Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 08:44 am
What is the history of Juneteenth?

During the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on 22 September 1862, to be introduced at the beginning of January 1863. It proclaimed the freedom of slaves in the 10 states still in rebellion, freeing around 3 million of the 4 million slaves in captivity at the time.

Texas, even after military hostilities had ended, did not comply with the proclamation.

On 18 June 1865, Union General Gordon Granger, along with 2,000 federal troops, arrived in Galveston, Texas, to take possession of the state and enforce the emancipation of the men and women still in captivity. The announcement of "General Order No 3", read by Grander, was made on 19 June, now known as Juneteenth.

Juneteenth celebration
Juneteenth celebration in Austin, Texas, on 19 June 1900Wiki Commons/Austin Public Library
It read: "The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free."

Celebrations

Juneteenth celebrations began the next year, as freed men and women gathered their funds to buy land specifically for their communities and large gatherings.

However, celebrations ceased in the early 20th century as the Depression forced many former slaves to leave farm work and move into the cities to find employment, where employers were less willing to grant leave to celebrate the date.

Similarly, there was an increase in popularity for African-American citizens to celebrate 4 July as Independence Day. The Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s focused on African-American youth in the struggle for racial equality.

After the Poor People's Campaign of 1968, led by Martin Luther King Jr until his assassination, many attendees began celebrating Juneteenth. From the 1980s, the day began to gather popularity

National holiday

The day was made a state holiday in Texas from 1980, although the move was opposed by African-American representative Clay Smothers, who derided the observance as merely "ceremoniously grinning and bursting watermelons on the Capitol grounds".

The official celebrations has spread to other states and in 1996, the first legislation to recognise "Juneteenth Independence Day" was introduced in the House of Representatives.

National Juneteenth Observance Foundation continues to campaign for the US to recognise the day as a National Holiday Observance.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 7 • Views: 1,677 • Replies: 18

 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 09:18 am
@edgarblythe,
From wiki -

The event was made a Texas state holiday beginning in 1980, under legislation introduced by freshman Democratic state representative Al Edwards. The legislation was opposed by African-American representative Clay Smothers of Dallas County, who declared the holiday "fraudulent" and belittled the observance as merely "ceremoniously grinning and bursting watermelons on the Capitol grounds".[10] Juneteenth is a "partial staffing holiday", meaning that state offices do not close, but some employees use a floating holiday to take the day off. Schools are not affected because they are already into summer vacation by June 19.[citation needed]

Its observance has spread to many other states, with a few celebrations taking place even in other countries.[11][12] As of May 2013, 43 U.S. states and the District of Columbia have recognized Juneteenth as either a state holiday or special day of observance; these are Alabama, Alaska,[12][13] Arkansas,[13] California,[12][13] Colorado,[13] Connecticut,[12][13] Delaware,[13] Florida,[13] Georgia, Idaho,[13] Illinois,[13] Indiana, Iowa,[13] Kansas,[13] Kentucky,[13][14] Louisiana,[13] Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts,[13] Michigan,[13] Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri,[13] Nebraska,[13] Nevada, New Jersey,[12][13] New Mexico,[13] New York,[12][13] North Carolina,[13] Ohio, Oklahoma,[13] Oregon,[13] Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina,[13] Tennessee,[13] Texas,[13] Vermont,[13] Virginia,[13] Washington,[13] West Virginia,[13] Wisconsin,[13] and Wyoming.[13]

In 1996 the first legislation to recognize "Juneteenth Independence Day" was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives, H.J. Res. 195, sponsored by Barbara-Rose Collins (D-MI). In 1997 Congress recognized the day through Senate Joint Resolution 11 and House Joint Resolution 56. In 2013 The U.S. Senate passed Senate Resolution 175, acknowledging Lula Briggs Galloway (late president of the National Association of Juneteenth Lineage) who "successfully worked to bring national recognition to Juneteenth Independence Day", and the continued leadership of the National Juneteenth Observance Foundation.[15]
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 11:16 am
Is there a holiday greeting? Happy Juneteenth? Have a merry Juneteenth? Have a joyous Juneteenth?

I take it that this is a Black holiday, and whites are persona non grata?

JTT
 
  4  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 11:52 am
@Foofie,
Quote:
I take it that this is a Black holiday, and whites are persona non grata?


