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Please help translate -English to Latin

 
 
Reply Sat 23 Dec, 2017 10:00 pm
Can someone please translate this statement appropriately from English to Latin:

"Kneel before the Truth"

Thanks in advance for your response.
 
simpson1
 
  0  
Reply Sun 24 Dec, 2017 09:18 pm
@jpperezchica,
my shot at "Kneel before the Truth"
is;
procumbo coram veritate. I kneel before truth
procumbas coram veritate. You kneel before truth,
etc.

but ask george before you get a tatoo.
jpperezchica
 
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Reply Mon 25 Dec, 2017 02:18 am
@simpson1,
Thank you, simpson. This actually isn't fore a tattoo, but it's more of a command (a motto I'm creating for a club), hence why I have it as "Kneel before the Truth". I was thinking of going with Coram Veritate, too, but that doesn't mean kneel exactly, which leaves me confused. It's definitely much better than what I had in mind before: "Genua Ante Veritas". But I know that that translation is very crude and doesn't really express the context that I want the phrase to have.

Thanks, simpson.
roger
 
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Reply Mon 25 Dec, 2017 02:58 am
@jpperezchica,
Didn't you ask this a couple of days ago?
jpperezchica
 
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Reply Mon 25 Dec, 2017 03:03 am
@jpperezchica,
I've been looking at google translate, and "coram" is suggested as the best translation for "before", because it means "in the presence of", where as "ante" means "before" in the context of time or position, which is a slightly different meaning.

"Genua" is suggested as the best translation of "Kneel", though other variants are also offered. I typed in "procumbo", but that means "lean forward" or "sink down" - a slightly different meaning than what I'm going for.

This gives me "Genua Coram . . . "

As for "the Truth", I'm stuck between three options, "Veritas", which I'm positive is grammatically wrong, "veritate", and "veritatem".

In other words, I'm still confused. Ugh!
0 Replies
 
jpperezchica
 
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Reply Mon 25 Dec, 2017 03:04 am
@roger,
I asked a couple days ago. Yeah.
0 Replies
 
George
 
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Reply Mon 25 Dec, 2017 03:41 pm
@jpperezchica,
I would say
Flectite genua coram Veritate if addressing more than one person
Flecte genua coram Veritate if addressing one person
simpson1
 
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Reply Tue 26 Dec, 2017 05:09 pm
@George,
George,
how did you get kneel?
i have genua is nom/acc plural for knee.
and the verb flecto, xi, xum = bend.
Am i correct that flectite/flecte are the imperative (plural/sing) of flecto?
then does flectite genua translate as 'bend to the knees!"? (where knees is in accusative, and 'to' is understood, i.e. no prep 'ad' needed?)
then, Flectite genua coram veritate would translate;
'bend to the knees! before truth'?
(or/ Flecte genua coram veritate- if addressing one person.)
thanks
George
 
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Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2017 10:16 am
@simpson1,
"Bend the knees" is the Latin idiom for "kneel". At least that's the one I recall
from my seminary days. We did a lot of it back then.

Flectite -> Bend (plural imperative)
genua -> knees (plural accusative, direct object)
coram -> before, in the presence of (preposition)
veritate -> truth (singular ablative, object of the preposition)
simpson1
 
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Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2017 01:29 pm
@George,
thanks george
I almost had it, but in flectite genua; knees is the direct object.

multas gratias
0 Replies
 
jpperezchica
 
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Reply Thu 4 Jan, 2018 03:42 am
@George,
Thank you, George. Your knowledge of latin has been very useful!
0 Replies
 
 

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