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California adopts 'yes means yes' sexual assault rule

 
 
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2014 11:34 pm
@firefly,
Quote:
“I’ve read a few articles about it. I think it’s a really positive thing and I’m really glad to see the White House taking a strong stance,” Chris Priore, a student at Stony Brook University in New York, said. “I think it’s really good that it’s not just talking to the person who’s the victim and saying hey, this is how you can get out of this situation, and putting it on them — instead it’s making it so the whole community is culpable for it.”


So glad to see that the millions of dollars our government has spent through the VAWA to grow groups of men who are willing to claim support for the feminists anti men campaign is getting at least a few results. We all know what they are up against, stupid men willing to sell out other men to the men haters dont grow in trees you know.
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2014 11:41 pm
@hawkeye10,
Men will do most anything for good pussy, but in my day there were limits.
One Eyed Mind
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 04:42 am
@firefly,
Indeed, college is but a branch to a destructive tree.

The numbers may even be higher considering such acts and events are traumatic.

The thing is, 1/5 in women "of the world", is not the same as 1/5 in women "of college".

Do you understand that everything changes when you change your sample size? The bigger the number, means there will be more factors and instances than a smaller number, even though a smaller case may have the same fraction as the bigger case.

There's a difference between 25/100 and 250,000/1,000,000
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 11:37 am
Just 2 days after leading the Gators to a come from behind victory over Tennessee, Florida quarterback Treon Harris was suspended from the team pending an ongoing investigation of an alleged sexual assault.
Quote:
“We have no tolerance for sexual assault on our campus,” UF President Bernie Machen said in a statement. “The university is committed to providing a safe and inclusive environment for every member of the UF community. We must strive to protect all of our students from sexual harassment and assault, and do everything in our power to promote a safe learning environment.”

Things have changed since Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston was accused of the same.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 12:05 pm
I listened to an interview on this subject earlier today.

This may have been discussed earlier in the thread but I hadn't realized how very different the definitions of sexual assault can be across jurisdictions in the U.S. , with individual universities layering their own definitions on top of state and federal definitions.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 12:08 pm
@ehBeth,
I wonder how it is in Canada?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 12:11 pm
@panzade,
Apparently we've had a 'yes means yes' law at the federal level for about 5 years <edit - much longer>. Here, the federal law outranks everything below it so everyone has to apply affirmative consent.

I found the link to the podcast

starts at about 4o seconds, runs 24 minutes

http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20141006_71876.mp3

Quote:
Savannah Badalich turned the trauma of sexual assault into campus activism with a fight that led to a California law called Affirmative Consent. Students are debating if Canada needs this policy but we already have the equivalent of Affirmative Consent.


http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent/listen/
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 12:18 pm
@ehBeth,
http://www.questia.com/library/journal/1G1-343944890/affirmative-sexual-consent-in-canadian-law-jurisprudence

Quote:
Requirements for affirmative sexual consent, or communicated voluntary agreement, were explicitly proposed in Canadian legal literature in 1986, (1) codified in the 1992 Criminal Code amendments, (2) and recognized as an essential element of the common law and statutory definitions of sexual consent by the Supreme Court of Canada in a series of cases decided since 1994.
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 12:45 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

http://www.questia.com/library/journal/1G1-343944890/affirmative-sexual-consent-in-canadian-law-jurisprudence

Quote:
Requirements for affirmative sexual consent, or communicated voluntary agreement, were explicitly proposed in Canadian legal literature in 1986, (1) codified in the 1992 Criminal Code amendments, (2) and recognized as an essential element of the common law and statutory definitions of sexual consent by the Supreme Court of Canada in a series of cases decided since 1994.



As if that matters in CANADA! You people are too nice to do anything sexual till you have checked with your partner at lease three times.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 12:47 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
This may have been discussed earlier in the thread but I hadn't realized how very different the definitions of sexual assault can be across jurisdictions in the U.S. , with individual universities layering their own definitions on top of state and federal definitions.


and yet for 4 years now Firefly has rambled on " but EVERYONE knows what consent is".

She also was claiming for years that the definition of consent has not changed. Dont think she will trot that lie out anymore.
One Eyed Mind
 
  4  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 01:07 pm
@hawkeye10,
Clearly not "everyone" does.

Going back to my post when I mentioned how spanking a fine lady on the ass is considered rape for some absurd reason - my guess is emotions running rampant.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 01:35 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:

and yet for 4 years now Firefly has rambled on " but EVERYONE knows what consent is".

She also was claiming for years that the definition of consent has not changed. Dont think she will trot that lie out anymore.

The meaning of "consent" hasn't changed--it still means freely and willingly agree to. Outside of some colleges, who've adopted "Yes means yes", it's considered to be present if there is a lack of protest or resistance. But that could mean someone is unconscious, or semi-comatose, or coerced, not freely, willingly agreeing.

In case you didn't notice, we weren't using "Yes means yes" 4 years ago. Definitions of "consent" were pretty much the same from state to state. They still are.