Would Hitler get an invite to your house for dinner, Foofie?
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 11:54 am
@Foofie,
**** off.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 11:58 am
@edgarblythe,
The Delawar celebrations had alwys been a big "beach day" with ribs and cole slaw nd corn bread. its always nice on Juneteenth in Delaware. Trubble is, nobody can find Delaware
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 12:10 pm
@farmerman,
Delaware is like some mythical place I will never get to see.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 12:16 pm
@edgarblythe,
We always hoist a cool one or two to your being among us in spirit. Some guys do so much hoisting that they wanna come down there and drive you up to Lewes Delaware . (Don't do it, theyr all really hammered by the 21st which is the next big Delaware Dy which is "get naked for the solstice" in which hoisting is clearly involved
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 01:53 pm
https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xaf1/t1.0-9/10491286_10152164560974499_8714458160915317780_n.jpg
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 02:45 pm
@edgarblythe,
I never knew this book existed!
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 02:46 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
You do now. Smile
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 20 Jun, 2014 11:42 am
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

**** off.


You expected me to take your thread's topic in the same spirit as you think you gave it? Considering you really did not give your editorial comments, one could not be sure what the post's meaning was supposed to have? Your reply to me only makes sense if you can mind read my intent.

Perhaps, I was supposed to get on the political correctness bandwagon and give accolades for a holiday that has nothing to do with my citizenship (aka, not a national holiday)? If I do not expect you to be interested in a post about the history of American Jewry, please do not think I should get on your bandwagon. I do not proselytize, so I have the ethical right not to react as someone might think I should. Let's be realists; let's have an even playing field.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 12:19 pm
Today marks the 150th anniversary of Juneteenth, the day in 1865 upon which slaves in Texas learned that they were free. At that time, there were an estimated 250,000 slaves in Texas. As news of the end of the Civil War moved slowly, it did not reach Texas until May 1865, and the Army of the Trans-Mississippi did not surrender until June 2. On June 18, 1865, Union General Gordon Granger arrived at Galveston Island with 2,000 federal troops to occupy Texas on behalf of the federal government. On June 19, standing on the balcony of Galveston's Ashton Villa, Granger read aloud the contents of "General Order No. 3", announcing the total emancipation of slaves:
"The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere"
Texas was the first state to proclaim Juneteenth a holiday. The legislature passed the act in 1979, and Governor Bill Clements, Jr., signed it into law. The first state-sponsored Juneteenth celebration took place in 1980.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 12:51 pm
@edgarblythe,
I knew it was celebrated in Los Angeles, though not if it was official. Don't hear of it here in NM, not a place of great diversity.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 03:17 pm
It was a big deal in Denver, and probably still is. It was a happy day, and strangely uncontaminated with racial feeling.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 03:59 pm
I was just listening to an NPR segment about Juneteenth, and had something of an realization.

Barbeques quickly became popular to celebrate the day, along with drinking strawberry soda. The reason for the latter being that they finally had the money to go out and buy or make it.

Suddenly I thought "****, is that where Big Red comes from?"

I had never heard of Big Red before moving to Texas, and still can make myself drink it. I think I may have taken a sip years ago.

I just did a little googling, and below is one of the links I found.

http://www.saveur.com/article/Travels/The-Red-Soda-Celebration
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 04:29 pm
I missed the connection with red soda. But I myself have been drinking an occasional Big Red most of my life. I thought I had some in California, but I couldn't if it was unavailable there before 1957. I didn't quit drinking soda water until about six years ago, or thereabouts.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 04:36 pm
@chai2,
I think Rick Riordan wrote a book called Tequila Red. He's worth reading. He also wrote The Devil Went Down to Austin, and a bunch of others featuring your region. Matter of fact, he lived and taught middle school English in San Antonio. I think he continued teaching till he went to Hollywood on a book to movie deal.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 06:00 pm
@roger,
roger, I haven't read either one of them, so I can't give an opinion. However, I can say that I have read only one book where the story was located in Austin, where the author "got it right".

Again, don't know about Riordan, but everyone wants the story or background to revolve around 6th Street (which is nothing but a nasty ass strip of bars, drunk college students and puke as far as I'm concerned) or the music scene. It's as if they think every single person is somehow involved in a band.

Now as far as who got it right....it's this book....

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51t5m0w9EZL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

If you live here, it's obvious he does too. I was laughing at one scene in the book where the protagonist was going home from work, and the author was describing the route. I was visualizing it and thought "hey, that's over on Mary Street, a couple blocks from the library". My house is about, oh, 5 blocks in the other direction. When I returned the book to that branch, I mentioned it and the librarian said "Oh, Owen? He's in here all the time. Lives right around the corner. Great guy." He wrote about actual places people go to that weren't bars or some music festival.

Don't know what his opinion on Juneteenth is.

0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, EVERYONE! - Discussion by OmSigDAVID
WIND AND WATER - Discussion by Setanta
Who ordered the construction of the Berlin Wall? - Discussion by Walter Hinteler
True version of Vlad Dracula, 15'th century - Discussion by gungasnake
ONE SMALL STEP . . . - Discussion by Setanta
History of Gun Control - Discussion by gungasnake
Where did our notion of a 'scholar' come from? - Discussion by TuringEquivalent
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Juneteenth
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 07/03/2020 at 08:04:20