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Can anyone help translate a phrase into Ancient Greek ?

 
 
Aris
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Nov, 2004 09:41 am
HofT wrote:
OK, I managed to understand just enough to get to the site:
http://www.tlg.uci.edu/

but my browser (with only the standard math fonts in addition to ASCII characters) can't read the Greek texts there. Since I'm travelling and have a firewall which won't let me download anything I can't install new fonts now, will look at the site again when I'm back. I also can't post easily on public sites so pls excuse me if I don't reply to questions for a while.

Hey, I disappear for days on end myself and I hardly expect you to be rushing to answer back. Whenever either one of us is able to and feels like responding, we may keep in touch about things like this Smile
0 Replies
 
HofT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2004 07:23 am
Aris - I managed to get the text of your posted e-mail translated into English. On the symbolic linguistics part I cannot comment other than quote the saying "The Greeks had a word for it" - seems they really did!

But on the math part it seems this text was written by a none-too-careful journalist. 490,000 is not one hundredth of 6m >>
"...δηλαδή ως γλώσσα είναι μόλις το ένα εκατοστό της δικής μας..."
>> it's more like a tenth.
0 Replies
 
Aris
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Nov, 2004 10:07 am
Yes, 490,000 is hardly one hundredth of 6 million, is it. Thanx for taking the time to look into it and also for the TLG link; it seems most interesting and I will enjoy checking it out Very Happy
0 Replies
 
HofT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Nov, 2004 01:13 pm
I also thought that ancient Greek is the most mathematical language I know, with German second.

You will have heard of Heidegger, a very great classicist, who particularly studied the fragments that came down to us from the pre-Socratics as key to all philosophy.

"....As shown by the Greek word for truth, A-letheia (the alpha-privative + Lethe,, the river of forgetting), truth is primordially a kind of "un-concealment," a "dis-closing" or manifestation of presence which in fact any correspondence theory of truth must implicitly presuppose."

http://orpheus.ucsd.edu/eands/heid.html

That simple observation in '"a" + "lethe"' is part of the magic of Greek. It's lost in the Latin "veritas" even though that word is the exact translation, and lost down the line in all the European languages that followed - except for modern Greek, where it still exists and still means the same thing.

Pythagoras was the pre-Socratic philosopher best known to mathematicians but Heidegger and others trace the dawn of Western thought to Heraclitus, Anaximander and Parmenides. Details, here:
http://www.webcom.com/paf/grk/hgreek.html
0 Replies
 
Algis Kemezys
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 May, 2005 08:38 am
In Greek the word for view is Thea and for goddess it's Thea with the accent on the final a.
0 Replies
 
HofT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 May, 2005 08:47 am
Algis - thanks for following up!

I'm logged into an overseas server for ancient Greek texts and unfortunately can't post in Greek characters until this problem >
_________________________________________________________

Serverfehler!
Die Anfrage kann nicht beantwortet werden, da im Server ein interner Fehler aufgetreten ist.
Fehlermeldung:
malformed header from script. Bad header=<html>: perscoll
Sofern Sie dies für eine Fehlfunktion des Servers halten, informieren Sie bitte den Webmaster hierüber.
Error 500
www.perseus.tufts.edu
Fri 20 May 2005 10:02:33 AM EDT
Apache/2.0.40 (Red Hat Linux)
__________________________________________________________

> is finally fixed. You're on your own with the Greek alphabet, but btw where did the query for "goddess" appear?!
0 Replies
 
Algis Kemezys
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 May, 2005 08:52 am
I heard bill gates is using ancient greek for his programming because it is so scientifically exact.
0 Replies
 
Algis Kemezys
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 May, 2005 08:56 am
Wow some of these pages with reference material is truely fantastic.Thanx HofT.
HofT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 May, 2005 09:33 am
Algis - got part of the site to work, see what came up on a search for "thea" in Greek characters:

