10
   

A nickel can be five bucks?

 
 
SMickey
 
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 06:24 pm
While watching the sitcom Friends, I ran into a word 'nickel'.
I'll simply jot down the episode.

Joey built a cupboard himself which his roomy, Chandler, hates a lot.
Determined to sell it, Joey is having a negotiation with a stranger.
Joey says the unit is deep enough for a grown man to fit in, and if it's not true,
he's willing to knock FIVE bucks off the price of it.

After saying that, Joey gets into the cupboard himself,
and the stranger locks it, and then he steals several things.

When the guy who takes advantage of Joey's stupid act is about to leave,
Joey cries, 'Hey, a nickel!'

Here's the video.

http://www.jdaenglish.com/learn-english-with-friends-5/

What's puzzling to me is what Joey meant by 'a nickel'.
Joey did say he'd knock 5 dollars, not 5 cents, didn't he?

A nickel is obvioiusly five cents, right?

I looked up the dictionary to see if a nickel can be 5 cents as well as 5 dollars. There was nothing like it.

Then, what on earth did Joey say 'a nickel' for?
I'd have ignored it had he said 'Hey, five bucks!' as he had uttered 'five bucks.'

Is all this to describe Joey is such a foolish person who can't tell five bucks from a nickel? I'm dying to know.

Could you guys please help me figure out?
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 06:40 pm
@SMickey,
Yes, $0.05 is called a nickel.

However, slang for $5 is a nickel (betting slang). Also $5 is called a fin. Crazy American English, huh?!
layman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 06:56 pm
@Ragman,
Yeah, and $10 is a "dime." A twenty is a "dub" (two, or double, dimes). Bills in general are "dead presidents," and particular names also designate the denomination of the currency. A "Franklin," or, more commonly, a "Benjamin," for example, is a $100 bill.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 07:13 pm
@Ragman,
Five dollar bills were called fins because, in the middle of the 19th century, American banknotes sported roman numerals. So, V becomes a fin, X ($10) becomes a sawbuck, XX ($20) becomes a double sawbuck, and a hundred collar bill was referred to as a "C note."

http://www.philadelphiafed.org/education/teachers/publications/symbols-on-american-money/_images/12_windham-bank-private-note.jpg

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/423124.jpg
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 07:14 pm
@Setanta,
Excellent, Tnx VM, Set.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 07:39 pm
@Setanta,
Furthermore, a person not of this culture might not know that a sawbuck is a name for a carpenter's or woodworker's support on which someone can saw a panel or piece of wood.
layman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 07:49 pm
@Ragman,
Quote:
Furthermore, a person not of this culture might not know that a sawbuck is a name for a carpenter's or woodworker's support on which someone can saw a panel or piece of wood.


Usually called a "saw horse" rather than a "saw buck," these days.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  3  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 07:53 pm
@SMickey,
SMickey wrote:

While watching the sitcom Friends, I ran into a word 'nickel'.
I'll simply jot down the episode.

Joey built a cupboard himself which his roomy, Chandler, hates a lot.
Determined to sell it, Joey is having a negotiation with a stranger.
Joey says the unit is deep enough for a grown man to fit in, and if it's not true,
he's willing to knock FIVE bucks off the price of it.

After saying that, Joey gets into the cupboard himself,
and the stranger locks it, and then he steals several things.

When the guy who takes advantage of Joey's stupid act is about to leave,
Joey cries, 'Hey, a nickel!'

Here's the video.

http://www.jdaenglish.com/learn-english-with-friends-5/

What's puzzling to me is what Joey meant by 'a nickel'.
Joey did say he'd knock 5 dollars, not 5 cents, didn't he?

A nickel is obvioiusly five cents, right?

I looked up the dictionary to see if a nickel can be 5 cents as well as 5 dollars. There was nothing like it.

Then, what on earth did Joey say 'a nickel' for?
I'd have ignored it had he said 'Hey, five bucks!' as he had uttered 'five bucks.'

Is all this to describe Joey is such a foolish person who can't tell five bucks from a nickel? I'm dying to know.

Could you guys please help me figure out?


Joey was the dumb one. Instead of realizing that he'd been tricked, he got excited about finding a nickel in the cupboard.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 08:08 pm
@Setanta,
So, if that is the case, how does a $1 dollar note get called a buck? Does this have anything to do with the Buccaneer?

Major Digression

Surprisingly, the name of Buccaneer I thought was derived from those pirates that roamed the seas in Caribbean and Florida coasts. But it turns out they, in turn, got their name from the smoking chambers or wooden frames that these pirates used to smoke meats ...typically manatees.
"The term buccaneer derives from the Caribbean Arawak word buccan, a wooden frame for smoking meat, preferably manatee. From this derived the French word boucane and hence the name boucanier for French hunters who used such frames to smoke meat from feral cattle and pigs on Hispaniola (now Haiti and the Dominican Republic). English colonists anglicised the word boucanier to buccaneer"
layman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 08:15 pm
@Ragman,
"Bread" is money, so is it's raw form, dough. It takes dough to make bread, so what good is a dough (doe) without a buck? Hence: Buck.
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 08:27 pm
@layman,
You're totally winging it.

