6
   

how do I get my sister to give up her pet rabbit for a better home?

 
 
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 01:10 am
a few years ago (about 5) we obtained a rabbit for my little sister. she had never had a rabbit before and I have volunteered at the animal shelter (specifically in the small animal department) so I figured it would be alright since I know what they need. the rabbit is fine, but my sister doesn't quite give him the attention he needs or feed him regularly which is a BIG deal.

I'm often doing all of the work. she just likes looking at him and petting him and that's about it. (And thats if she even acknowledges his existance.) its quite expensive to take care of a rabbit in my area since they aren't as common as cats and dogs. I've had to buy medicine/vitamins for him online twice, take him to the vet, and I try my best to make sure he has a green diet. its not impossible to care for him, its just that I'm putting time and money into a creature she doesn't even appreciate.

I feel like the rabbit would be better off with this woman I know who is looking for a companion for her own bunny.

we have a cat and cats are what our family is the most comfortable with. we've had many over the years. my cat Jamie gets along fine with the rabbit, but still. I think it would be in everyone's best interest if we give the rabbit to the woman who wants him. we know her well, and my mom likes the idea of having two cats again. However she doesn't want to have 3 pets. my sister hates the idea of letting him go. she won't even listen to me, because she's had him so long. She doesn't want to hear anything negative, about him. this isn't anything we plan to do soon, but its something that probably won't happen unless I get her to see reason. She's always irritated by me as it is because she's a whirlind of a teen girl. Also, I don't want her to think we are trying to boot out her rabbit so we can have another cat. How can I make her see that giving him another home is better for him? (she's 14 BTW and I'm 20)
 
jespah
 
  7  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 05:07 am
@frostfire,
This is really your mother's job, and not yours.

Either way, though, the thing to do is have your little sister care for the rabbit for a week. Any neglect costs her allowance money or time with her phone, whatever is appropriate (see why this is your mother's responsibility, and not yours?).

Your sister either shapes up or the bunny ships out.

Revisit every three months if the lesson hasn't taken.

And start having that kid pay for bunny chow or at least participate in care. This is not a stuffed toy. It's not just for petting and occasional admiration. It's for feeding, vet, and cleaning, too, like every other living creature.
Tes yeux noirs
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 05:17 am
14 is old enough to take responsibility.
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 06:28 am
@Tes yeux noirs,
leave recipes for rabbit laying around the house.
maxdancona
 
  3  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 08:04 am
@farmerman,
My sister called her rabbit "Snowflake", but the rest of us all called him "Stew".
0 Replies
 
frostfire
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 08:10 am
@jespah,
My mom is letting us sort it out for ourselves; it was my idea, my time/money, and its her rabbit. She just basically enforces what I say to my sister.

We never really got allowance, but phone time may work. (of course, I'd have to be the one monitoring her time, and I'd have to have my mom enforce it.)

As for cleaning and such, I already MAKE her do it if she hasn't, but very rarely does she follow through. Often I end up doing it for the rabbit's sake, or telling my mom (in which case, she's quick to start cleaning, but slow to finish the job.)

The phone thing might work, since that's all my sister does. But I'd have to watch her closely; she has a habit of getting old phones from friends every time we take her phone away. (She has 2 at the moment.)
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 08:15 am
@frostfire,
If it were me, I would write down a set of conditions and make it clear that if these conditions are not met, you will take the rabbit away. Give your sister a chance to respond (she may have something reasonable to negotiate), but basically the decision of what conditions you set are your decision.

It is important that these conditions are clear to your sister(so there is no question about whether they are met or not). It is important that there is a written date that you will decide (based on whether the conditions are met or not) if the rabbit stays or goes.

Then if the conditions aren't met, the rabbit goes. Since you have a written set of conditions, it will be clear that you are being fair.
jespah
 
  3  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 08:26 am
@frostfire,
Then get your mother to take the lead on this.

Seriously. This is Mom's work; it's not yours. You are being put in an untenable position, where you are the one doing the parenting but you have no real authority, so it backfires. I'm sorry you're in this position (and I'm even sorrier the bunny is), but the bottom line is, your mother is falling down on the job here.

The problem is that the consequences will mainly fall on the rabbit.

Explain. Again. Tell your mother this creature may die young under your sister's lack of care.

Is your father around, even if your folks are divorced or separated? Might be time to bring in bigger guns. If not your father, then your grandparents. It is not fair to you, at all, to have to be the parent in all of this.
frostfire
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 08:28 am
@maxdancona,
I actually like that idea. Smile what length of time would you consider? I was thinking 3 months...( more than enough time for her to develop a routine for caring for him)
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 08:39 am
@frostfire,
Frankly, at the most 30 days. This is an important step in learning about caring...not just about caring for a pet...but about forming good conscientious habits.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 08:39 am
@frostfire,
we raised champion angora rabbits for a while. They all ere in roomy cages and did not have the run of any buildings (We had a barn milk- house that we turned into a warren. )
Rabbits are touchy and will catch and cause diseases that can be transmitted to other pets or livestock (Thats why we got rid of them because of coccidia)
frostfire
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 08:39 am
@jespah,
Mmm, my parents are divorced, and on good terms, but my dad isn't very involved with us because of his location. As for the grandparents, all of the grandparents are dead as of now ^^; plus our family is kinda 'not my problem, deal with it yourself' and distant. (But that's a whole other thing I won't get into.)

My mom is not really concerned about it; she says she has better things to worry about, and if he dies, then my sister will just face the consequences. Rabbits are kind of disposable in her opinion. However its the RABBIT that will face the consequences more than anyone, as you said.

So this is really something I need to solve on my own since the rabbit's well-being seems to be on the bottom rung of the important affairs list. Plus I may not have my sister's respect, but I DO have the rabbit woman's phone number.

0 Replies
 
frostfire
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 08:42 am
@Ragman,
30 days, huh? That may be best (since I just thought about it, and in my sister's care he probably would be dead after the second month o.o)
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 08:45 am
@frostfire,
eggs-act-ly

Plus if the right habit is going to take hold, it'll do so in 30 days as likely as any time-frame. Telling her what is expected of her (and the ultimate consequences) will have to matter to her. Regardless, she has to understand someone has to look out for the rabbit. Her widdle feelings may have to be bruised a little about her lack of responsiveness and responsibility.

The 'kid gloves' need to be removed with regards to her lack of care...as she has gotten away with this for far too long.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 08:51 am
@farmerman,
so..then this could be said to be about 'warren peace'?
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  2  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2016 11:46 pm
@frostfire,
I just want to say thank you for caring about a little pet who needs help and care. You seem to be the type of person people can rely on to do the right thing, and that is a wonderful thing to be.
frostfire
 
  2  
Reply Sun 10 Jan, 2016 12:37 am
@Blickers,
Aw, thank you ^.^
0 Replies
 
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2016 12:03 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
leave recipes for rabbit laying around the house.
Rabbit is quite tasty. Similar to chicken, but all white meat. I used to raise 'em, but never could get used to the idea of lopping off their cute little heads.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2016 02:31 am
@neologist,
Mmmmm..... Lapin A La Cocotte.
0 Replies
 
Miss L Toad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2016 05:26 am
Quote:
how do I get my sister to give up her pet rabbit for a better home?


Try to make home more desirable than the rabbit hutch, eg :

1. Scatter carrots and cauliflower leaves in the kitchen.

2. Mention that there are no locks on her room any more.

3. Stress that jumping is optional not obligatory.

0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » how do I get my sister to give up her pet rabbit for a better home?
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 08/17/2019 at 04:30:42