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Translation of "Permitto justus ad sum gestae"

 
 
NickTT
 
Reply Tue 16 Feb, 2016 01:28 pm
"Permitto justus ad sum gestae"

Can anyone translate into English, please? My basic latin just isn't up to the job! The phrase is from a plaque outside a door to my house. I don't know which previous owner it is associated with.

Thank you for your expertise.
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Feb, 2016 01:30 pm
@NickTT,
Here is the Google Link.

https://www.google.com/search?q=translate+Permitto+justus+ad+sum+gestae+to+english
NickTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Feb, 2016 01:34 pm
@engineer,
Thank you - I'm just not sure that's an accurate translation. Can you verify that it's right?
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Feb, 2016 01:42 pm
@NickTT,
No and Google Translate can be hit or miss, but at least it makes sense that it is on a door.
NickTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Feb, 2016 01:49 pm
@engineer,
That is very funny - I hadn't noticed or realised that!!
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Feb, 2016 01:55 pm
@NickTT,
George, our latin translator extraordinaire, will likely be along and help. He's way better than google translates, but isn't online here at all hours.

He has a caution statement that he is not a professional latin translator (having a job in another field), but he knows more latin than anyone else I know. I say this having taken four years of latin myself (never trust me on latin translation).
NickTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Feb, 2016 01:58 pm
@ossobuco,
Thank you - I really look forward to hearing from George. I learnt latin and my son is now learning latin so mine is recovering after years of neglect, but I can't make any sense of the phrase, or find it online (apart from the Google translate referenced above). I asked a friend who is a classical historian at Oxford University and he couldn't make any sense of it, despite a Classics degree. A mystery!
0 Replies
 
George
 
  3  
Reply Tue 16 Feb, 2016 02:47 pm
It doesn't really mean anything, but it may be a joke or just an odd response
from an automated translator.

Here are the meanings of the individual words:

permitto --> its primary meaning is "I let go through", but a secondary meanings is
"I give up or I leave"

justus --> means "just" in the sense of righteous

ad --> is the preposition "to" in the sense of direction towards

sum --> I am

gestae
--> can meaning "happened", especially as part of the legal term Res Gestae,
"the things that happened"

Put these all together and it's hard to make any sense of them. So how
did Google Translate get "I just happened to leave"?

Go back to that link and pass the cursor over each of the English
translated words. Google will high light the corresponding Latin word
that each English word is a translation of.

I --> sum
just --> justus
happened --> gestae
to --> ad
leave --> permitto


George
 
  3  
Reply Tue 16 Feb, 2016 03:03 pm
@George,
Note: At the link's destination, click on "Open in Google Translate" to see the
association of words.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Tue 16 Feb, 2016 03:18 pm
@George,
maybe the person who had the sign made up used google translate Cool
0 Replies
 
NickTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Feb, 2016 03:31 pm
@George,
Dear George - thank you very much for your help. The plaque that the inscription is on is at least a few decades old so it predates automated translators. I suppose it must be a joke and what a shame that the joke is "lost in translation". It remains a mystery!
0 Replies
 
 

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