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is decades in the making

 
 
Reply Fri 2 Feb, 2018 11:37 pm
Does " is decades in the making" mean "has been in the making for decades"?


Context:
Builder wrote:

It takes time, BillW. The case against George Pell is decades in the making. His main accuser recently died, so that put a spanner in the works, but more are coming out of the woodwork. Nasty bastards eventually meet their maker, even if gawd isn't it.

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Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 709 • Replies: 16
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View best answer, chosen by oristarA
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Sat 3 Feb, 2018 12:59 pm
@oristarA,
Ori. good q but I'd guess not. I get the impression it's just starting
0 Replies
 
centrox
  Selected Answer
 
  2  
Reply Sat 3 Feb, 2018 02:01 pm
Clumsy language. I suggest:

Was decades in the making: took decades to make; is now made.

Has been decades in the making: started decades ago; not yet made.

Will be decades in the making; has not started/has just started being made; will have been decades in the making by the time it is made.
PUNKEY
 
  0  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 07:54 am
In this sentence, the case has lasted decades, and is not over yet.
dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 11:30 am
@PUNKEY,
Nah Punk, it ain't that clear. see Cen's excellent resp, above
PUNKEY
 
  0  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 01:00 pm
@dalehileman,
Read the OP's paragraph, Dale.

This case has been going on for decades and is still "in the making". - i. E. Not completed or finished. The case "IS" not was.
dalehileman
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 02:40 pm
@PUNKEY,
Nah Punk sorry, ur wrong, Cen's right

No offense Key, just soertza kiddin' ya

o now--excuse me Cen, Punk, just checkin' to determine if Glitch # 55,674 is still in effect, the one that deltest the cap 's'

0 Replies
 
camlok
 
  0  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 03:26 pm
@centrox,
Quote:
Clumsy language. I suggest:

1. Was decades in the making: took decades to make; is now made.

2.Has been decades in the making: started decades ago; not yet made.


An even clumsier reply, Centrox.

1. Your result is not the only alternative.

The huge project was decades in the making but it was never completed.

You didn't even answer the original question. A clumsy attempt overall, Centrox.

2. As regards this one, the project could have been abandoned, and the speaker is using the PP of the HOT TOPIC/the PP of

Has been decades in the making: started decades ago; not yet made.

The now abandoned project has been decades in the making,

started decades ago, not yet made/completed and it is no longer being worked on.

dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 03:40 pm
@camlok,
Quote:
didn't even answer the original question
hoot Cam, I was sure he did. What's your reasoning in this resp

Oops, sorry, that's 'shoot' but with a cap that Glitch # 66,730,404 won't let my pc enter
camlok
 
  0  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 03:45 pm
@PUNKEY,
Punkey is right.
0 Replies
 
camlok
 
  0  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 03:56 pm
@oristarA,
If you use a member of A2K, Ori, for a question about English and their use of it, you really ought to inform them personally that you are doing so. I hope you did.

Who will know better their intended meaning that the speaker/writer.
0 Replies
 
camlok
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 04:17 pm
@dalehileman,
Centrox misled at least twice in his reply, Dale, and he totally failed to address Builder's use of the present simple tense 'is'. Jumping to the crazy notion that a native speaker, Builder, is using "clumsy language" is downright silly.

Centrox's very clumsy response illustrates that.

Dale is Dale [since he was born] = Dale has been Dale since he was born.

Dale is Dale now equals or intimates/suggests that Dale has been Dale since he was born.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Mon 5 Feb, 2018 01:05 pm
@camlok,
Thanks Cam for your attention to my remarks. ' good for the ego

Oops, forgot again that oftware Glitch 66,729 prevents cap 's', where 's been' means 'it's been'In some technical way, Cam, you might be right. However, disputation is quite a waste of time 'less you enjoy it. o I still maintain Cen has it on the nose. He's a very smart fella too
camlok
 
  0  
Reply Mon 5 Feb, 2018 02:00 pm
@dalehileman,
We use the present simple tense for things routine/always/habitual/... .

I live in Sapporo. I work at Mitsubishi. I always eat supper at 7PM.

My address is ... . My phone number is ... .

Builder used the present simple tense 'is' because he was describing an event that is ongoing, hence the 'is'. Punkey was dead on in her/his assessment.
dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 5 Feb, 2018 07:14 pm
@camlok,
orry Cam but don't folla ur reasoning
camlok
 
  0  
Reply Mon 5 Feb, 2018 09:21 pm
@dalehileman,
Think about when you tell people about your present life, Dale. Imagine that the answer to all these questions is an affirmative one.

Where do you live? What are your kids' names? Do you have a dog? What is its name?

Notice that these are all present tense verbs, used, and this is the important part, TO TALK ABOUT OUR LIVES, OUR ROUTINES, OUR HABITUAL ACTIONS, ONGOING EVENTS THAT WE EXPECT TO STAY THE SAME FOR THE FORESEEABLE FUTURE.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Tue 6 Feb, 2018 04:23 pm
@camlok,
Yea Czm, yes, thanks, and no, I know about them gram things. It's just that I can't find anythin' wrong wioth Cen's resp top Ori's OP
0 Replies
 
 

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