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To Temperature Can You Soup Or Stock Go Down Before You Cannot Re-Use?

 
 
Reply Thu 12 Jan, 2017 05:43 pm
I was making chicken stock, (bone broth), in a crockpot overnight, (takes days). Somehow, I set the crock pot wrong and the broth, after being heated on HIGH, (192 def F), for several hours, was unheated a portion of the night. I checked the temperature of the broth in the morning-it had come down to about 128 deg F.

I reheated up to High, (about 192 deg F), for quite few hours. The next day the crock pot turned off again, the stock was down to about 120 deg F. I turned the crockpot back on and had it going on HIGH for several more hours.

Finally, I decided the bone broth was done, it was quite hot at 192 deg F and I quickly cooled it down to just warm by putting it in a 4 qt aluminum pot for half an hour on a marble countertop and then put the bone broth in the fridge last night.

My question is: Will those two multi-hour cooldowns where the broth went down to 128 degrees, got reheated and then a day later went down to 120 degrees before being reheated again make the broth now unsafe to consume?

Seems to me the broth would have to get cooler than 120 deg F if you even wanted to consume it in the first place, but I don't know the health guidelines, and I usually like to go by them.
 
farmerman
 
  4  
Reply Thu 12 Jan, 2017 10:44 pm
@Blickers,
Since you reheated it after such a brief time, I wouldnt worry about the anaerobes . Aerobics can cause some things like shigella but I think you whackd em when you brought it bk up to temp. I dont think that aerobic critters will form spores . Osso is our bacteriologit.
Ive heated and reheated chicken bone broth many times (hell, id let the bakked bones sit out foro coolinh, and Id keep the brew cooling until a "schmaltz layer" formed to which I would remove and then reheat the thinner infused liquid with veggies to make a hearty soup
ossobucotemp
 
  2  
Reply Fri 13 Jan, 2017 06:41 pm
@farmerman,
I have a brisk bacteriology degree but I veered from that to immunology. I was usually mentioned, but only as subsidiary, in papers except for a few times with more attribution, that being reasonable.

But... much has changed since my day.

On how to boil, others know more..or less, re roasted bones.

0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Jan, 2017 06:49 pm
@farmerman,
Much thanks. I kind of figured it would be something like that, I guess what bothered me was that it would take at least a couple of hours to cool down to 120 degF, while a bowl of it would only take a few minutes. I calmed down though, thinking that people reheat soup after it had cooled down below 120 deg, so it was probably OK.

I talked to a cook who plans to go into cooking for the public, and the information she has read is that you're OK as long as you stay at 120 degF or above.

So I'll try this tomorrow.
farmerman
 
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Reply Fri 13 Jan, 2017 07:01 pm
@Blickers,
so wheres the soup now? in the frig? (I hope).

I lwqys llike to qdd a bit of vinegr or ascorbic acid to soups Im building. I can always dump the slightly sour tste with sugr or tomtoes (or cooked onions), But its a net trick to drop the pH q bit cause aerobic bacteria hate acids
ossobucotemp
 
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Reply Fri 13 Jan, 2017 07:21 pm
Cooking for the public, that matters, so I'll be quiet and listen.
I have made soups pretty much forever and not had gastric troubles from any lf them.

ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Jan, 2017 10:14 pm
@ossobucotemp,
That includes forgetting to put the soup pot away in the fridge.

I'm ignorant about all the bone soup routines, though I've long simmered roasted bones - just not like the present mode.
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Jan, 2017 10:34 pm
@farmerman,
Yep, soup stock or whatever is in the fridge. I have about 4 qts. Since this started off as a way to get gelatin without resorting to beef bones in this thread, (I used Knox for a few days and noticed the joints started feeling real good, not that most of them weren't in good shape already), I figured I'd try the bone broth. It contains collagen, which pretty much is gelatin.

The stock didn't gel, so I assume I have too much water in the mix. Guess I'll boil it down tomorrow while watching the playoffs-the kitchen's right next to the family room with the TV.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Jan, 2017 11:12 pm
Have you considered just buying some bone broth?

For all the time, gas or electric cost and fretting you've done you could have spent $4.99 and gotten a quart of it from Target.

http://target.scene7.com/is/image/Target/50691833?wid=450&hei=450&fmt=pjpeg
Blickers
 
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Reply Fri 13 Jan, 2017 11:43 pm
@chai2,
Considered it, and might well do just that yet. I checked the bone broth at the natural food store and it had some weird ingredients in it, like modified food starch, (which contains salt and I don't eat added salt). Frankly, I started this by tossing some chicken leg bones into a pressure cooker, and things have just taken on a life of their own.

I'd like to see a successful conclusion to this project, (and it has turned out to be a project), then I'll decide if I want to continue or just pick up the box of it at the store. I notice the brand you selected is Organic chicken broth with no added salt, that's even more interesting. Thanks for the help, that might just be what I end up doing.
0 Replies
 
 

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