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Michael Moore: Dems Are 'Wimps and Losers'

 
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Jan, 2005 05:27 am
Heh. Thats the first time Finn ever made me grin, I think ...

Lash's answer, on the other hand, was just silly of course. Moore is no more representative of the Democratic Party than Lieberman is. People like Salazar, Warner and Bredesen are contenders in the party; Moore is just an agitator.
0 Replies
 
Dookiestix
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Jan, 2005 12:56 pm
"When trumpets were mellow
And every gal only had one fellow
No need to remember when
'Cause every thing old is new again

(Dancin' at) Your Long Island Jazz Age parties
Waiter, bring us more Bacardis
We'll order now what they ordered then
'Cause every thing old is new again"

Now, now, finn. I don't make assinine comments regarding your monicker. And besides, it would seem as though blind patriotism and fascism are coming back in style these days, brought to you by those who are too old to perhaps remember the core beliefs of a traditional conservative. Therefore, they are now referred to as "neo" conservatives. They may be new, but they certainly aren't any better.

It's also pretty hysterical listening to neoconservatives talk as though they are experts on what the Democratic Party needs to win. But Michael Moore is right regarding BOTH the Democratic Party and the Republican Party.

Why do you think the "people" chose an agitator's film as the most popular movie of last year?
0 Replies
 
Dookiestix
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Jan, 2005 12:58 pm
"And don't throw the past away
You might need it some rainy day
Dreams can come true again
When every thing old is new again"

Just ask the African American men and women who were harrassed at the polls in Ohio.

Ah, yes. every thing old IS new again.
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Jan, 2005 01:05 pm
Dookiestix wrote:


Just ask the African American men and women who were harrassed at the polls in Ohio.



I didn't see any African/American men and women being harassed at the polls in Ohio.

What are their names?
0 Replies
 
Dookiestix
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Jan, 2005 01:13 pm
0 Replies
 
revel
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Jan, 2005 01:47 pm
I think that there are more early twenty years old that are conservatives than there used to be. At least it seems so where I live. Maybe these things go in generations. I turn 40 in April and I think on average those in my age bracket are more liberal minded than the younger adults.

However I just kind of found some of the replies to be the kind of way of talking that my daughter's talk (even though they are not conservatives, I think some things transcend politics) and that is why I thought they might be young.
0 Replies
 
Baldimo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Jan, 2005 02:56 pm
Dookiestix wrote:
"When trumpets were mellow
And every gal only had one fellow
No need to remember when
'Cause every thing old is new again

(Dancin' at) Your Long Island Jazz Age parties
Waiter, bring us more Bacardis
We'll order now what they ordered then
'Cause every thing old is new again"

Now, now, finn. I don't make assinine comments regarding your monicker. And besides, it would seem as though blind patriotism and fascism are coming back in style these days, brought to you by those who are too old to perhaps remember the core beliefs of a traditional conservative. Therefore, they are now referred to as "neo" conservatives. They may be new, but they certainly aren't any better.

It's also pretty hysterical listening to neoconservatives talk as though they are experts on what the Democratic Party needs to win. But Michael Moore is right regarding BOTH the Democratic Party and the Republican Party.

Why do you think the "people" chose an agitator's film as the most popular movie of last year?


I notice that you try and throw the term "neoconservative" around like liberal is thrown around. The problem is, it doesn't have the same effect. Could you please explain what a "neoconservative" is to you and what you think the major draw back is to being one?
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Jan, 2005 03:20 pm
Dookiestix wrote:


...pushy republican challenger intimidates blacks on black turf....

....



One thing you have to keep in mind when you read the occasional story of a republican challenger being "pushy", is that the guy is basically on alien turf. I mean, it's not like he's standing there in upper manhatten and the guys from the bronx are coming to HIM...

Moreover the kinds of areas which democrats mainly control are basically the kinds of areas in which vote fraud is more feasible, i.e. your large inner city areas. In other words, it's kind of hard to manufacture 30,000 votes in Appomattox county or Baylor county, the kinds of places republicans dominate. In practical terms, this means that virtually all of the elections which have been stolen in recent decades have been stolen by democrats, and the stories have a sickening monotony to them, an extra 15,000 votes turning up in Baltimore or Miami at the last minute to put somebody like Paris Glendenning over the top when it was obvious he'd lost.

In my estimation in fact the 2000 election was close only by dint of massive fraud on the part of the dems, with another such last minute find pulling Algor from 60K votes down to dead even in the last 25 minutes and somebody merely missing their tally by a couple of thousand.

More often than not, the thing which has enabled democrats to get by with this kind of crap is the fact that republicans have not had the cajones to go into these areas and check up on them.

