high levels of gender equality.

It's Not Just About The Hashtag

It's not just about #MeToo itself; data can also reveal what the hashtag sparked in its users. While searches for #MeToo itself peaked in the U.S. in mid-October and have since dwindled, Google searches about the definition of sexual assault and harassment, EZYInsight reports, have been gradually on the rise since October. In our own analysis of Google trends, searches for "workplace harassment" have been on a gradual upward trend since October, too. Some people were also very interested in googling #MeToo alongside "men," but this search was only really popular in the U.S. in New York and California, which indicates that perhaps it wasn't a widespread idea.

The entire point of the #MeToo phenomenon was to make the scale of sexual harassment and assault worldwide highly visible — and it has, in ways that perhaps nobody predicted. Simply visibility, of course, isn't enough — and the fact that this hashtag has encouraged more allegations against prominent male abusers to be made public is a good thing. But the way in which people are talking about assault and harassment is now more open than ever before, and can teach us about the problem in unprecedented ways.
oralloy
 
  -4  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2018 11:20 pm
@neptuneblue,
A bunch of nutcases making meaningless noise? That's nothing of any significance.
neptuneblue
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Dec, 2018 05:26 am
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:
A bunch of nutcases making meaningless noise? That's nothing of any significance.


As more women are running for public office, that's pretty significant for social issues:

Nevada becoming the first state to have women be majority in state Legislature
By DAVID MONTERO
DEC 18, 2018 | 8:55 PM
| LAS VEGAS

Nevada becoming the first state to have women be majority in state Legislature

Starting with its opening session in 2019, Nevada will be the first state in the nation to seat a majority-female Legislature. (Lance Iversen / Associated Press)

Nevada is set to become the first state in the nation with an overall female-majority Legislature when its next session opens in the new year.

The Clark County Commission on Tuesday appointed Beatrice Duran and Rochelle Nguyen to fill two open state Assembly seats. With the commission’s approval, the Legislature will have 32 women out of a total of 63 seats between the state Assembly and Senate.

The additions will solidify the female majority in the Assembly, with 23 of 42 seats to be held by women. Men still make up the majority of the 21-member state Senate, with women holding nine seats.

“A great milestone!” Democratic Gov.-elect Steve Sisolak tweeted after the appointment. In his last meeting as Clark County Commission chairman, Sisolak voted to approve both women for the vacant seats.

Tuesday’s appointments continued to propel Nevada forward as a state that has been especially receptive to women running for — and being elected to — public office. The midterm election in November proved to be a high-water mark for the Silver State.

Jacky Rosen defeated incumbent Dean Heller in the U.S. Senate race, becoming the second woman in Nevada to secure a Senate seat. In 2016, Catherine Cortez Masto became the first female senator to be elected to represent Nevada.

Half of Nevada’s representatives in the U.S. House will be women next year as well; Susie Lee defeated Danny Tarkanian and Dina Titus beat Joyce Bentley.

The Nevada Supreme Court also picked up a majority of women in November, with three female judges being elected to join a fourth on the bench. Nevada voters also approved by a wide margin a ballot question that exempted feminine hygiene products from state sales tax.

State Sen. Pat Spearman, who led the push for Nevada to become the first state in more than 40 years to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment in 2017, said the new female majority in Nevada should be a beacon to other states.

“We are on the right side of history and we will continue to make history,” Spearman said. “For people stuck in the 15th century who still want to promote the idea that a woman’s place is only in the home, I would say if you’re planning on running for office, be afraid. Be very afraid. People are done with that. It’s time to get things done.”

Nevada’s female population, according to the latest Census data, is 49.8%. In Clark County, where Las Vegas is, it’s 50.1%.

Kelly Dittmar, an associate professor of political science and scholar for the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University, said Nevada’s embrace of women in positions of political power may be partially rooted in the West’s more pragmatic view of women pulling weight in all aspects of frontier life.

“You needed women to step in and step up into public roles,” Dittmar said. “Whether it was working on the farm or participating in government.”

The Center for American Women in Politics showed New Hampshire had a female majority in its state Senate in 2009-2010, but no state has had a female majority of both chambers combined.

Dittmar said the states with the lowest concentration of women in their state legislatures heading into 2019 were West Virginia and Mississippi — both at under 15% female.

Nevada has generally had higher representation of women in its state Legislature, with 39.7% being represented by women in 2017, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. The average for state legislatures nationally was 24.4% in 2017.

Assembly Speaker Jason Frierson said in a statement he was proud to welcome two members with a “diversity of backgrounds and life experiences.”

Nguyen, a Democrat, said she was inspired to run amid the record-setting number of women who sought political office this year, but she said that wasn’t the only factor in her decision to seek the Assembly seat.

The criminal defense attorney and mother to two children said issues like education and healthcare were driving forces behind her seeking the seat.

“We can sit there and talk about how we want things to change or want things to be different or better, but I know it was important for me and my husband to show our children that, in order to make a difference, you have to get involved,” Nguyen said.

Duran, a fellow Democrat and a staff member at Culinary Workers Union Local 226 in Las Vegas, said she was honored to be part of a history-making legislative class and that this was a chance “for women being able to show their power.”

Nevada’s legislative session begins in February.
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 19 Dec, 2018 05:58 am
@neptuneblue,
neptuneblue wrote:
As more women are running for public office, that's pretty significant for social issues:
No significance that I perceive.
maxdancona
 
  0  
Reply Wed 19 Dec, 2018 10:47 am
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:

neptuneblue wrote:
As more women are running for public office, that's pretty significant for social issues:
No significance that I perceive.


I question this claim too. Betsy DeVos is a woman, as are Mia Love ans many other people with conservative values.

The idea that women are some homogenous group with the same opinions is funny.

I suspect Neptune would prefer to vote for a liberal man over a conservative woman in almost any context. This is more about political ideology then about gender.

What was your opinion of Michelle Bachmann?
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Wed 19 Dec, 2018 08:53 pm
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:
What was your opinion of Michelle Bachmann?
I'm not sure who she is.

I think I've heard the name before though.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Dec, 2018 12:05 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn dAbuzz wrote:

Could you be more insipid?

My comment to you has no bearing whatsoever on your reply.




What are you whimpering about now??? You can't possibly expect me to understand how many insecurities you foster.
0 Replies
 
 

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