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Can you translate this quote in Spanish to better English than Google Translate please?

 
 
Reply Thu 3 Sep, 2015 04:55 pm
I tried getting a translation for this in translate.google.com

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/46/56/c7/4656c71c9468e0a5c3e6b5989da3cbbe.jpg

And got this:

Quote:
You say fat and quote you diet , but you say gross and I see that holds a book. ️Anónimo


Which almost hints at some sort of meaning. Can you do a better job?

muchos gracias!
 
View best answer, chosen by hingehead
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Thu 3 Sep, 2015 05:01 pm
@hingehead,
Quote:
Which almost hints at some sort of meaning. Can you do a better job?

No sir, I can not do a better job translating that text than Google Translate.
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
  Selected Answer
 
  6  
Reply Thu 3 Sep, 2015 05:13 pm
They tell you Fatso and you go on a diet, but they tell you Thick and I don't see you grabbing a book.
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Sep, 2015 05:46 pm
@fbaezer,
Awesome! Thanks!
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Sep, 2015 05:49 pm
@fbaezer,
Hey, am I right that 'gorda' means fat woman? As opposed 'gordo'; fat man.

So the quote is specifically aimed at women?
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Sep, 2015 05:55 pm
@fbaezer,
And 'bruta' I thought meant 'ugly'. Or am I getting that from Italian?
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  3  
Reply Thu 3 Sep, 2015 06:06 pm
@hingehead,
It's not specifically aimed at women, but it is on the femenine form.

And yes, brutta is ugly in Italian, bruta means dumb, thick, stupid in Spanish.
One of the many false cognates between those two romance languages.

Just for kicks: largo means long in Spanish and it means wide in Italian.
fbaezer
 
  4  
Reply Thu 3 Sep, 2015 06:11 pm
@fbaezer,
Dona is do-nut in Spanish, while donna is woman in Italian.

A fellow Mexican in Italy went to a coffee shop and asked for "un capuccino e una dona". The tender replied: "Well, the capuccino I can serve you, but the donna, you have to find her yourself".
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Sep, 2015 10:44 pm
@fbaezer,
I have another one, that seems to be

I love the vacuum cleaner.
To whom?

http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/b8/ac/2a/b8ac2ab18ed4e901ab10fcf759985f68.jpg
fbaezer
 
  2  
Reply Wed 9 Sep, 2015 10:13 am
@hingehead,
It's Italian, and puny.

"Love, pass the vacuum cleaner"
"To whom?"
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Sep, 2015 10:15 am
I don't know if you pass, run or push the vacuum cleaner in Australia.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Sep, 2015 10:28 am
@fbaezer,
Picturing this...
maybe it's one of those small sized vacuum cleaners.

fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Sep, 2015 10:40 am
@ossobuco,
In Europe just about everything is smaller than in the US.
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Wed 9 Sep, 2015 10:43 am
@fbaezer,
ah a pun

punny


Honey, run the vacuum.

To whom?
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Wed 9 Sep, 2015 10:45 am
@fbaezer,
http://poppygall.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/Jackalope4-1024x648.jpg
0 Replies
 
 

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