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She will go out of the door.

 
 
Reply Wed 4 May, 2016 10:36 am
She will go out of the door.

Is of optional in British English? I think it is in American English.

Thanks.
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Type: Question • Score: 6 • Views: 1,415 • Replies: 9
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tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Wed 4 May, 2016 11:27 am
@tanguatlay,
I think in American English, the sentences would be
She will go out through the door.

and

She will go out the door.

"She will go out of the door" sounds awkward to my ears.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Wed 4 May, 2016 11:28 am
@tanguatlay,
Quote:
I think it is in American English
Don't know about the Brits, Tang, but here in the US we almost never use the of

...or through
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 May, 2016 11:32 am
@tsarstepan,
as much as that sentence can be made to sound good, this works


tsarstepan wrote:

I think in American English, the sentence would be
She will go out through the door.
0 Replies
 
Tes yeux noirs
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 May, 2016 11:40 am
In British English, "out of the door" is normal/standard, and "out the door" is informal and may be seen as an Americanism.


0 Replies
 
Cinderellie74
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 May, 2016 01:59 pm
Speaking as an American... She will go out the door. She went out the door. She will go through the door. She went through the door.
0 Replies
 
Tes yeux noirs
 
  0  
Reply Wed 4 May, 2016 03:05 pm
Arnold raced out of the door, and started...

In its time, it was once reported, this was one of the most often-read lines of fiction in the English language: it is the sentence fragment shown in a brief close-up shot of mystery novelist Jessica Fletcher's typewriter in the opening credits of the (US) TV show "Murder, She Wrote" from 1984 to 1991. I dare say Jessica Fletcher was a little old fashioned.

Historical studies have shown that around 1900, "out of" was the more common in US English, but by around 1940 the "of" was losing ground. This change has not really happened in British English.

A common British expression: "You can take the boy out of London, but you can't take London out of the boy". Substitute town/city/region of your choice.



0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 May, 2016 03:09 pm
Somehow, going out through the door sounds like something that might be done by Caspar the Friendly Ghost. Still, out through the doorway is a little cumbersome.
tanguatlay
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 May, 2016 08:58 pm
@roger,
Thanks to all of you.
0 Replies
 
selectmytutor
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 May, 2016 03:35 am
@tanguatlay,
"She will go out the door" seems correct than "She will go out of the door".
0 Replies
 
 

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