10
   

Nutrition Science is a Fraud

 
 
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 09:14 am
How the Sugar Industry Shifted Blame to Fat

Quote:
The sugar industry paid scientists in the 1960s to play down the link between sugar and heart disease and promote saturated fat as the culprit instead, newly released historical documents show.

The internal sugar industry documents, recently discovered by a researcher at the University of California, San Francisco, and published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, suggest that five decades of research into the role of nutrition and heart disease, including many of today’s dietary recommendations, may have been largely shaped by the sugar industry.


Harvard scientists published fraudulent research papers redacted by the sugar industry that minimised the health risks of sugar while demonizing those of saturated fat.

Quote:
The Harvard scientists and the sugar executives with whom they collaborated are no longer alive. One of the scientists who was paid by the sugar industry was D. Mark Hegsted, who went on to become the head of nutrition at the United States Department of Agriculture, where in 1977 he helped draft the forerunner to the federal government’s dietary guidelines. Another was Dr. Fredrick J. Stare, the chairman of Harvard’s nutrition department.


Evidence shows that the food industry continues to manipulate food science research and reporting.

Quote:
In June, The Associated Press reported that candy makers were funding studies that claimed that children who eat candy tend to weigh less than those who do not.


more...
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 10 • Views: 4,105 • Replies: 100

 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 09:42 am
@InfraBlue,
Great topic InfraBlue.

I'll be back with my soapbox later. Wink
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 10:00 am
I only paid casual attention to it, but everyone knew back then Dr.Frederick Stare was an automatic proponent of everything the food industry put out. It was that obvious and well known. The only question back then was if Dr. Stare was taking money on the side or just a deluded true believer.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 11:10 am
@InfraBlue,
There are enough real research about sugar and salt without relying on faux PhDs who get paid a few shekels to lie.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 12:34 pm
Big corporations will do what big corporations do: Anything to make a buck.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 01:05 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

There are enough real research about sugar and salt without relying on faux PhDs who get paid a few shekels to lie.


How do we distinguish the real research from the fraudulent when the food industry is enmeshed in the process?
Blickers
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 01:46 pm
@InfraBlue,
I imagine, check out the sponsor of the research. The pomegranate industry-actually a woman named Resnick who decided to create the pomegranate juice industry-sponsored research which showed that pomegranate juice was great for prostate cancer and a host of other things. The studies were sponsored by her or one of her organizations.

PS: Independent research has shown that pomegranate juice might still be better for various important anti-oxidents than other fruit juices, but the claims of the industry-sponsored research are suspect.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 02:29 pm
Nothing like a few sugary donuts after a nice helping of spare ribs. I always think of Woody Allen's "Sleeper," when waking up in the future he thought of all the foods we avoid now as opposite to what scientists supposedly learned was actually good for us.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 04:29 pm
@InfraBlue,
That's a decision everyone must make for themselves through common sense.

It's like politics and religion.
InfraBlue
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 04:35 pm
@cicerone imposter,
The deception is so prevalent that the nation's dietary guidelines are based on this fraudulent science. Common sense would dictate to do away with nutrition science all together.
ossobucotemp
 
  3  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 04:40 pm
@InfraBlue,
<listening>

I saw the article too. Important, for sure. I do think nutrition matters, but haven't trusted a lot of conclusions over some decades now.
roger
 
  4  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 04:45 pm
@ossobucotemp,
That sums it up for me. Let's not abandon nutritional science, but for gosh sake, inform us of any connection between 'researcher' and their industry connections.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 05:13 pm
@InfraBlue,
That's a depressing bit of news.
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 06:07 pm
I read an article in the Atlantic Monthly that was very convincing to me at the time.

http://www.unz.org/Pub/AtlanticMonthly-1989sep-00037

If I remember it was by a Harvard doc. Not too long after, he was debunked. And then at least somewhat undebunked. I haven't kept up....
There's a present bruhaha going on about statins (again, right now), even in the last few weeks.
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  2  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2016 08:13 am
@InfraBlue,
Quote Infrablue:
Quote:
The deception is so prevalent that the nation's dietary guidelines are based on this fraudulent science. Common sense would dictate to do away with nutrition science all together.

