16
   

How many countries have you visited?

 
 
saab
 
  1  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 11:39 am
@ossobucotemp,
I think we have the same opinion - I don´t count airports or flying over some place as a visit.
When you sleep in the airplane or travel by sleeper is that then a
DREAM TRIP?
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 11:54 am
@saab,
In some circumstances, it could be a nightmare trip. I bet a lot of us have had a few of those.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 11:58 am
@saab,
When flying to Hawaii and you dream of South-East Asia, that really is a trip! LOL
I had to cut out South Korea from my list, so my list is now down to 81.
Anyone else here visit Esperanza Base in Antarctica? How about a flight over Mt Everest?
Was able to visit one of my heroes grave site, Ernest Shackleton in Grytviken, South Georgia.
Speaking of graves, I have also visited the graves of Tchaikovsky, George Patton, Shakespeare and all those at Westminster Abbey in London, Columbus in Spain (questionable), and Princess Di in Monaco.
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 12:13 pm
When I change train someplace - does that mean I have visited that city or dump just because I have seen the station? Or is it enough the train passes by or does it have to have had a stop at that station?
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 12:19 pm
@saab,
I think the rule is you must walk around in the city to make it count. Staying in the airport or train station doesn't count.
I flew over Mt Everest, and even took a picture. I wonder if that counts as visiting Mt Everest?
saab
 
  1  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 12:25 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Quote:
If you flew over the alps, it counts. I flew over Mt Everest, and I count that. Also, according to the century club, if you were in an airport in any country, that counts as a "visit."

This is what you first said.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 12:27 pm
@saab,
It's a confusing issue; some say contradictory things about what constitutes a visit.

Quote:
Some people have minimums such as “three meals, eight people” before they claim they’ve been somewhere. Others need to spend a certain amount of time in a place—at least 24 hours, at least a weekend. Some require travel to more than one city within the same country.

Everyone has different ways of counting. Touching down is good enough for some; the same with briefly driving or passing through. Getting through customs is another common marker. And while it’s certainly more official, it seems like just a start.


ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 12:32 pm
@cicerone imposter,
I say, who cares? I am guessing maybe travel club people care. I've never been a group travel type person*, quite the opposite (I'm my own tour guide), but people enjoy different modes. Each to his or her own.



*well, maybe back in my twenties
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 12:38 pm
@ossobucotemp,
I found that group travel has many upsides. a) Meet other travelers (have met many and kept in touch with some), b) tour guide that points out the important sites with narrative, and c) cut down time and cost of transportation. I have traveled to England often, but especially London, and know the city well by visiting on my own. Have visited most of the museums and art galleries.
Even had a a2k meet at Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese (Charles Dickens hangout) on Fleet Street many years ago.
izzythepush
 
  0  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 12:43 pm
What constitutes a country? I always take the Pointless definition.

0 Replies
 
saab
 
  2  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 01:34 pm
@cicerone imposter,
How superficial
three meals and eight people. That means about 24 hours and probably not one
snigle serious discussion or information about the country. Who are those eight people? Three waiters, a cabdriver, a person working in the hotel, a busdriver and a couple of people you ask for the way to.... Depending on where you are, out of those eight half might be non natives.
A week end or 24 hours - it is a visit but you do not get to know the country.
I agree that group travel can be good, but you as a rule only meet people from
your own contry. It is not easy as a group to meet "natives"
With all this "all inclusive" dinners you do not even get to know the genuine food of the country.

tsarstepan
 
  1  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 01:51 pm
@cicerone imposter,
US
France
Saudi Arabia
Kuwait
Iraq
Germany
Switzerland (for a day)
England
izzythepush
 
  -1  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 01:53 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

England


England is not a country.



That would have got you a 100 on pointless and a big beep.

The UK is a country.
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 02:02 pm
@cicerone imposter,
I thought I wrote a response to this but I see it didn't.
Anyway, you and I would be impossible travel mates, between us producing a mix of metaphoric tourist train wrecks and my metaphoric suicidal jump from an ocean cruise...... but there's room in the world for both of us, and I'm glad to have known you this long anyway, as we are both getting up there.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 02:08 pm
@saab,
Not really. Insight Tours attracts people from English speaking countries, and I have met people from England, Canada, Singapore, Australia and the US.
As a matter of fact, I have since than visited Singapore twice, and shared meals with them on both visits. Once at their home, and the Second at a restaurant.
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 02:10 pm
@tsarstepan,
Tell more when/if you feel like it, I'm interested.
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  2  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 02:18 pm
@izzythepush,
I didn't know that, or given I did, I'd forgotten. I get most of the titular stuff, but I've still thought of England as a country that is part of a weave.
ossobucotemp
 
  2  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 02:46 pm
@saab,
I had a friend I hope is still alive, but may not be, whose husband was an aircraft engineer (don't trust me, something like that) and an artist, and she was a city librarian and cooking teacher. She's the friend I've mentioned who had the front door enter the kitchen, because of her sideline of cooking classes. He was well able in design and construction too. I have seven of her books, and still use them sometimes, especially my favorite chocolate cake recipe. I've talked about them before at a2k.

Besides giving her name if her books are available anywhere or not, I'll say I remember them finally going on a tour, which I remember taking as not usual, but I only knew her for a clump of years. Together they were very inventive about matters like hanging clothes and how to have a grape arbor.

Ah, there it is in the Venice book. Chocolate and Walnut Cake, aka Torta di Noci e Cioccolato.

I've some research to do.
Foofie
 
  -2  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 02:46 pm
This thread is giving me jet lag. Also culture shock.

Am I wrong, but many of those who travel to foreign destinations, tend not to tour the U.S.? Meaning, the cultural nuances; i.e. rodeos in the southwest; Graceland, in the South; Disneyworld in Florida, etc., etc.?

I suspect more Democrats do foreign travel, due to their "citizen of the world" orientation, while Republicans are content to tour the U.S.. Am I wrong?
McGentrix
 
  2  
Fri 3 Mar, 2017 02:53 pm
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:

Am I wrong?


yes.
0 Replies
 
 

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