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Is there a term describing the admission of family dependants of refugees in a safe country?

 
 
Reply Tue 13 Feb, 2018 12:37 pm
Hello,

I'm looking for such a word and it looks like it doesn't exist.
Family reunification and family reunion relates to reunite the family and not getting family members to a safer country, where a relative lives.
In German, there are the words "Familienzusammenführung" (same as family reunification) and "Familiennachzug"(coming after of family)

Thanks
 
seac
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Feb, 2018 01:38 pm
@CrazyMausi2000,
Sponsoring.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Feb, 2018 01:45 pm
@CrazyMausi2000,
I would say "family reunification". That is a fairly common term in English.

What is wrong with that term?
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Feb, 2018 01:55 pm
@CrazyMausi2000,
Not reunification, that describes countries, not people. Reuniting families is the phrase people use.
CrazyMausi2000
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Feb, 2018 03:55 am
@izzythepush,
Thnx but reuniting families kinda refers to, like it says, reunion of the family. And that does not just mean the admission of family dependants. An example: Both parents seeked refuge in Spain and the child accidentally got to e.g. Germany. It would be kind of family reuniting too, to get them together, right? And I'm looking for a term only describing the coming after of the family to a safer country, from e.g. Somalia etc
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Feb, 2018 04:54 am
@CrazyMausi2000,
I don't think they could be counted as reunited if they're in different countries. If we're talking about going somewhere safer, you could say they've found sanctuary somewhere else, but I can't think of a single word or phrase that encompasses both sanctuary and reunion.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Feb, 2018 06:06 am
The term "chain migration" has been around for a long time but has recently been in the news, having been picked up by Trump:
Quote:
As the White House and Congress grapple over immigration legislation, the term "chain migration" has quickly become part of the D.C. lexicon.

President Trump has blasted the practice as a massive immigration loophole that terrorists and "truly evil" people can exploit to infiltrate the U.S. Democrats have defended it as a cornerstone of America's immigration history.

So what exactly is it?

Put simply, "chain migration" is a derogatory term used to describe the ability of U.S. citizens and green card holders to bring their extended family into the country.

A majority of the roughly one million foreigners who are allowed to enter the U.S. to become permanent residents each year are approved because they're related to Americans.

USAToday

I want to emphasize that the term has only recently acquired this particular negative connotation.

Quote:
Chain migration is a term used by demographers since the 1960s to refer to the social process by which migrants from a particular town follow others from that town to a particular destination city or neighborhood. The destination may be in another country or in a new, usually urban, location within the same country.

Chain migration can be defined as a “movement in which prospective migrants learn of opportunities, are provided with transportation, and have initial accommodation and employment arranged by means of primary social relationships with previous migrants.” Or, more simply put: "The dynamic underlying 'chain migration' is so simple that it sounds like common sense: People are more likely to move to where people they know live, and each new immigrant makes people they know more likely to move there in turn."

Wiki
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Feb, 2018 06:18 am
@hightor,
Quote:
The term "chain migration" has been around for a long time


The 1960s is not a "long time" when it comes to word histories.

The term "chain migration" is used by people who feel that word "family" make immigrants seem too much like human beings. It doesn't even make sense. In truth, most of us are here because some great-grandparent came here from Europe.

Other than Native Americans, what does it mean to not be here because of chain migration?

Family Reunification is the proper term. And it can be used to describe why letting in the parents of a Syrian refugee escaping war is a good idea.
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Wed 14 Feb, 2018 06:30 am
@maxdancona,
Quote:
The 1960s is not a "long time" when it comes to word histories.

How long has demography been a field of study?
Quote:
The term "chain migration" is used by people who feel that word "family" make immigrants seem too much like human beings.

Sure. But the term is being used (misused?) currently to describe the phenomenon of family reunification, so it's worth drawing attention to.
Quote:
In truth, most of us are here because some great-grandparent came here from Europe.

That's not the same thing. People born here, descendants of someone who immigrated several generations ago, are not considered to be immigrants themselves.
maxdancona
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 14 Feb, 2018 06:37 am
@hightor,
Quote:
That's not the same thing. People born here, descendants of someone who immigrated several generations ago, are not considered to be immigrants themselves.


This is the exact definition of chain migration.

Please explain what you mean by this.
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Wed 14 Feb, 2018 07:29 am
@maxdancona,
Chain migration (as it's currently being used) means bringing extended family members into the country. It doesn't mean that every subsequent descendant is also an immigrant.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Feb, 2018 08:44 am
@hightor,
That was not my understanding. There are right wing posts about 1 immigrant leading to "thousands" of dark-skinned people who can't assimilate. The immigration you are describing is certainly not exponential.

If you take away the descendants of immigrants... the process isn't that scary to someone who wants to protect White cultural heritage.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Feb, 2018 09:21 am
@hightor,
I associate the term "chain migration" with people who want White Christian culture to remain as the dominant culture in the US. To me the term is politically controversial if not offensive.

Family reunification is the correct term. It explains the reason for this type of immigration; people like to have their families with them.

0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Wed 14 Feb, 2018 09:40 am
@hightor,
hightor wrote:

I want to emphasize that the term has only recently acquired this particular negative connotation.

Quote:
Chain migration is a term used by demographers since the 1960s to refer to the social process by which migrants from a particular town follow others from that town to a particular destination city or neighborhood. The destination may be in another country or in a new, usually urban, location within the same country.

Wiki


interesting to turn this into something related to family reunification

when I was growing up, the phenomenon was related specifically to people from the same village or town moving to the same place. It's how my parents got to my hometown. They followed people my dad knew who'd already made the voyage. One of them was his brother but he was also following the people from their home community. Similarly it's why my former next-door neighbours knew the shoemaker from my hometown - they'd come from the same village in Sicily. About half the village left in the mid-1950's. One batch went to Argentina, the other landed along Hwy 2 in Ontario. They were friends and neighbours in Sicily - then friends and neighbours in Ontario. They weren't usually families - at one point in the 1960's, my neighbours had 5 unrelated men from their home village living with them.

Family reunification is different from chain migration as it was defined (and still is - outside of the US).
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Feb, 2018 09:50 am
@ehBeth,
Quote:
About half the village left in the mid-1950's.

That's really interesting, ehBeth. I assume that no one subsequently had any difficulty "assimilating"? My wife's great-great-grandfather showed up with six brothers but they all settled in different places, breaking any potential 'chain'.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Feb, 2018 10:08 am
@hightor,
Some of them went home again. Not too many.

My father sent my mother (and me) back to Europe when I was about three so she could decide if she wanted to stay in Canada. We were back in Canada a few months later (once he could save up the money for the return trip).
0 Replies
 
 

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