Don't throw the baby-and your life-out with the bathwater. Some years ago, when I was heavier than I am now, I was cutting down on salt when my sister visited for Christmas and cooked up all her special dishes. She knew I couldn't have much salt, so she bought all low salt ingredients, (as in the package said lower salt), and cooked for a week and a half. Despite keeping up with my Lasix, I felt puffier and puffier and seemed to gain weight. Then one night I noticed I couldn't quite breathe. The ambulance was called-congestive heart failure, something I had never had. I was in the hospital for a few days.

I told my sister that the package saying "low salt" was not enough, various companies and delis load up on the salt so that "low salt" is still too much salt. In the case of the food companies, research has shown that two identical dishes placed side by side, one with salt and one without, have consistently shown to rate the salted one as tasting better. Hence, all the salt in prepared and packaged foods. Apparently canning, even of such basic things as green beans, beets and garbanzo beans, are also high in salt, it goes with the canning process.

So I just overloaded on the salt so much inthose ten days-despite my sister trying to keep the salt intake "low" - the Lasix I was taking couldn't get it out, and bingo!-congestive heart failure.

Since then I just avoid salt completely. I still take Lasix, have cut down a little on the dose. I don't eat out much because of the salt, and salt substitute, (potassium chloride), works for me quite nicely to impart a little salty zing. My old high school and college chemistry days taught me that when sodium and potassium are substituted for each other in almost any compound, the result produces a very similar compound. Cardiovascular health is almost the only situation where substituting one, (potassium), for the other, (sodium), in a compound actually makes a big difference.

My congestive heart failure occurred six years ago, I kept away from the salt, and haven't had any problems along those lines since. The edema in my shins and ankles is way, way down, when it gets a little larger I increase the Lasix a few days, make sure I haven't been eating any salty foods, (breads and baked goods can have quite a lot of it), and I haven't been bothered since. I have a home blood pressure meter-the kind that automatically inflates-and about the only problem I have is that sometimes the blood pressure gets below 105 occasionally and I feel a little dizzy, so I cut down on the Lasix. Otherwise, the blood pressure / congestive heart situation is completely under control. All from severely limiting salt. So nutrition science still has much to give us.
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2016 12:07 pm
@Blickers,
Many Asian foods have MSG that I'm allergic to. When we go to any Asian market, I always look at the label before buying.
I love kimchi; some have MSG and some don't.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2016 02:05 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

Many Asian foods have MSG that I'm allergic to. When we go to any Asian market, I always look at the label before buying.
I love kimchi; some have MSG and some don't.


Do you believe that ginseng of any kind has benefits?
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2016 02:09 pm
@Foofie,
Yes, I believe ginseng does have many benefits, but we do not buy it. We try to eat a balanced diet that includes many fruits and veggies.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2016 02:24 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

Yes, I believe ginseng does have many benefits, but we do not buy it. We try to eat a balanced diet that includes many fruits and veggies.



I basically take Chinese Red Ginseng each day to prevent colds. Also American Ginseng seems to relax me. I read that in China, American Ginseng (specifically from Wisconsin) is taken as a tonic, since it is "cooler than Chinese Red Ginseng and Korean Panax Ginseng.

One time, by accident I took two different types of ginsengs in a short space of time. I started to perspire. I think that was proof ginseng is not a placebo?
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2016 02:28 pm
@Foofie,
First time to hear ginseng might be a placebo. With its historical use, I doubt very much that's even been considered. I do believe it's good for you.
 

Related Topics

Everything Eaten Yesterday - Discussion by Joe Nation
What's best Meat or fruit? - Question by JoeWillis
Food Deserts (one "s") - Discussion by sozobe
Mcdonalds Food? - Question by ButtermyToast1234
Losing weight without nutrition - Question by JamesRichard
Walnuts - Discussion by edgarblythe
Ezekiel Bread - Question by gollum
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Nutrition Science is a Fraud
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 04/24/2019 at 06:11:32