θέα (LSJ, Middle Liddell) 2418 4.98 5 0.01 678.00 1.40
θεάφιον (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θέαφος (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεαγενής (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεαγγελεύς (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεάγγελις (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεάγισσα (LSJ, LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θέαγον (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱγός (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾰγωγέω (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾰγωγία (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾰγωγός (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θέαινα (LSJ, Middle Liddell, Autenrieth) 6 0.01 6 0.01 6 0.01
Θεαι̂ος (Slater) 1 0.00 1 0.00 1 0.00
θεαίτητος (LSJ) 112 0.23 112 0.23 112 0.23
θέαμα (LSJ, Middle Liddell) 70 0.14 68 0.14 68.67 0.14
θεάμων (LSJ, Middle Liddell) 0 0 0 0 0 0
Θεανδρίδαι (Slater) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεανὴ (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
Θεα̂νώ (Autenrieth) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεανω̂σται (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεάομαι (LSJ, Middle Liddell) 2989 6.16 48 0.10 1139.33 2.35
θεαορός (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεάρεστος (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεα̂ρία (Slater) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱρία (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
Θεα̂́ριον (Slater) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεάριον (LSJ, Middle Liddell) 4 0.01 0 0 2 0.00
θεάριος (LSJ) 4 0.01 0 0 2 0.00
θεᾱρίς (LSJ) 1 0.00 0 0 0.50 0.00
Θεα̂ρίων (Slater) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱροδοκία (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱροδόκος (LSJ, LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεαρός (LSJ, LSJ, Middle Liddell) 1 0.00 0 0 0.50 0.00
θέᾱσις (LSJ) 4 0.01 0 0 1.33 0.00
θεαστικός (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱτέον (LSJ) 9 0.02 0 0 4.50 0.01
θεατέος (Middle Liddell) 9 0.02 0 0 4.50 0.01
θεατής (LSJ, Middle Liddell) 100 0.21 16 0.03 58 0.12
θεᾱτικός (LSJ) 1 0.00 1 0.00 1 0.00
θεατός (LSJ, Middle Liddell) 88 0.18 4 0.01 46 0.09
θεᾱτρει̂ον (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱ́τρια (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱτρίδιον (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεατρικός (LSJ, Middle Liddell) 5 0.01 5 0.01 5 0.01
θεᾱτρισμός (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱτριστής (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεατρίζω (LSJ, Middle Liddell) 1 0.00 1 0.00 1 0.00
θεᾱτροειδής (LSJ) 4 0.01 4 0.01 4 0.01
θεᾱτροκοπία (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱτροκόπος (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱτροκορασία (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱτροκρασία (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱτροκρᾰτία (LSJ) 1 0.00 1 0.00 1 0.00
θεᾱτροκῠνηγέσιον (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱτροκῠνήγιον (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱτρομᾰνέω (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱτρόμορφος (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θέατρον (LSJ, Middle Liddell) 240 0.49 240 0.49 240 0.49
θεᾱτροποιός (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱτροπώλης (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεᾱτροτορύνη (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεατρώδης (LSJ) 0 0 0 0 0 0
θεατρώνης (LSJ) 1 0.00 1 0.00 1 0.00
θεάω (LSJ, LSJ) 7485 15.43 1 0.00 2810.63 5.79
θεάζω (LSJ)

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/resolveform?lookup=qea&type=begin&lang=greek&searchText=qea&options=Sort+Results+Alphabetically&formentry=1&display=&display=UTF8&lang=greek

___________________________________________________________

And that's only a portion of the total words containing "thea" Smile
0 Replies
 
HofT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 May, 2005 09:37 am
P.S. the numbers after the words indicate frequencies in which they're encountered in texts included on that particular database.

The semantics part you mention in re Microsoft is related to the incredible precision of ancient Greek, encountered in no other recorded language - with the exclusion of mathematics, if it can be counted as a language. Have fun Smile
0 Replies
 
Algis Kemezys
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 May, 2005 09:41 am
HofT Your a good A2K buddy indeed. Try this for a real explosion of material, Zeus or as he's also know as Dias. Try Dias which means god.
0 Replies
 
alexfot55
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 7 Jan, 2009 12:54 pm
@FEL,
in analogy to :
"cow eyed" =βοωπης (omega combines with "π")(Homeric)
"cat" ="γαλη"
"cat eyed" = "γαλοψος" (omicron compines with "ψ" and "π")
= "γαληωψ"
= "γαληοπος"
"yellow" = "ωχρον"
"yellow eyed" =" ωχρωπης "
However this is a "mechanistic" approach since ancient Greek extends in avery long period and has many variations and intense evolution and artistic word creation.
0 Replies
 
alexfot55
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jan, 2009 12:58 pm
@FEL,
in analogy to :
"cow eyed" =βοωπης (omega combines with "π")(Homeric)
"cat" ="γαλη"
"cat eyed" = "γαλοψος" (omicron compines with "ψ" and "π")
= "γαληωψ"
= "γαληοπος"
"yellow" = "ωχρον"
"yellow eyed" =" ωχρωπης "
"gold eyed" ="χρυσωπης"
However this is a "mechanistic" approach since ancient Greek extends in avery long period and has many variations and intense evolution and artistic word creation.
0 Replies
 
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Jun, 2009 01:30 pm
@Algis Kemezys,
testing for Greek alphabet:

Quote:


It works on A2K, finally, and the Perseus site has been upgraded as well:
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3atext%3a1999.01.0133

Btw, I'm the former HofT, was gone from this site for over a year and could no longer access my old account, whence the name change.
0 Replies
 
 

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