The following article is what I researched:

BUCK


Meaning -(1) A dollar.
(2) An amount of money: working overtime to make an extra buck.

It is not specifically for Dollar bill alone, any currency can be refered with the term BUCL-
Origin: 1748

The Indians taught the European settlers the value of a buck. In the eighteenth century, that meant a deerskin, used for trading in its own right and as a unit of value for trading anything else. So in 1748, while in Indian territory on a visit to the Ohio, Conrad Weiser wrote in his journal, "He has been robbed of the value of 300 Bucks"; and later, "Every cask of Whiskey shall be sold...for 5 Bucks in your town."

In the next century, with deerskins less often serving as a medium of exchange, the buck passed to the dollar. A Sacramento, California, newspaper reported this court judgment in 1856: "Bernard, assault and battery upon Wm. Croft, mulcted in the sum of twenty bucks."

Inflation has hit buck in the later twentieth century, so that in big-bucks transactions buck can mean one hundred or even one hundred thousand dollars. But sometimes a buck is still just a buck.

Passing the buck is a different matter. In the late nineteenth century, poker players designated the dealer with a marker they called the buck, apparently so named because it was often a knife with a handle made of buckhorn. When responsibility for dealing changed to the next player, they passed the buck. "
layman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 08:30 pm
@Ragman,
Quote:
You're totally winging it.


Busted again, eh?
0 Replies
 
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Mar, 2015 12:43 am
There is, actually, a difference between a sawbuck and a sawhorse. No doubt why we don't call a tenspot a sawhorse.
layman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Mar, 2015 01:03 am
@neologist,
Quote:
There is, actually, a difference between a sawbuck and a sawhorse. No doubt why we don't call a tenspot a sawhorse.


Well, sure, Neo, they're different, but, ya see, they're also the same. Actually, if you wanna believe Set's pictures, we don't call a dime a sawbuck because there is no longer a roman numeral on our $10 bills.
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Mar, 2015 01:33 am
You should try it over here.

£5 = Fiver
£10 = Tenner
£20 = Score
£25 = Pony
£100 = Ton
£500 = Monkey
£1000 = Grand.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Mar, 2015 02:28 am
This is the simplest image of a sawbuck that i could find. It may not look like a sawhorse, but it serves the same purpose.

http://www.ericsprojects.com/cpg/albums/userpics/10001/P1010102-complete.JPG
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Mar, 2015 02:58 am
Here's some more for you. The reason we say two bits is because the Holy Roman Emperor was a Spaniard--well, sort of (no, not really). The Spanish busily ruined the economies of Europe by importing tons and tons of silver, without understanding the principle of inflation. Although no one else understood it either, not intellectually, merchants instinctively understood the falling value of silver coins, and adjusted their prices accordingly. Europe was exposed to centuries of high level inflation, until the Spanish had imported so much silver, that bringing in a few tons more each year no longer mattered.

In 1519, succumbing to lavish bribery, the German electors elected King Carlos of Spain the Holy Roman Emperor. This was at a time when silver coinage was still worth something, and as he now ruled (at least notionally) most of central Europe, the Spanish silver coins were called thalers, which was the common large silver coin in German states at the time. That's where we get our word dollar.

Not many of those coins, however, were left in the new world. Carlos and his successor, Phillip, had wars to fight on god's behalf, and needed lots of cash. In the new world countries, the Spanish "thalers," the Spanish dollars, were actually more common than smaller silver coins or copper coins. So people made change by cutting them in half. They made smaller change by cutting the halves in half, and even smaller change by cutting those in half. Eight pieces from each coin, and Spanish dollars became known as pieces of eight. The slivers of the cut up coins became known as bits.

Two bits, four bits, six bits a dollar
All for our side stand up and holler!


A piece of eight:

https://d1u1p2xjjiahg3.cloudfront.net/7fea4802-1a12-433b-a6b9-d239b9705a38.jpg . . . https://d1u1p2xjjiahg3.cloudfront.net/6c083d7a-4924-4113-a6c8-2fe969751a79.jpg
layman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Mar, 2015 03:04 am
@Setanta,
Well, then, that explains that, sho nuff.

What I wanna know is this here:

Where have all the two-bit hos gone?

Cop to woman: This man claims you battered him, is that true?
Woman: Well, yeah, it is. The slimebag called me a two-bit ho, so I hit him.
Cop: With what?
Woman: A sack of quarters.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Mar, 2015 03:38 am
@Lordyaswas,

what's quid?
Setanta
 
  3  
Reply Tue 10 Mar, 2015 04:10 am
@Region Philbis,
Region Philbis wrote:


what's quid?


Quid pro quo is Latin for "this for that," and quid has become a slang term for one pound sterling.
 

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