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2 English language questions

 
 
camlok
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 11:38 am
@centrox,
Quote:
It is in rude good health in British and Irish English, and in higher Au and NZ registers.


That is indicative of it being a more polite, formal structure. Such is the case also in AmE and CdE.
0 Replies
 
camlok
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 12:12 pm
@centrox,
Quote:
It is in rude good health in British and Irish English, and in higher Au and NZ registers.


The notion that there are people that speak in a formal manner for all their speech, all the time, is another old language canard.
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 12:57 pm
@camlok,
camlok wrote:
The notion that there are people that speak in a formal manner for all their speech, all the time, is another old language canard.

I have met people who do exactly that. I myself have been told that I speak in a 'bookish' way.
camlok
 
  2  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 01:04 pm
@centrox,
You and Dame Edna. There are lots of phonies around.
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 01:25 pm
camlok, why are so many of your posts stupid and offensive? Are you aged about 13? Have you got a personality disorder? Or are you just a "knob" as we say in England?



camlok
 
  0  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 01:34 pm
@centrox,
It's offensive to hold yourself up as a model of knowledge on language because you and others are snobs. Your high register crap is just that, crap.

There has been a long history of know nothings pretending that they know something about language because they pretend they speak like the Queen with a rod up her butt.

This is illustrated by your 180 degree turn away from the language issue.
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 01:59 pm
Registers do exist, and they have levels. Just because you don't like certain ones doesn't make them worthless or their users wicked or contemptible.

camlok
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 02:03 pm
@centrox,
Of course registers exist but only phonies would pretend that they are locked into a single register for all time, for all instances, a notion that is pure drivel.
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 02:07 pm
@camlok,
camlok wrote:

Of course registers exist but only phonies would pretend that they are locked into a single register for all time, for all instances, a notion that is pure drivel.

Well, I didn't "pretend" that. I said I have met people who spoke like that. I admitted that my speech, particularly when I was younger, tended toward the bookish. That wasn't pretending. It was the truth. Why would I pretend? I don't see why that caused such an outpouring of spiteful contempt.

izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 02:10 pm
@centrox,
centrox wrote:

Or are you just a "knob" as we say in England?



He is, he takes anti Americanism to a ridiculous extreme, including siding with North Korean dictators, and on threads like this he just likes to take a contrary position.

But if you want some real mad bollocks ask him about 9/11.
camlok
 
  0  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 02:35 pm
@izzythepush,
I wondered before opening your post, Izzy, what the hell could a complete language dolt like you have to offer on this issue.

Typical "great" Izzy stuff on the language issues.
0 Replies
 
camlok
 
  0  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 02:42 pm
@centrox,
Quote:
Well, I didn't "pretend" that. I said I have met people who spoke like that. I admitted that my speech, particularly when I was younger, tended toward the bookish. That wasn't pretending. It was the truth. Why would I pretend?


You "have met people who spoke like that" and you did a thorough study of their behavior to see that they followed thru in all their speech.

Kids never pretend, never try to put on airs, and you admit that your speech has changed but you wonder how anyone could ever think that you might tend towards pretense.
0 Replies
 
 

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