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What happened to the British language?

 
 
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2016 07:55 pm
I am talking specifically about the native language of Britain, before the English. For some reason it simply disappeared when the Anglo-Saxons arrived on the coast of the North Sea in the 5th century AD. The Welsh and Scottish tongue survived, but the main of Britain has passed into history with not even a trace. What is the reason for this mysterious vanishing?
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2016 10:54 pm
@Gordon410,
Gordon410 wrote:
I am talking specifically about the native language of Britain, before the English.
You mean pre-Celtic, ask about local kentum dialects?

Besides that, I doubt that those languages vanished mysteriously since the history of the British Isles and its inhabitants isn't really in the dark.
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  3  
Reply Thu 25 Aug, 2016 01:10 am
@Gordon410,
Language change tends to follow occupation by dominant (invading) culture since it is socially advantageous for natives to conform. In addition, the dominant culture often suppresses local language because they associate its use with rebellion.
Much of this, possibly regarding the specific language you mention, can be found in the very readable ' Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language' compiled by David Crystal.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Aug, 2016 01:38 am
@fresco,
fresco wrote:
Language change tends to follow occupation by dominant (invading) culture since it is socially advantageous for natives to conform. In addition, the dominant culture often suppresses local language because they associate its use with rebellion.
Where I live, the Bructeri were the local Germanic tribe. Then the Saxons came here, then the Franks ...
I don't know what dialect/language the Bructeri spoke or people living here before these arrived. But certainly every of those invaders changed the language.
But place names, for instances, didn't change a lot, not here nor on the British Isles, if they were in common use. Family names stayed as well (my family name is Old Saxon).
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Thu 25 Aug, 2016 08:48 am
@Gordon410,
Like latin - It became redundant.
0 Replies
 
 

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