1
   

we are only as good as our last meeting?

 
 
Nancy88
 
Reply Mon 5 May, 2014 08:07 pm
we are only as good as our last meeting
What's the meaning of this saying?
many thanks!
 
View best answer, chosen by Nancy88
oristarA
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 5 May, 2014 11:01 pm
@Nancy88,
It refers to:
Our last meeting gave us a good time.
And now, we have a good time as well.


@ Contrex, McTag et.al, I stand corrected if my answer fails to catch the essence of the question.
0 Replies
 
McTag
  Selected Answer
 
  3  
Reply Tue 6 May, 2014 02:42 am
@Nancy88,

Quote:
we are only as good as our last meeting
What's the meaning of this saying?


It's not a "saying" that I've ever seen before, but it's similar to others.

Oristar is right, it means we should continue as we were, and we cannot depend on good fortune or to "rest on our laurels", which means to congratulate ourselves on how good we are, and stop putting the required amount of effort in.
You often see it in a sporting context: the team is "only as good as its last match"- reputation counts for nothing, a team has to put the same amount of effort in every week in order to succeed.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 May, 2014 02:57 am
Oristar's interpretation is bullshit. It has nothing to do with "giving us a good time." It means that "we" (whoever that is) have no continuity in our performance. If we were effective at out last meeting, we retain that effectiveness. But if we were more effective at our task in the meeting before the last meeting, we have lost that effectiveness by the time of our last meeting, and have not recovered it since then. With no more context than this, it's difficult to see what the nuances are. If the context is political, it probably refers to the axiomatic assumption that the pubic has a short memory--but it doubt that this applies here. In business, it would imply a lack of consistent performance, a failure to incorporate beneficial changes in performance over time.

Meeting one--we have been doing well.

Meeting two--we have improved our performance.

Meeting three--we are doing well, but not up to the standard we reached between meetings one and two. Our performance is not as good as it once was--because we are only as good as our last meeting[/o].
McTag
 
  2  
Reply Tue 6 May, 2014 04:47 am
@Setanta,

Quote:
Oristar's interpretation is bullshit.


I think that is a little unfair, if I might say so. He was on the right track, even though a "meeting" is not usually about "having a good time". Not the kind of meetings I have anyway. Smile
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 May, 2014 05:11 am
Don't go all holy Joe on me here, McT, i've seen you complain about Oristar's penchant for playing the expert in English, and just recently, too. Oristar really has no business answering EFL questions.
McTag
 
  2  
Reply Tue 6 May, 2014 06:21 am
@Setanta,

Pardon. I don't want to discourage our chum, nor blame him for trying.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 May, 2014 07:01 am
http://able2know.org/topic/244001-1
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  0  
Reply Tue 6 May, 2014 08:17 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Oristar's interpretation is bullshit. It has nothing to do with "giving us a good time." It means that "we" (whoever that is) have no continuity in our performance. If we were effective at out last meeting, we retain that effectiveness. But if we were more effective at our task in the meeting before the last meeting, we have lost that effectiveness by the time of our last meeting, and have not recovered it since then. With no more context than this, it's difficult to see what the nuances are. If the context is political, it probably refers to the axiomatic assumption that the pubic has a short memory--but it doubt that this applies here. In business, it would imply a lack of consistent performance, a failure to incorporate beneficial changes in performance over time.

Meeting one--we have been doing well.

Meeting two--we have improved our performance.

Meeting three--we are doing well, but not up to the standard we reached between meetings one and two. Our performance is not as good as it once was--because we are only as good as our last meeting[/o].


Failed to understand "but it doubt that this applies here".
"it doubt" looks ungrammatical to me.
But how to correct it, McTag?

oristarA
 
  0  
Reply Tue 6 May, 2014 08:18 am
@Nancy88,
Give McTag the ribbon.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Tue 6 May, 2014 09:43 am
@oristarA,
It's called a typographical error, you snide little creep. It is corrected by writing "i doubt."
oristarA
 
  0  
Reply Tue 6 May, 2014 09:59 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

It's called a typographical error, you snide little creep. It is corrected by writing "i doubt."


Who is actually snide, Set?
The one who called himself "it" has more to do snideness. Razz
Joking. Better soften your fiery temper.
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Tue 6 May, 2014 10:18 am
@oristarA,
It's not a temper, it's contempt. You have no business answer EFL questions, and you have posted for years now as though you know English as well as or better than native speakers of English. Better reduce your grossly inflated ego.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 May, 2014 10:43 am
@Setanta,
A review of my post seems necessary for you:

See what I've attached to my answer?
Quote:
@ Contrex, McTag et.al, I stand corrected if my answer fails to catch the essence of the question.


Be aware that English is your native language. So don't make mistakes when you want to show your linguistic superiority. However, your poor logic is contemptible.
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Tue 6 May, 2014 12:27 pm
@oristarA,
My logic stacks up quite well in comparison to yours. Don't tell me about making mistakes. Your first mistake here was to attempt to answer an EFL question. Your constant mistake is in believing that you have a good command of the English language.
oristarA
 
  0  
Reply Tue 6 May, 2014 06:31 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

My logic stacks up quite well in comparison to yours. Don't tell me about making mistakes. Your first mistake here was to attempt to answer an EFL question. Your constant mistake is in believing that you have a good command of the English language.


This proves what I've said: Your p0or logic has led you astray.
If I had that believing, what have I called McTag and Contrex to come here for?
You don't understand it is just a way of learning English. A bridge is required when English speaking people want to be known to non-English people. I have been trying to build the bridge and your manner of seclusion is unwise.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 May, 2014 01:28 am

There's no need to bicker, chaps, so please cut each other some slack.

We all have our faults, yes me too, but I think Oristar's English is better than Setana's Mandarin.
(I know that's not the point here)

Y'all have a nice day. I'm taking my wife's parents to the newly-rebuilt and refurbished Manchester Central Library today.
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Wed 7 May, 2014 02:53 am
I don't, of course, pretend to know anything about Mandarin.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 May, 2014 10:40 pm
@McTag,
McTag wrote:


There's no need to bicker, chaps, so please cut each other some slack.

We all have our faults, yes me too, but I think Oristar's English is better than Setana's Mandarin.(I know that's not the point here)

Y'all have a nice day. I'm taking my wife's parents to the newly-rebuilt and refurbished Manchester Central Library today.


Why not take some photos of the library and share with us? Nice day to you.
But no need to gloss over Setanta's mistke. He's an absolute Mandarin analphabetic.
Setanta's smear (his attack with "a snide little creep") simply exposes his ignorance and laughable arrogance.
Look to something beyond your imagination, Setanta. I appreciate Mrs. Michelle Obama's sincere and humble attitude in learning Mandarin (see the picture attached). Because she's making efforts to build the bridge. And you, Setanta, seem obliged to join the exertion if you appreciate cultural exchanges between nations, especially US and China.
And remember: Never too old to learn.
http://www.ccnews.gov.cn/tx/gj/201403/W020140327345567517994.jpg
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 May, 2014 06:13 am
@oristarA,
Is there ever any westerner in history who has mastered perfect Mandarin (could write, read, hear)? The answer seems NO.
If you don't believe this conclusion, please find me one.
Chinese lauaguage is harder than English.
0 Replies
 
 

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