Thankfully, that no longer seems to be the case. The republicans appear to have found a set of cajones at this point, and the kinds of fraud dems have gotten by with in the past are not going to go on any longer and, if the process produces one or two republican poll watchers who are a bit "pushy", all I can say is welcome to the first election of the rest of American history. The good old days ain't coming back.
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Jan, 2005 03:37 pm
Dookiestix wrote:
"When trumpets were mellow
And every gal only had one fellow
No need to remember when
'Cause every thing old is new again

(Dancin' at) Your Long Island Jazz Age parties
Waiter, bring us more Bacardis
We'll order now what they ordered then
'Cause every thing old is new again"

Now, now, finn. I don't make assinine comments regarding your monicker. And besides, it would seem as though blind patriotism and fascism are coming back in style these days, brought to you by those who are too old to perhaps remember the core beliefs of a traditional conservative.

Aside from being a non-sequitor, this is such a foolish statement in so many ways.

Therefore, they are now referred to as "neo" conservatives. They may be new, but they certainly aren't any better.

Whether or not "neo-conservatives" are "better" than any other variety of conservatives is in the eye of the beholder, but if you wish to intelligently discuss why neo-conservatisim may be noxious or just plain wrong, it would be helpful for you to understand the term and desist from using it as a synonym for "old bad people."

It's also pretty hysterical listening to neoconservatives talk as though they are experts on what the Democratic Party needs to win. But Michael Moore is right regarding BOTH the Democratic Party and the Republican Party.

Considering that Republicans in general, conservatives in particular, and specifically neo-conservatives have been politically more successful than all sorts of Democrats over the last four years, it's likely that they know more about what it takes to win than Democrats.

Why do you think the "people" chose an agitator's film as the most popular movie of last year?

It might be interesting to learn of how you came to the conclusion that Moore is so correct in regards to both parties. Surely the foundation of your conclusion is not the result of an award decided by a Gallup poll, but if it is, how do you explain the "Passion of Christ" also won a "People's Choice" award?

I hope the Democrats listen to Moore. I hope the Ted Kennedy wing of the party prevails and that the Democratic candidate in 2008 runs a leftwing course all the way. Not only will it assure a Republican victory, it may finally put a stake through the heart of the vampiric Left. But then, as long as their are people out there calling themselves Dookiestix, I'm sure there will be Liberals.
0 Replies
 
Dookiestix
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Jan, 2005 03:56 pm
Finn, you reinforce my point spendidly.

"Stake in the heart of the Vamperic left?" Nice.

"Demoralize the enemy from within by surprise, terror, sabotage, assassination. This is the war of the future."
- Adolf Hitler

Why should I explain Passion of the Christ winning a people's choice? That has nothing to do with Michael Moore. Besides, Mel likes Mike's movie. And you should have seen the Freepers running for the hills in their bloviating blogs on Freerepublic.com when he stated as such.

Traditional conservatives are for fiscal restraint, state's rights, lower taxes, and, at one point, conservation of the environment. It was Teddy Roosevelt's cornerstone policy. Where do you think conservative CAME from? Conservation!

Neoconservatives have been against everything but tax cuts to the filthy rich. They could care less about global warming, be it man-made or not. They could care less about voting rights. If Gunga insists that Democrats are the one's cheating, then why couldn't Republicans allow an investigation in Ohio? Afterall, wasn't it all Democrats intimidating the voters, as Gunga seems to suggest?

Amazing. Rolling Eyes
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Jan, 2005 04:21 pm
Quote:

I hope the Democrats listen to Moore. I hope the Ted Kennedy wing of the party prevails and that the Democratic candidate in 2008 runs a leftwing course all the way. Not only will it assure a Republican victory, it may finally put a stake through the heart of the vampiric Left.


I try to keep the democrat party and the concept of leftists separate. Basically, I can tolerate somebody being 20 degrees to the left of me politically; what I can't tolerate is the criminality and gangsterism which the dem party has come to represent. I want the stake to be driven through the heart of the dem party and the leftists to find some more rational and legitimate home for themselves.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Jan, 2005 04:25 pm
No, nimh. My answer isn't silly. It's one way of saying you don't know anything about American politics if you were serious with that guy from Tennesee.

Tennesee...a no-name...in the middle of the death rattle of the Democrat party? No way. No how. If they did throw up such a candidate--it would be the last nail in their coffin.
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Jan, 2005 06:52 pm
Dookiestix wrote:
Finn, you reinforce my point spendidly.

"Stake in the heart of the Vamperic left?" Nice.

"Demoralize the enemy from within by surprise, terror, sabotage, assassination. This is the war of the future."
- Adolf Hitler

Is that what I attempting to do with a metaphor that describes the Left's ability to seemingly live on through mortal blow after mortal blow? If only a posting on A2K could demoralize the enemy. Now I suppose you will claim that you are using Hitler's quote only in a metaphorical sense.

Why should I explain Passion of the Christ winning a people's choice? That has nothing to do with Michael Moore. Besides, Mel likes Mike's movie. And you should have seen the Freepers running for the hills in their bloviating blogs on Freerepublic.com when he stated as such.

Well since you seem to suggest that awarding Moore the People's Choice tells us something very significant about the American people, not to mention the accuracy of Moore's opinions, I would think that it must say the same about Mel Gibson. Perhaps Mel does like Moore and his movies, but that hardly explains the seeming paradox of their both winning the People's Choice award. Since the award is an important indicator to you, I should think you would at least be interested in attempting to explain the paradox. I guess not.

