6
   

Now there's a Hallmark moment for you.

 
 
SMickey
 
Reply Tue 19 Jan, 2016 07:03 pm
Happy New Year, everybody.
I hope I could be better at English than last year, haha.

I'm watching a movie, Family Man and I've this puzzling sentence.
I'm giving you the context.

Jack, the president of a giant company, is a workaholic
and all he cares about is closing the deal of the following day.
He still was being obsessed with the deal when his colleague walks into his office, saying
"8:35 on Christmas eve. Jack Campbell still at his desk. Now there's
a Hallmark moment for you."

And Jack replies,
"Peter, I don't see you rushing home to trim the tree."

I could notice these two workaholics were jokingly blaming each other for
sticking around the office on Christmas Eve, not spending time with family.

What I'd like to know more is the phrase 'Hallmark moment'.

I looked up the dictionary to find out the meaning of it :
A hallmark moment is when you have a moment that would be perfect on a card. It doesn't matter if its funny or not, it just has to be card material.

Well, it didn't help me a lot.

I guess what Peter intended was 'No wonder you're here. You know nothing but work.' by using the expression 'Hallmark moment', but I'm not sure.

Could you please help me figure that out?
Thank you.
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Type: Question • Score: 6 • Views: 1,195 • Replies: 13
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View best answer, chosen by SMickey
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jan, 2016 07:30 pm
@SMickey,
It means...sentimental...idylic... greeting-card kind of sentimentality. Hallmark is a very large greeting card company that always has corny sentimental words that are known to many citizens of North America.
SMickey
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jan, 2016 07:42 pm
@Ragman,
Is it like, 'The Hallmark company is gonna give you some gifts or something in reward for working hard,' if rephrased, jokingly?
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Tue 19 Jan, 2016 08:40 pm
@SMickey,
No, it's not that. Hallmark sells nostalgia and sweet sentiments. Even Hallmark used "a Hallmark moment" as an advertising line to convince people that if they bought a lovely Hallmark card "A Hallmark moment" would ensue as the happy recipient and card sender would read the sentiment and get a warm lovely feeling.

Hallmark Cards was overselling their significance in happy family card giving, but the selling phrase "a Hallmark moment" caught on especially if you were describing an idyllic moment. The example of a man working at 8:30 pm on Christmas Eve was a parody of a family man who would normally be home. It's supposed to be tongue in cheek.

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jan, 2016 09:22 pm
@glitterbag,
I'm a quite old a2k woman who was in commercial for them as a child.

As the woman I've become, I'm not a very saccharine person.
This is now 6o years from when I was in that commercial.
I take it as a mix of their understanding how some people felt back then and business.

I've no idea if they are still in business, or, if they are, who their audience is.
Well, I've an idea, but no data.

I do understand that people who want to wish a dear one well will buy one of their cards and that the receiver will like it.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jan, 2016 09:27 pm
@ossobuco,
We still have Hallmark card shops stuffed in shopping strip malls all over the place, They sell cards, gift bags, wrapping paper, all sorts of do-dads. But, I can't remember the last time I saw an ad campaign for Hallmark. But thats apropos of nada. I'm entering the vegetative years.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jan, 2016 10:19 pm
@glitterbag,
Well, we still know what you send "when you care enough to send the very best."
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jan, 2016 11:07 pm
@roger,
I know, it lives on in our our our .......sub-concious? Is that right?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Jan, 2016 01:02 am
meantime, I've got a **** follower. Mostly that's funny.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Wed 20 Jan, 2016 03:09 am
The term, which means maudlin and saccharine sentimentality, is being used sarcastically.

What surprises me most is that no one here has commented on just how bad the writing quoted is. That's rally crap writing.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
  Selected Answer
 
  2  
Reply Wed 20 Jan, 2016 04:24 am
@SMickey,
You are trying too hard, S. Mickey . . . this was grossly overwritten.

I hope I can be better at English than last year, haha.

(Could is the conditional, but there is no condition implicit in the sentence nor explicit in what you write. You could be better if . . . if what?)

I watched a movie, Family Man, and I heard a puzzling sentence.

