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Another brick in the wall

 
 
milimi
 
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 03:55 am
Hello,

1) In the song Another Brick In The Wall, we can read "We don't need no education", what is the fonction of "no" in this sentence, it seems that "We don't need education" would have the same meaning?
Why is it useful to associate two negations :"don't" and "no"?

2) In the sentences : "hey teachers leave 'them' kids alone" or "leave 'us' kids alone", what is the role of the possessive adjectives 'them' and 'us'?
Could we not simply say : "leave 'the' kids alone"?

3) "All in all you're just another brick in the wall."

What is the meaning of 'all in all'?
Is it 'in the whole' or 'at the end'?

Thank you.
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Type: Question • Score: 6 • Views: 6,045 • Replies: 11

 
milimi
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 04:53 am
@milimi,
In 2), I mean 'possessive pronouns'.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 05:03 am
In one and two, the song writer is representing the language as it is commonly spoken. Number one contains a double negative, which, while grammatically wrong, is commonly used. In number two, "them" is used rather than "those," because, once again, this is how many people speak the language, without regard to whether it is grammatically correct. "All in all" is a commonly used locution meaning the entirety of something, or to the greatest extent. The locution "taken all in all" means that when everything is considered, and the songwriter is saying that when everything is considered, the teachers represent another brick in the wall that hems in children, and turns them into neurotic and unhappy adults.
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  3  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 05:23 am
@milimi,
The lyrics are meant to sound uneducated, they are intentionally incorrect from a grammar point of view. "All in all" means "everything considered".
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 06:55 am
@milimi,
Where was you brung up? Roger Waters was brought up near people who say, "Where was you brung up?"
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 07:42 am
@izzythepush,
That's right. Near Levveredd.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 07:45 am
@Lordyaswas,
Wot choo call me?
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 07:48 am
@izzythepush,
You talkin t'me or chooin a brick?
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 07:50 am
@Lordyaswas,
Shitting a brick actually.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 07:54 am
@izzythepush,
That was an actual saying that was all the fashion when I was a teen. Gawd knows what it meant.

One of my favourites though, originates from Dorset/West Country.


"Wharz 'ee to?" (Where is he going?)
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 08:12 am
You can't get there from here.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 08:42 am
@Lordyaswas,
Lordyaswas wrote:

That was an actual saying that was all the fashion when I was a teen. Gawd knows what it meant.


You talkin t'me or chooin a brick? Cos you lose your fookin' teeth either way.
0 Replies
 
 

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