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Confessions of a Cheese Rebel

 
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2016 04:09 am
At least you don't have this.

0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2016 08:14 am
@TomTomBinks,
TomTomBinks wrote:

Quote:
I recall as a kid my step father trying to force me to enjoy the stuff.

My wife has a lot of stories about being forced to eat various foods as a child. (Her family was very poor and couldn't afford to waste food). She now loathes some very common foods because of those experiences. Do you think that's why you don't care for cheese?

I didn't like cheese before he noticed. He was just a bully taking advantage of the situation.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2016 08:16 am
@edgarblythe,
On the other hand, our diet was severely limited most of the time. I am certain this had some to do with preferences as we grew older.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2016 10:21 am
@edgarblythe,
how about liver. My dad was raised on a farm as (almost ) a servant bcause he came from a family of 13 Russian immigrants (He was born in the US but , after about 3, he was shipped to a foster care facility that sent him to a farm family in Pa). HE was raised eating liver and loved it all his life. Liver and onions served up with sides of saurkraut and mashed potatoes.
He would go on about "properly cooking liver" > I would just gag.
To this day, I cqnt even look at beef or pork liver. Duck liver qnd chicken livers lightly cooked are great.
WHYZZAT?
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2016 10:24 am
@farmerman,
To me, chicken liver tastes worse than cow liver. But I have not been able to persuade myself to eat either one, despite the advice from a source I trust.
edit
I have never tried other kinds.
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2016 10:40 am
I've been lucky to once in a while find superb stores that carry fantastic cheeses, or even a shop that only sold cheese - well, mostly. There used to be one in Beverly Hills. I've never been wealthy so I rarely bought anything in B. Hills, but I worked there at a lab and would wander the shops at lunch time.

There are, or were since I haven't been there in a while, terrific stores with good cheeses in the Napa and Sonoma Valleys in California.

And then there's Parma, a favorite city of mine for a lot of reasons. Not only food, but especially the food, Aged Parmigiano just one of them. Don't get me started..
I also liked the architecture, and mainly went there to research/photo their main piazza. Let's say I recommend the place if you're in the area.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2016 11:15 am
@ossobucotemp,
P Reggino and Aged Asiago are my favs, add manchego and well aged (10 year) cheddar
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2016 12:33 pm
@farmerman,
Yuk, eating liver is the biological equivalent of eating an old oil filter.
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2016 12:51 pm
@farmerman,
Yes to all those. I'm busy trying to remember the name of a Sardinian sheep milk cheese that was wonderful. Another cheese I liked, relatively ordinary as such, but that I've not seen in the US, fresh Pecorino Romano.

Ah, the name of the sardinian one is shaping up... dolce Sardo:
http://www.lanostraisola.net/public/img_cat/dolcesardomezza.jpg
dolce = sweet, but I don't remember it as particularly sweet, probably just young.

I've had some robust gooey cheeses I liked, from a particular italian grocery in Culver City, alas now gone so I can't ask them.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2016 01:41 pm
Once I went to Houma, LA, with a brother in law, to work offshore. I ended up on the Blue Dolphin rig, 50 miles out there. When it was time to go home to Oklahoma, the brother in law had already left. I set out to hitch hike and my rides took me to Houston. I was arrested for getting too close to the freeway and spent three days on the pea farm. What has this to do with cheese, you ask? If you went out on work details they sent a cheese sandwich with you. Stay in the lockup and eat the slop on the tray. Even cheese was preferable to the slop, so I went out and spread gravel on fire department drives. It was a mild, almost tasteless cheese, sort of like a wax sandwich. The bread was good, anyway.
Builder
 
  2  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2016 02:34 pm
@edgarblythe,
Quote:
It was a mild, almost tasteless cheese, sort of like a wax sandwich.


And that is why I'm no fan of sliced cheese of any description. It gets a coating of fungicide or something like that, and a light waxing to stop it sticking to the plastic wrap.

My partner likes white cheese, which is soft and creamy like Brie, but less flavour. I'll have it on a water cracker with dill pickle on top, if my tasty cheddar isn't available.
0 Replies
 
Kolyo
 
  3  
Reply Sun 25 Dec, 2016 12:01 am
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

Now everybody will call me the "grouchy old cheese hating bastard." Folks will sneak up and place flaming bags of cheese on my porch, knock and run away.


There are two serious factions in the politics of cheese. One side swears by cow's milk and the other by goat's milk. The cow's milk faction is clearly the superior one and we need your vote. As far as I can see, you're a natural cow's milk supporter, so if you waste your vote on "no cheese at all", you may as well be voting for goat's milk.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Dec, 2016 12:06 am
@Kolyo,
Well, uh, I guess so.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Sun 25 Dec, 2016 12:16 am
@Kolyo,
I do not like it from a goat
I do not like it from a stoat
I would not want it from a moat
Or even steamboat
I will holler and call
I do not like cheese at all
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Dec, 2016 11:20 pm
“Poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.”
― G.K. Chesterton, Alarms and Discursions
“How can you govern a country which has 246 varieties of cheese?”
― Charles de Gaulle
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Dec, 2016 03:24 am
I know plenty of people who don't like any foods where the flavour is influenced by what I loosely call 'fermentation'. By this I mean where a raw food item is broken down or cured or transformed by microbes of some sort. (Is it umami I'm thinking of?) I know people who can't bear game or salami or some kinds of strong flavoured ham etc. They often don't like Spanish type table olives - these are fermented after picking.
Builder
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Dec, 2016 03:40 am
@contrex,
There's more than a little evidence pointing to fermented foods being one of the positive factors in longevity studies, though I wouldn't put cheeses in that category myself.

More like the yoghurts and Sauerkrauts and kombucha teas.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Dec, 2016 04:04 am
@Builder,
Builder wrote:
There's more than a little evidence pointing to fermented foods being one of the positive factors in longevity studies

I have recently read that cured meats can be carcinogenic, and also that processed meats are bad for asthma. This is a poser for me as I like those things and am mildly asthmatic, but hey! life makes us perform choices...
Builder
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Dec, 2016 04:07 am
@contrex,
There's a gulf of difference between fermented foods and cured meats.

I've done some donkey jerky in large quantities, which I believe isn't carcinogenic, but I've read those studies on the preservatives used in "cured" meats and salamis, and I do avoid them these days.
izzythepush
 
  4  
Reply Mon 26 Dec, 2016 04:28 am
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

“Poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.”
― G.K. Chesterton, Alarms and Discursions


https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/36/44/e8/3644e81d8bcc26327f9ec490eb784bc0.jpg
0 Replies
 
 

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