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Was a Texan the First Man to Fly?

 
 
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 07:20 am
A short article on Facebook prompted me to investigate. I think this article explains it very well.

https://drtlibrary.wordpress.com/2009/09/30/was-a-texan-the-first-man-to-fly-in-an-airplane/

The Facebook article:
Traces of Texas
17 mins ·
The Arcane Texas Fact of the Day:

Nearly 40 years before the Wright brothers flew their plane at Kittyhawk in 1903, a Texan flew a fixed-wing powered airplane near Fredericksburg in 1865. Newspaper articles reveal that Jacob Brodbeck successfully flew an airplane that he had built which was powered with coil springs. Some accounts say that the plane reached an altitude of 12 feet, others say that it reached "tree top" height. It crashed into a hen house, killing numerous chickens and scaring many children. Brodbeck, a teacher and inventor, came to Texas from Germany in 1846 and lived in Luckenbach.
 
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 07:49 am
@edgarblythe,
From the article you linked:
Quote:
This is primarily because documentary evidence is largely lacking, as Brodbeck’s drawings or blueprints for his airplane have not survived and descriptions from eyewitnesses (e.g. letters, journal entries, or newspaper reports) have never been found.

No drawings, documentation or eye witnesses, kind of hard to give him credit.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 08:24 am
@engineer,
The photograph could possibly be real.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 09:05 am
I understand we can't base our science and history texts without substantial proof, but I refuse to dismiss it a hundred percent.
engineer
 
  4  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 09:29 am
@edgarblythe,
Isn't that the basis for every conspiracy theory ever? If someone makes an extraordinary claim, they need to provide the extraordinary proof. Saying "hey, it might possibly maybe be true" isn't enough.

There are others who claim the "first to take a powered flight" mantle, but the thing about the Wright brothers was their meticulous documentation and research. They essentially founded the field of aeronautics and their findings are still used today. Not only did they fly and document their flight, but they were able to repeat it and tell you exactly why their flyer worked. That's a real claim.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 10:25 am
I'm not looking to convince anyone, just digging into the story.

Here is a colorful link, which also explains why there is no surviving paperwork. The description of his engines is worth the read. They were similar to a clock. As one wound down, the other engaged and was designed to simultaneously rewind the first. It explains why this did not work, but it was clever.
http://sweetheartsofthewest.blogspot.com/2013/01/who-was-first-man-to-fly.html
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 10:44 am
Eilmer of Malmesbury beats that by a few hundred years.

Quote:
William records that, in Eilmer's youth, he had read and believed the Greek fable of Daedalus. Thus, Eilmer fixed wings to his hands and feet and launched himself from the top of a tower at Malmesbury Abbey:


He was a man learned for those times, of ripe old age, and in his early youth had hazarded a deed of remarkable boldness. He had by some means, I scarcely know what, fastened wings to his hands and feet so that, mistaking fable for truth, he might fly like Daedalus, and, collecting the breeze upon the summit of a tower, flew for more than a furlong [201 metres]. But agitated by the violence of the wind and the swirling of air, as well as by the awareness of his rash attempt, he fell, broke both his legs and was lame ever after. He used to relate as the cause of his failure, his forgetting to provide himself a tail.

Given the geography of the abbey, his landing site, and the account of his flight, to travel for "more than a furlong" (220 yards, 201 metres) he would have had to have been airborne for about 15 seconds. His exact flightpath is not known, nor how long he was in the air, because today’s abbey is not the abbey of the 11th century, when it was probably smaller, although the tower was probably close to the present height. "Olivers Lane", off the present-day High Street and about 200 metres (660 ft) from the abbey, is reputed locally to be the site where Eilmer landed. That would have taken him over many buildings. Maxwell Woosnam's study concluded that he is more likely to have descended the steep hill off to the southwest of the abbey, rather than the town centre to the south.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eilmer_of_Malmesbury
roger
 
  2  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 11:12 am
@engineer,
You might oughta stay out of Texas for awhile.
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  2  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 11:38 am
Edgar: It's an interesting story, and might well have actually happened. However, the crash landing still gives the crown to the Wright Brothers. To have powered flight, you have to take off, fly for a bit, and land where you want to, not land in the trees or bushes or some other obstacle.

There was a fellow down in New Zealand a couple of years before the Wright Bros who almost got it, but when he landed he ended up in the bushes. That's why the Wright Bros are famous and this fellow is known as some guy in New Zealand.
Blickers
 
  2  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 11:47 am
@izzythepush,
Quote izzy:
Quote:
William records that, in Eilmer's youth, he had read and believed the Greek fable of Daedalus.
Again, crash landings eliminate you from contention. The title is for First in Flight, not First Up In The Air And God Help You After That.

There was an Englishman in 1867, forget his name but I remember the year, who came awfully close with a powered vehicle. I think he needed guidance from wires for some small part of the flight, but he very nearly had it. I remember the date because I was astonished how close he came just about the time the Civil War was being fought over here. You don't think of powered vehicles even on the ground in the Civil War period. Yet this guy almost pulled it off.

izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 12:06 pm
@Blickers,
Who sets the bloody titles? The fact is he survived what would have been a fatal fall by gliding a certain distance. And he did it in the 11th century, that's got to bloody count for something.

The thread title says first man to fly, not first powered flight or first take off, and it doesn't say anything about landing either.
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 12:08 pm
@Blickers,
I was with you at 1867, but when you said Civil war I shot back a few centuries. I found it hard to get back to 1867.
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 12:11 pm
@izzythepush,
If you want gliders, Wikipedia lists some early ones.

Quote:
In the year 559, several prisoners of Emperor Wenxuan of Northern Qi, including Yuan Huangtou of Ye, were forced to launch themselves from a tower attached to a kite, as an experiment. Yuan Huangtou was the sole survivor, successfully gliding over the city walls. He was later executed.[1]
Abbas Ibn Firnas (810–887), a Muslim Andalusian polymath, is rumored to have made a successful attempt at flying, according to the account of the historian Ahmed Mohammed al-Maqqari seven centuries later. He built his own glider, and launched himself from a mountain.[2]
In the early 11th century (possibly first decade), Eilmer of Malmesbury, an English Benedictine monk, attempted a gliding flight using wings. According to the Gesta Regum Anglorum, Eilmer travelled over a furlong (660 feet, 201 metres) through the air before falling and breaking both his legs, rendering him lame for the rest of his life.[3]
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 12:24 pm
@engineer,
Fair enough, that puts Eilmer at no 3.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 01:29 pm
@Blickers,
I don't want to take anything from the Wright Brothers. I was interested in this story on its own merit.
0 Replies
 
laughoutlood
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2018 05:09 pm
Powered flight, gliding but no mention of ascension?
roger
 
  2  
Reply Sat 13 Oct, 2018 01:43 am
@laughoutlood,
This is not about religion.
laughoutlood
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Oct, 2018 01:51 am
@roger,
Shaman me forgetting, hiya & higher



0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Oct, 2018 08:56 pm
@edgarblythe,
Was it in the spring?
0 Replies
 
laughoutlood
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Oct, 2018 09:16 pm
Quote:
First Man


Typical chauvinism.

The first woman to fly was Jezebel (2 Kings 9:33 )

0 Replies
 
 

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