Reply Tue 2 Jun, 2015 06:27 pm
A good many others assert that the decision was made to take one path
(comparatively minor cuts of key players at the top of the Baath party
and the military) and that this decision was, in the words of one cabinet
official, “lost in translation” on the way to Bremer.

What does "to take one path" mean here?
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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 1,054 • Replies: 10
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View best answer, chosen by PennyChan
McTag
  Selected Answer
 
  2  
Reply Thu 4 Jun, 2015 12:39 am
@PennyChan,

It means to "(make) comparatively minor cuts of key players at the top of the Baath party and the military."

In other words, to adopt a single strategy.
Bazza6
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 4 Jun, 2015 06:50 am
@PennyChan,
Of those available to take, "to take ONE of the paths" (comparatively minor cuts of key players) open to them.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jun, 2015 06:58 am
Bazza is not a native speaker if English, and has no business attempting to advise others on Enghlish language usage.
oristarA
 
  0  
Reply Thu 4 Jun, 2015 09:38 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Bazza is not a native speaker if English, and has no business attempting to advise others on Enghlish language usage.


What is "a native speaker if English"? If or of?
Miller
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 4 Jun, 2015 09:46 am
@PennyChan,
"What does "to take one path" mean here? "

Means one possible path of action. Also suggests that more than one path may be possible, but let us try one, at first and if necessary, we'll move on to another path of action.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 4 Jun, 2015 09:49 am
@oristarA,
A native speaker would probably mean a person who has learned English as a language at an early age and probably (?) at the time, he/she was learning English as the sole language in a home, where English was the sole language.

For example, my grandmother grew-up in a home where German and English were both spoken. She learned German and English as a child, but as an adult, she never spoke German. She spoken only English.

She was a proud German-American and a very good woman.
oristarA
 
  0  
Reply Fri 5 Jun, 2015 08:36 am
@Miller,
That's it. Cool.
But Setanta has given us a myth - "if English". It sounds more than just a slip of tongue.
McTag
 
  2  
Reply Fri 5 Jun, 2015 11:23 am
@oristarA,

I think he meant to write "of".

There is another meaning/ usage possible, but seems a very unlikely choice here.
0 Replies
 
Ionus
 
  0  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2015 04:08 am
@Setanta,
Quote:
Bazza is not a native speaker if English, and has no business attempting to advise others on Enghlish language usage.
Now you take Set, he has heard of the English language and intends to one day learn some of it .
0 Replies
 
PennyChan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jun, 2015 01:57 am
@McTag,
Thank you!!!
0 Replies
 
 

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