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Meaning of "taking a woman off to the hay bales"

 
 
Dendi
 
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2016 05:02 am
What is the meaning of "taking a woman off to the hay bales"?

For example, a group of (non-close) friends is doing the famous Route 66 and, while crossing Arizona, at the end of the day one of the guys describes the day on Facebook:

"One flat tire in need of change. Ten diners we passed through. Zero hours of rest Adam had. Two cowboys seen taking Mary off to the hay bales. {...} Mary did get to go to the nearby town but she had to sweet talk 2 cowboys."
 
engineer
 
  4  
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2016 05:09 am
@Dendi,
Going off to have sex.
Dendi
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2016 10:55 am
@engineer,
Thanks for the answer.

I'm not a native English speaker (the guy who posted that is, though) but I kind of thought that the expression could possibly mean something along the lines "heading off to the sunset". Is it possible that is the meaning? Though to be honest, of all the people I've asked not a single person came up with such interpretation.

Failing that meaning, the only other meaning that appears believable (and in agreement to every single response I got from everyone I've asked) is "going to a secluded place to have sex with the 2 cowboys" either as a joke or with literal meaning.

Everything else in the post appears to be put in a slightly humoristic way but directly true. Ex, they did have a flat tire. They did pass through 10 diners. Etc. So one would expect that the line about Mary being taken to the hay bales to also be direct truth. Additionally, jeez, that's such a weird joke to say about a woman and post it in public on facebook...

On the other hand, that being literal... Jeez, heading off somewhere secluded to have sex with 2 unknown guys in an unknown place. And doing that in sight of the group of male/female friends!? She's a strong independent woman, they were having quite an adventure, tired, feeling adventurous, probably softened up by the heat, etc - but still, jeez... And, again, upon seeing that his friend (friend?) exposing that in a public post on facebook? Jeez...

---

It's pretty obvious "Mary" (not her real name, not the real post) is a woman I'm in love with. Not only am I not a native English speaker (and kind of thought that could mean "heading off to the sunset"), I can't even think straight about what it might mean.

Even though questioning the meaning of the expression stemmed from my insecurity, this is still a valid question about English expressions and interpretation of meaning - thanks for the answer.
engineer
 
  3  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2016 11:02 am
@Dendi,
Dendi wrote:

I kind of thought that the expression could possibly mean something along the lines "heading off to the sunset". Is it possible that is the meaning?

No. It is clearly meant as going off to have sex. Another similar expression is "a roll in the hay" which also means to have sex.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2016 03:16 pm
@Dendi,

Dendi wrote:

Thanks for the answer.

I'm not a native English speaker (the guy who posted that is, though. . . .)


I doubt very much that the guy who posted that is a native speaker.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2016 03:59 pm
@roger,
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2016 04:01 pm
@chai2,
I have to wonder about a country that uses hay bales when they could just as easily find a hay stack.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2016 04:11 pm
@roger,
I've seen many hay bales or whatever the called them in the fields in northwest california. Might have posted on that and a friend might have painted that, not sure. I probably didn't take a pic.

Hay stacks may be sane in some places.

I don't know - I don't remember haystacks around there.
0 Replies
 
Dendi
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2016 04:33 pm
@roger,
@roger
That "facebook post" was written by me trying to retain as best possible the meaning, context and intonation of the original real post while not entirely disclosing the real post/people. Ex: "Mary" is not her real name. Clearly my English is not so good. Sorry about that.

But I still feel that my version captures well the original post. The poster was writing about the day describing the abundance of things that had happened. I believe this is why his post was worded like that - focusing the number of each of the many things that happened on that fulfilling day, so every line started with a number which resulted in some strange wording at times (in both the original post and in my version too).

I do know for sure that the poster is a native English speaker.
0 Replies
 
 

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