7
   

Is this sentence grammatically correct?

 
 
Sydney-Strock
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 07:10 pm
I would like the thank everyone who responded to my question. Smile

I am grateful for those who simply answered the question and for those who went the extra mile by showing me how to improve the sentence.

**Please, do not fight over the correct way to answer the question. This is a site for helping not arguing. :-)**

Glennn
 
  0  
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 07:13 pm
@Sydney-Strock,
Yes, I did read your response to Punkey. If you were aware of the awkwardness of the sentence, then you should be telling Setanta that it is awkward since he is the one who assured you that there is nothing awkward in the construction of the sentence.
Glennn
 
  0  
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 07:30 pm
@ehBeth,
Yes, I did read the OP. And the sentence was not grammatically correct. I don't believe there is a precedent for using the term "will benefit me with."

Perhaps "benefit me by giving me a head start," but not "benefit me with a head start."
Sydney-Strock
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 07:51 pm
@Glennn,
I did not ask if it was awkward. I simply asked if it was grammatically correct.

Thank you for your time.
Glennn
 
  0  
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 07:57 pm
@Sydney-Strock,
Quote:
I simply asked if it was grammatically correct.

I understand. See my last post.

The only reason awkwardness became the subject of debate is because one poster assured you that there was no awkwardness in the construction of the sentence.
oristarA
 
  -4  
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 08:54 pm
@Glennn,
Glennn wrote:

Quote:
I simply asked if it was grammatically correct.

I understand. See my last post.

The only reason awkwardness became the subject of debate is because one poster assured you that there was no awkwardness in the construction of the sentence.


Setanta's failure to recognize the awkwardness reveals the fact that his English skill is poor.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2016 07:21 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Your personal animosity is well known here.


That is a lie.
There is no anomosity towards you, Set.
You're goddamned bad-tempered, but by no means a bad guy.
Normal criticism against your inappropriate behavior will continue anyways.
0 Replies
 
Sydney-Strock
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2016 09:33 am
Oh sorry. I did not notice Setanta said that.

Thank you everyone.
I am sorry the discussion turned into an argument.
0 Replies
 
Sydney-Strock
 
  2  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2016 09:45 am
@Glennn,
I know that the phrases you stated are better. I never intended to use the word benefit. I was writing about benefits and I, without noticing, used the word benefit instead of provide.

I had to write four essays in one day. I tried my best to proofread, but unfortunately, I failed to recognize my mistake until after I turned it in.

Fortunately, that mistake was my only mistake. I am sure my teacher will understand.Smile

Thank you,
SGS
0 Replies
 
Below viewing threshold (view)
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Apr, 2016 05:33 am
GRAMATICALLY, it is correct. You have a subject/verb/direct object and adverbial prepositional phrase.

The question is: does it all make sense?

"My participation in this program will benefit me with a head start on my medical education."

participation / will benefit / me

HOW?

Does "with a head start on my medical education" answer that question?
Sydney-Strock
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Apr, 2016 05:46 am
@PUNKEY,
I know, Punkey. Did you see my previous response? I never intended to use the word benefit.
0 Replies
 
Sydney-Strock
 
  3  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 02:20 pm
I thought I should let everyone know that I was accepted into the college with the essay that included the "awkward" sentence. Either the reader didn't noticed or it wasn't that big of a mistake. :0)
0 Replies
 
camlok
 
  2  
Reply Sun 9 Apr, 2017 11:26 pm
@Setanta,
The sentence is satisfactory. It doesn't sound like SGS is an ESL/EFL, but regardless he/she asked for advice and Punkey gave that, good advice, which can be either taken or ignored.

Do you where the badge upon which is written, "Sheriff I decide the parameters"?
camlok
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Apr, 2017 10:03 am
@Sydney-Strock,
Quote:
This is a site for helping not arguing. :-)**


You are heading into university where it is hoped you will learn that arguing and debating is essential. And into Med school? I hope you won't sit silent while some elder physician puts some folks in the ground. Remember, doctors bury their mistakes.
0 Replies
 
fleapit
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Jul, 2017 05:36 am
Is this sentence correct?
fleapit
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Jul, 2017 05:37 am
@fleapit,
Is this a rhetorical question?
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Mon 10 Jul, 2017 05:41 am
@camlok,
camlok wrote:
Do you where the badge upon which is written, "Sheriff I decide the parameters"?


Anyone who doesn't know the difference between where and wear has no place advising anyone on the use of English.
centrox
 
  3  
Reply Mon 10 Jul, 2017 10:02 am
@camlok,
camlok wrote:
Do you where the badge upon which is written, "Sheriff I decide the parameters"?

Where does he where the badge? On his hat? On his shirt?
oristarA
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 10 Jul, 2017 10:22 am
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

camlok wrote:
Do you where the badge upon which is written, "Sheriff I decide the parameters"?


Anyone who doesn't know the difference between where and wear has no place advising anyone on the use of English.


Aha! That was simply a typo. I don't see that your English is better than Camlok's.
 

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