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Lying about a dog being an emotional support dog

 
 
Linkat
 
Reply Thu 19 Nov, 2015 02:17 pm
What do you think about lying about a dog being an emotional support when it is not?

There are no requirements to meet to have your pet registered as an emotional support pet. There is a basic kit you can buy for about $60 that shows you how to go about doing this. That is it just $60 and then all you need to do is to say you have a service dog and you cannot be denied renting, entrance into restaurants, on a plane, etc. based upon that because it is considered discriminatory.

I was reading an online pet community at work about someone wanting to rent a place and they had a "dangerous" breed dog even though his particular dog was quite friendly and this was suggestion given.

Personally it irks me - because there are people who really need this and when you do not you diminish that person's needs as being trivial. Not to mention there could be a good reason someone does not want to rent to someone with a "dangerous" breed - often times their home insurance is higher and/or even the inability to get home insurance.
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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 1,230 • Replies: 12
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Tes yeux noirs
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Nov, 2015 02:50 pm
What country allows registration of "emotional support dogs"?
[Edit] Wikipedia to the rescue: it's the USA, and you have to have a verifiable condition, and you have to get a physician to prescribe the animal. Surely faking this would be illegal in some way?

neologist
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Nov, 2015 03:13 pm
@Tes yeux noirs,
Anyone can buy decals and clothing designating "service dog", even "service animal". Even without such designation, proprietors are not allowed to ask for proof. (So far as I understand)

So my service croc is ok, I guess.
Tes yeux noirs
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Nov, 2015 03:20 pm
@neologist,
The Fair Housing Act and the Air Carrier Access Act allow for modification of "no pets" policies on the condition that the correct documentation, including a letter from a mental health professional verifying that the ESA is prescribed, is provided.

And...

The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Federal Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988 require the landlord/property manager to make a reasonable accommodation to their policies and allow the tenant to have an emotional support animal. This includes species, breed, and weight policies.

These laws allow a property manager to accept a letter from the tenant's licensed mental health professional (LMHP) for an ESA, but they may also require a verification form to be completed by a physician or LMHP, confirming the tenant's physical/emotional/psychiatric disability.
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Nov, 2015 03:26 pm
@Tes yeux noirs,
There may be different standards of application between apartment renting and supermarket shopping.

I'll accept the word of those who know.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Nov, 2015 03:56 pm
@neologist,
Service croc? Is that the one that makes his face a platter?

Sorry, this is actually a serious subject.
I'm not sure what I think except that I agree with the ideas Tes yeux noirs said he/she read were rules here.

I'm a dog crazy person, love them dearly, and fully understand people emotionally iffy in the first place, which can be many of us, being stressed not being with them. On the other hand, my b.s. signal range is yipping re the amount of insistence. I've also tested 4+ allergic to dogs. 4+ to cats too, but I'm much more so to cats.

In real life, I've had a hard time with only one dog ever; ironically, since they are famously not so allergy causing, she was a poodle named Marvel. When we left that friend's house, I would be bordering on full on asthma. Yes, I had had a couple of years of allergy shots back then. Meh!

On the other hand, I've lived with and loved several dogs and even a few cats. Dogs in particular are, to me, very much steadiers, and I need to see them often, if only walking on down the street with their persons.

I was allergic to our cats but not enough to not be around them, and only mildly allergic to our irish setter. Very mildly allergic to Pacco the corgi (at bath time, similar to the setter) and not at all to Katy the beautiful shepherd.
I am happy to see cats in bookstores and dogs waltzing around a pet shop and don't have a reaction in that amount of time. But I bet some people could have trouble with that.. not sure.

Am interested in others' opinions.
Me, now I have a pet furry stuffed sea otter I found in a thrift shop. She sits near the window and can make me sense I'm at home if I wake up and look in that direction..




Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Nov, 2015 08:51 am
@Tes yeux noirs,
The thing is you would think - but it would be hard to catch as this is under the ADA law:

◾When it is not obvious what service an animal provides, only limited inquiries are allowed. Staff may ask two questions: (1) is the dog a service animal required because of a disability, and (2) what work or task has the dog been trained to perform. Staff cannot ask about the person’s disability, require medical documentation, require a special identification card or training documentation for the dog, or ask that the dog demonstrate its ability to perform the work or task.

So basically you cannot ask for proof so you are relying on the fact that someone is being honest about the service animal. The one thing though that is stated in the law:
◾A person with a disability cannot be asked to remove his service animal from the premises unless: (1) the dog is out of control and the handler does not take effective action to control it or (2) the dog is not housebroken. When there is a legitimate reason to ask that a service animal be removed, staff must offer the person with the disability the opportunity to obtain goods or services without the animal’s presence.

So there is a little gray area if the service animal is not well trained.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Nov, 2015 08:52 am
@neologist,
Only if he is house broken and under control he is ok.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Nov, 2015 08:58 am
@Tes yeux noirs,
That is true regarding the letter - not necessarily a mental health but a doctor - do you know how easy it is to get such a letter? You can get prescription medication over the phone without actually meeting a doctor - do you know how many doctors for a small fee will issue such a letter?

Also this US Service Dog business that will provide you a letter and register your service animal states that a letter is needed, but they do not require it to register the pet. So basically you can register the pet as emotional service animal with them without a letter. Granted it is not legal without the letter, but is the average landlord going to ask for a medical letter if you have a registration?

In case you are interested in registering your pet.

http://registerservicedogs.com/
0 Replies
 
Tes yeux noirs
 
  2  
Reply Fri 20 Nov, 2015 09:05 am
Service animals are different from emotional support ones.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Nov, 2015 09:06 am
@ossobuco,
In regard to allergies which is also addressed seems to be too bad...

◾Allergies and fear of dogs are not valid reasons for denying access or refusing service to people using service animals. When a person who is allergic to dog dander and a person who uses a service animal must spend time in the same room or facility, for example, in a school classroom or at a homeless shelter, they both should be accommodated by assigning them, if possible, to different locations within the room or different rooms in the facility.

I love dogs and animals so it isn't too much an issue with me and if they animal is well-behaved I have no issue. To me it is one thing being in a public place where you might just be around the animal for a short period of time - thus the allergy/fear or whatever is short lived.

But for something longer term it could be very impactful to another person's rights/health. I just see this as causing a huge problem with other people's rights - ie allergies/increasing a landlord's expenses such as higher insurance (whether it is right or not on the insurance co.) for high risk breeds.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Nov, 2015 09:08 am
@Tes yeux noirs,
Yes they are - but either one can be lied about - that is the point I am making.

The funny thing is there is less proof needed for service animals than an emotional support animal but a service animal has more areas they are legally allowed to have access.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Nov, 2015 04:49 pm
Ok so now they are advertising about how to get a doctor's note for this - I happen to be on Trivia Crack and this ad pulled up for Dogtor.net - it says having trouble finding a place to rent because of your pet...and it goes on about just a few easy steps and a few dollars we will provide you a doctor's note so no rental can deny you.
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