Traditional conservatives are for fiscal restraint, state's rights, lower taxes, and, at one point, conservation of the environment. It was Teddy Roosevelt's cornerstone policy. Where do you think conservative CAME from? Conservation!

And this little piece of political science is relevant because...?

Neoconservatives have been against everything but tax cuts to the filthy rich. They could care less about global warming, be it man-made or not. They could care less about voting rights. If Gunga insists that Democrats are the one's cheating, then why couldn't Republicans allow an investigation in Ohio? Afterall, wasn't it all Democrats intimidating the voters, as Gunga seems to suggest?

Another incoherent argument from friend Dookie predicated upon an childish insistence on using neo-conservative for boogeyman.

Not all that amazing, I'm afraid.

Amazing. Rolling Eyes
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2005 08:43 pm
Lash wrote:
No, nimh. My answer isn't silly. It's one way of saying you don't know anything about American politics if you were serious with that guy from Tennesee.

Saying Michael Moore stands for the Democratic Party is as silly as saying Rush Limbaugh stands for the Republican Party. They make a lot of noise, they're much more media-visible than any governor or senator, they keep the fire stoked and build some populist pressure from the Believers. They shape the rhetorics those Believers speak in. But they're outside the party, and in the end are no contenders compared to the actual party policymakers and eventual front men, some of whom we've probably hardly even heard of yet.

<shrugs>

Even Gunga knows to "keep the democrat party and the concept of leftists separate".
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2005 09:03 pm
Lash wrote:
Tennesee...a no-name...in the middle of the death rattle of the Democrat party? No way. No how. If they did throw up such a candidate--it would be the last nail in their coffin.

Who was Clinton in 1989 but a no-name from Arkansas, irrelavant to the post-Dukakis Democrat crisis?
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2005 10:34 pm
nimh wrote:
Lash wrote:
No, nimh. My answer isn't silly. It's one way of saying you don't know anything about American politics if you were serious with that guy from Tennesee.

Saying Michael Moore stands for the Democratic Party is as silly as saying Rush Limbaugh stands for the Republican Party. They make a lot of noise, they're much more media-visible than any governor or senator, they keep the fire stoked and build some populist pressure from the Believers. They shape the rhetorics those Believers speak in. But they're outside the party, and in the end are no contenders compared to the actual party policymakers and eventual front men, some of whom we've probably hardly even heard of yet.

<shrugs>

Even Gunga knows to "keep the democrat party and the concept of leftists separate".


Even Gunga? A bit haughty, don't you think.

(By the way, I frequently grin when reading what you write, or is it smirk?)

Who are the Moderates in the Dem Party?

Lieberman is reviled by the rank and file.

Evan Bayh staked his claim on the Left when he denounced and voted against Condy Rice.

The majority of Mods either retired or lost in 2004.

Kennedy and Kerry; Pelosi and Boxer; Lehey and Levin et al - Theses are the voices of the Democratic Party.

Do they sound a bit like Michael Moore?
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Feb, 2005 02:41 am
Finn d'Abuzz wrote:


Kennedy and Kerry; Pelosi and Boxer; Lehey and Levin et al - Theses are the voices of the Democratic Party.

Do they sound a bit like Michael Moore?


Tell you who Teddy Kennedy is starting to sound more and more like:

Foster Brooks.

http://www.comedystars.com/Bios/_pics/brooks_foster.jpg

http://www.comedystars.com/Bios/brooks_foster.shtml


Quote:

...Brooks was perhaps the only comic around who could make the twinkly-eyed, tippling Martin seem sober by comparison. For his variety show guest spots Brooks usually appeared as a monologist but sometimes came on as a bombed TV executive or tipsy husband in sketches. Questioned about being drunk, he might cock a bleary eye at his antagonist and announce, "I must say that I have a very good reason for bein' loaded." Then after an unsteady pause: "I been drinkin' all day!"
0 Replies
 
almach1
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Feb, 2005 02:03 pm
I only agree with moore on one thing, and that is that we need more passion from democrats. kerry had several opportunities take good shots at bush in the elections and debates, but he seemed to PC.Democrats need somebody with charisma and the balls to say it like it is. the problem is, I have no idea who that is.
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Feb, 2005 02:31 pm
gungasnake wrote:


Tell you who Teddy Kennedy is starting to sound more and more like:

Foster Brooks.

http://www.comedystars.com/Bios/_pics/brooks_foster.jpg


I always thought Foster Brooks did a mean Ted Kennedy impersonation.
0 Replies
 
almach1
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Feb, 2005 02:46 pm
Ticomaya wrote:
gungasnake wrote:


Tell you who Teddy Kennedy is starting to sound more and more like:

Foster Brooks.

http://www.comedystars.com/Bios/_pics/brooks_foster.jpg


I always thought Foster Brooks did a mean Ted Kennedy impersonation.
Mayer Quimby from the simpsons. (only cause how they talk)
0 Replies
 
 

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