(Throughout your opening post, you use progressive verb tenses--a form of "to be" with the present participle--such as i am watching a movie. You were watching the movie while you were posting here? I don't blame you too much for that, there are Americans who would say "I'm watching this movie, and . . ." But it is not acceptable formal English. I don't believe the British use such a locution, which is even more odd because you use "I've," which is very British, and not commonly used colloquially by American speakers of the language. Present progressive verb forms indicate a continuing action or condition. They also sometimes express the future, but only with adverbs of time: "We are leaving for Chicago in an hour." You beat the present progressive to death here.)

I'll give you the context.

(Stop using progressive verb forms, there are specific cases in which they are used, and you are overdoing it.)

Jack, the president of a giant company, is a workaholic and all he cares about is closing the deal on the following day. He was still obsessed with the deal when his colleague walks into his office, and said:

"8:35 on Christmas eve. Jack Campbell still at his desk. Now there's
a Hallmark moment for you."

And Jack replies,
"Peter, I don't see you rushing home to trim the tree."

I notice these two workaholics blamed each other for being in the office on Christmas Eve, not spending time with theirfamilies.

(STOP USING PROGRESSIVE VERB FORMS!

Study conditional verbs, you're getting that part wrong, too. You could notice? Under what circumstances could you notice that? You could notice that if . . . ?)

********************************************

Your English has improved since you've been posting here, but you have a long way to go--mostly because you are trying too hard. English is actually a simple language, especially in colloquial use. I think you might profit from making a special study of conditional verbs and present progressive verbs.
SMickey
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2016 01:54 am
@Setanta,
Thank you so much, Setanta.
This is exactly what I needed.
Now I can see that I've overused progressive verb forms and conditional verbs.
Just like you said, I need to make a special study of them right now.
I don't think I can thank you enough.
0 Replies
 
SMickey
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2016 07:33 am
@Setanta,
And about 'I watched a movie..'.

Well, actually I watched the movie, and watching it only once, I thought, wasn't, good enough, so I kept watching it over and over again, and still I watch it every day. That's why I said 'I am watching a movie.'
Does it still not make much sense though?
Or should I have said 'I've been watching a movie'?

I'd appreciate any comment from you, Setanta.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2016 07:47 am
@SMickey,
There is a problem in the use of the present participle (going, watching, laughing, mugging, etc.) which arises, i suspect, because of a sense of the present which is different in English than in many other languages. I have commonly encountered this with speakers of European languages, in which the use of the present participle is rather vague and broad, while in English it is very specifically used. If you were watching the movie while you were also typing your post to submit here, then watching the movie was appropriate. But if you had just finished watching the movie, and then began to write your post, watching the movie is an event in the past, so in English you would say you watched the movie. I am drinking a cup of coffee while i type this. Not literally, because i'm typing and stopping to drink some coffee. But there is still coffee in my cup, so drinking it is an ongoing event in the present. If i finish it before i submit this post, however, it becomes an event in the past, and i would say that i drank a cup of coffee while i was reading your post, then i typed this response. I hope that's clear. If not, let me know and i'll attempt to make it more comprehensible.

Most English speakers would only say "I've been watching a movie" it it were a very recent event--something they had done that same day. If they watched the movie in the morning, they might say that at lunch time, but by the afternoon, they'd say "I watched a movie." This is sort of arcane knowledge, something you learn by using the language, reading the language and speaking it with native speakers. I can't say that you switch from the present participle (watching} to the simple past (watched) after one hour, or 30 minutes. It varies according to the English speaker's sense of an event. If i've been digging in the garden today, that might cover the entire day from sunrise to sunset. I might not be digging in the garden every minute of the day, but it characterizes the activity. If you call me and ask what i'm doing, i might say i'm reading a book, even though i've stopped reading it to answer the phone. But if i say i'm watching a movie, then that means the movie is playing as i speak. If i turn off the television, then i'm no longer watching the movie, i've just watched the movie.

As always, English speakers retain the right to make obscure explanations and to pretend that they're simple, even if they're not. Wink
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