15
   

What does it mean to be French?

 
 
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jun, 2015 10:48 am
@Foofie,
Quote:
It seems to be so exhausting to be truly French.

Yes but it's better than the alternative...
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jun, 2015 06:55 pm
@Olivier5,
Naturally, from a French perspective.
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2015 02:23 pm
@Foofie,
Of course, and similarly it's only seem "tiring to be French" from a non-French perspective... From our perspective it's not being French which must be hard and tiring.
Tes yeux noirs
 
  2  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2015 02:56 pm
@Olivier5,
Quote:
From our perspective it's not being French which must be hard and tiring.

Don't the Germans have a saying, to denote extreme happiness, "happy as God in France"?
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2015 03:00 pm
@Tes yeux noirs,
Yes they do. And many Germans (and Dutch, and British people) come and retire in France. We must be doing something right...
timur
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2015 03:02 pm
@Tes yeux noirs,
No, they say: Glücklich wie Gott in Frankreich! Mr. Green

However, I'm told that the real saying is: "Leben wie Gott in Frankreich", which means "live like God in France".
0 Replies
 
Vernon of Prague
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2015 03:22 pm
@Olivier5,
Quote:
Yes they do. And many Germans (and Dutch, and British people) come and retire in France. We must be doing something right...


welfare system Smile
Tes yeux noirs
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2015 03:42 pm
I am trying to think of a reason why Vernon of Prague is such a "jerkwad". The most persuasive one I can come up with is that he is aged about 13.
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2015 03:58 pm
@Vernon of Prague,
Indeed, a good health system is a draw for retirees. More generally, a good quality of life.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2015 03:58 pm
@Tes yeux noirs,
Indeed he comes across as a bit immature.
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2015 04:32 pm
@Vernon of Prague,
Vernon of Prague wrote:

Quote:
Yes they do. And many Germans (and Dutch, and British people) come and retire in France. We must be doing something right...


welfare system Smile


This shows what an idiot you are, bumfluff.

If you watch the news, you will see that many economic migrants are travelling all the way through France, to risk their lives stowing away on Lorries at Calais, in order to get over to Britain, primarily for our welfare system.

And indeed, Germany experiences the same influx, as does Holland.

The reason why Brits are so keen on going to retire in France is primarily because it's much, much cheaper buying property there, and there is a better probability of getting sunshine if you settle south of the earth's cloud cap, which extends down as far as about Paris.
Paris usually has as much, often more, rain than London. South of that is a different matter.

One reason that the French way of life appears idyllic is because the weather allows them more outdoor leisure, which is always a major plus. Add the fact that non French retirees can sell up and not only buy an equivalent property in France, but bang a few hundred grand in the bank at the same time, it's a no brainer.

The way things are going, in about fifty years, most property in France will be owned by non French "immigrants".

I think it may soon change its name to something like Southenglandshire.

Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2015 10:15 pm
@Lordyaswas,
Lordyaswas wrote:
The way things are going, in about fifty years, most property in France will be owned by non French "immigrants".
There are already regions in Normandy and Brittany, where English is the common language.
Lordyaswas
 
  2  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2015 11:38 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Ah yes, there is also Dordogneshire, etc.


English is the default language in most of Europe now, and I hear it much much more when I'm there, compared to how it was back in the early 80's.

I read an article the other day, I think it was about Denmark, where they are trying to ban English in various establishments because they are in genuine fear of losing their own language.

It is obviously the new computer driven world that is causing most of this, but nevertheless, like it or not, English will probably prevail in Europe over the coming decades, before we all have to learn Chinese in preparation for the 22nd Century.
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 05:55 am
@Lordyaswas,
Not to worry. Retirees die fast and they don't reproduce.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 07:23 am
@Lordyaswas,
Lordyaswas wrote:
English is the default language in most of Europe now, and I hear it much much more when I'm there, compared to how it was back in the early 80's.
I actually didn't think about how many people can speak English.
I've stayed already since the early 90's as the only French speaking guest in a couple of chambres d'hôtes. And it has always been an advantage in daily life Wink
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 08:15 am
@Walter Hinteler,
English is now terminally spied on. La seule façon de parler librement, c’est de parler dans une autre langue.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 11:26 am
In all NYC high schools, one's foreign language requirement, for a diploma that readied one for college, had (past tense) a choice of usually French or Spanish. Occasionally, Italian. Now, I believe it might be few that offer French. Spanish is the default foreign language for students.

Asians born here speak English as though they always had family here. Spanish speaking youth speak English well; however, in my opinion, there are some that do not lose a certain accent, due possibly to speaking Spanish to an older generation?

Anyway, English is the dominant language, and will likely remain so, since a large demographic in the U.S. is of British descent. Plus, English speaking Canadians might migrate/visit the States, and no one can descern that they are Canadian. They just speak like U.S. citizens.

By the way, in 1910 there were NYC neighborhoods whose public schools had one page in English and the other page in German. After WWI the German community gave up their desire to have a bi-lingual society.

And, the Hispanic community (largest of Mexican descent) celebrates Cinco de Mayo with great gusto. Something about kicking the French out of Mexico.

French might be popular amongst those of a particular (upper) crust, that considers it part of their more cultivated persona. The masses speak either standard English (aka, standard grammer), or a variant that reflects slight different meanings for words. Possibly reflecting regional (colloquial) or cultural differences.

French is popular, in my opinion, as much as art museums are to the masses. Only immigrant Haitians speak their Patois. But in NYC, one can even hear African languages spoken by people. Naturally, French tourists speak French, and have some sort of aversion to speaking English, in my opinion. Yet, they find the visit interesting? Perhaps, they like tall buildings? They can also go to Asian cities for that, these days.

timur
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 11:49 am
I've seen you uttering these same worn out memes, same old gripes that you keep based on your anecdotal experience.


Foofie wrote:
and no one can descern that they are Canadian. They just speak like U.S. citizens.
I hope they write better than this..

Foofie wrote:
The masses speak either standard English (aka, standard grammer),
Hopefully better than you write.



Foofie wrote:
And, the Hispanic community (largest of Mexican descent) celebrates Cinco de Mayo with great gusto. Something about kicking the French out of Mexico.
I interviewed a lot of them and very rarely did they know what the Cinco the Mayo stands for.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 11:57 am
@timur,
Well, I'm speaking from the perspective of a New Yorker. You know, that island off of the coast of the U.S. mainland. Regardless, all your compliments are gratefully accepted.
0 Replies
 
timur
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 12:16 pm
Foofie wrote:
Well, I'm speaking from the perspective of a New Yorker.
Do you think it's better than the perspective of a Parisian, a Londoner or a Berliner?


Foofie wrote:
You know, that island off of the coast of the U.S. mainland.
Stop pretending, king's little dog, you know zilch about geography.


Foofie wrote:
Regardless, all your compliments are gratefully accepted.

You are welcome..
0 Replies
 
 

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