You've yet to come up with a logical reason why an affirmative response is not an improvement, in terms of communication, particularly for young, less socially and sexually experienced adults, and particularly where the goal is to reduce sexual assaults. And I don't see that the students themselves are the ones making the most noise about it. Most of them already pay attention to a partner's feedback, and they want an affirmative response.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 01:55 pm
@hawkeye10,
Since I was talking about definitions about sexual assault, I have no idea why you think your comment on the definition of consent is related in any way.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 02:00 pm
@ehBeth,
I think Canada has been ahead of the U.S. in abolishing the offense of "rape" and replacing it with degrees of "sexual assault". Another poster in the rape thread really helped to convince me of that. It's the only way of really eliminating gender bias in the laws and focusing on the assaultive nature of the crime. So it doesn't surprise me to learn you've been ahead of us on affirmative consent as well.
Quote:
Until it was amended in 1982 the Criminal Code contained the offence of rape. The offence required proof that a man had sexual intercourse with a woman other than his wife without the woman's consent. It was punishable by up to life imprisonment. The offence of rape, perhaps more than any other offence, demonstrated the tensions arising in CRIMINAL LAW from conflicting principles: the presumption of innocence (and thus, the requirement that the Crown prove all of the elements of the offence beyond a reasonable doubt) and the need to protect potential victims and to punish offenders. The emotional and traumatic nature of the trial (which might include cross-examination of the complainant about her prior sexual conduct with the accused and others), aggravated by the feelings of shame and degradation suffered by a rape victim, may contribute to the fact that rape is an underreported crime. Sometimes the accused is a "friend" or relative, which leads to the imposition of even greater pressure upon the complainant.

Abolition of the Rape Offence

With the passing of Bill C-127, Parliament has abolished the offence of rape, replacing it with the offences of sexual assault. A major purpose of the change was to emphasize that the offence, although sexually related, was essentially a crime of violence, mostly against women. The legislation reflects this in establishing 3 categories of sexual assault: basic sexual assault (ie, sexual touching or sexual intercourse without consent) punishable by up to 10 years' imprisonment; sexual assault with a weapon or threatened violence, punishable by up to 14 years in prison; and aggravated sexual assault, in which the victim is wounded or disfigured, punishable by up to life imprisonment. The distinction between men and women in the idea that only men could commit rape was abolished, since sexual assault is a crime which either sex can commit; spousal immunity was ended (ie, sexual conduct between spouses must now be consensual); proof of vaginal penetration by the penis is no longer a requirement, and so failing to report the crime within a matter of hours (and certainly a day) is no longer fatal to the Crown's case because of insufficient evidence; and the doctrine of recent complaint was abolished so that failure to complain at the first reasonable opportunity no longer harms the complainant's credibility.
http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/sexual-assault/


With these new affirmative consent initiatives colleges are trying to prevent such crimes, but it's worth noting that Canada no longer uses the criminal offense of rape.
One Eyed Mind
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 02:01 pm
@firefly,
FF, I'm just going to say this now.

The problem with this, is that it's not solving the ISSUE. Sexual repression and perversion. This law isn't taking into consideration that women can lie by saying 'I said no, he forced me', which does happen.

The main problem is the massive sexual atmosphere surrounding our society. How hard it is to make a living in this hell hole - which means it's hard to find that someone. This pushes people to do stupid ****, like raping a girl for an easy bang. This society we live in cheats us and fucks us over, that people really find it hard to love again when they see the bullshit in religion and other "we're good people" practices. People have terrible role models. The society has terrible school systems. Everything has rules, systems and laws, but the entire society itself is the most unruly aspect behind it all. Children on one hand being told to obey, but on another hand nobody deals with their rotten attitudes. People are so lazy and stupid today, it makes my head want to explode and I'm sure plenty of men and women out there ******* their life up already chose the dark path because it's better than trying to be good in a society that's a serpent which speaks the angel's tongue and the sheep turn against you when you try to save them from the mad shepherd.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 02:21 pm
@panzade,
Quote:
Things have changed since Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston was accused of the same.


Yes, they had as before an investigation having been done let alone any charges the man is assume guilt of misconduct and is being punish on the word of a woman within hours.

In this case, they did not as yet have even have a Kangaroo college court hearing before leveling punishments.

Men are now are starting to be presume guilty at once when accused by a woman.

0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 02:21 pm
@firefly,
firefly wrote:
With these new affirmative consent initiatives colleges are trying to prevent such crimes, but it's worth noting that Canada no longer uses the criminal offense of rape.
Did the Canadian rapists emigrate ?
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 02:21 pm
@One Eyed Mind,
Quote:
This law isn't taking into consideration that women can lie by saying 'I said no, he forced me', which does happen.

The law doesn't take into account that men can lie by saying, "It was consensual, she wanted it". So? That's not it's purpose.

Take 2 Aspirin, maybe you'll feel better.
Miller
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 02:22 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

Men will do most anything for good pussy...


And I suppose you know this from experience....
0 Replies
 
One Eyed Mind
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2014 02:24 pm
@firefly,
Actually, no. Affirmative Consent is based entirely on the female saying yes. It doesn't matter what the male says.
 

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