9
   

Spanish Saying

 
 
Naedre
 
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 05:37 am
"Fuiste por lana y saliste trasquilado"

Is there an English equivalent to this Hispanic saying?

Thanks.
 
View best answer, chosen by Naedre
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 05:44 am
@Naedre,
Perhaps it would help if you gave the context in which you would use such a saying.
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 05:48 am
@Naedre,
I can't think of a proverb or adage in English that would convey quite the same image of a wool shearer being clipped himself.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  5  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 06:10 am
Googling and then translating, it comes back as "Go for wool and come back shorn"

I think that's pretty understandable in English right there.

Otherwise, maybe I've been hoisted by my own pitard, shot myself in the foot, screwed the pooch.

chai2
 
  3  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 06:53 am
@chai2,
So why the thumb down?

That's the translation.

At least be brave enough to state what's wrong with my post, instead of following people around and meaninglessly doing this.

Must be an exciting life.
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 07:07 am
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:

So why the thumb down?


Someone doesn't like you Chai, so they thumb you down. Osso and I get the same.

Btw, I've thumbed you back up.

I tend to ignore it, don't give them the satisfaction.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 08:37 am
@Naedre,
Naedre wrote:

"Fuiste por lana y saliste trasquilado"

Is there an English equivalent to this Hispanic saying?

Thanks.


How can there be an English equivalent? Speaking in English affords one a different perspective on reality.
contrex
  Selected Answer
 
  5  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 11:56 am
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:

How can there be an English equivalent? Speaking in English affords one a different perspective on reality.


Not really. Not very different. Proverbs tend to arise from ordinary human situations. The English saying "many go for wool and come back shorn", meaning "many seek to better themselves or make themselves rich, but end by losing what they already have" appears in J Ray's English Proverbs of 1678. It is also found in France and Italy that I know of, and could well have been a Latin saying used by the Romans.


0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 12:14 pm
I bet it is found in every society that has raised sheep.
0 Replies
 
Naedre
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 01:27 pm
@chai2,
That would be the correct translation, but is that an actual English proverb?

In Spanish you have a saying like "al que madruga, Dios le ayuda" which in English would be equivalent to "the early bird gets the worm." That however is not a translation, just a saying in English with essentially the same message.

So I'm just wondering what the equivalent saying would be in English... if there is one.

Naedre
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 01:33 pm
@Foofie,
I don't think language difference can have such a radical shift in perspective :-\

You can find many of the same proverbs (either with the same phrasing or not) in different western languages.
0 Replies
 
timur
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 01:33 pm
@Naedre,
Chai told you already.

The most approaching saying would be: hoist with his own petard.
Naedre
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 01:46 pm
@timur,
Ah I see, that makes sense.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 01:57 pm
@Naedre,
"Were you left for wool and shorn"
Seems contrex provided the best answer.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 01:58 pm
@timur,
timur wrote:

Chai told you already.

The most approaching saying would be: hoist with his own petard.


The exact equivalent, word for word, is an English proverb.
chai2
 
  3  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 06:25 pm
@contrex,
Hoisted by his own Picard.

http://ic.pics.livejournal.com/tangotabby/20979131/66418/66418_900.jpg

BTW izzythepush, I pretty much know what ass hat is doing this, doesn't bother me personally.
It's when you're trying to give a good answer to someone, and it's marked down, the person asking the question would probably think it wasn't a good reply.

Not very helpful to them.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 06:30 pm
@chai2,
I never thought of that. I'll make a point of up marking the good answers. Mostly, I got away from fixing those things on the theory that we should know what infantile jerks we have around here.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 06:31 pm
@roger,
Normally not a problem roger. Except when it's someone new who's just asking a question.

I know what you mean though.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Sun 27 Jul, 2014 02:23 pm
Proverbs in different languages are still different, in my opinion, in the context of how they are used. Meaning in some cultures there are likely many sayings relating to masculine identity. In others very little. So, the emphasis on masculinity in some cultures does not equate to a similar saying in a culture that does not glorify masculine indentity. Thinking in English makes one a different person, in my opinion.
CalamityJane
 
  3  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 02:51 pm
@Foofie,
I am surprised you didn't get anything Jewish into your statement - you're getting lax, Foofie.
 

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