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When was the last time you went into a church?

 
 
chai2
 
Reply Sun 20 Apr, 2014 06:59 pm
Or a mosque, synagogue, etc.

On the "Love it or Leave it" thread yesterday, the post was "going to Easter services" and I said "Leave it"

Got me thinking the last time I was in a church was between 5 and 10 years ago, because I was visiting someone, and they were going to Mass. I just tagged along.

Prior to that was probably about 15 years ago from the present. I have no idea why I got the sudden idea to go to a service, but I went to some I think Methodist church near my house. I ended up being really annoyed. When I service was over I was trying to sit quietly while this crowd was leaving, figuring I'd wait until it thinned out. While sitting there I had 2 separate people come up, getting way overly friendly and intrusive.

Time before that, except for a few weddings, was probably around 1985. My pentacostal roommate dragged me there. There was speaking of tongues, some woman who got the urge to do an interpretive dance of the virgin Mary in the aisle, and another womans water broke, but she wouldn't get up and leave until her husband, who was one of guitar players, swaddled her in his jacket. That was quite a day.

How about you?

Was it today, yesterday, weeks, years, never?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 17 • Views: 2,312 • Replies: 34
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Apr, 2014 07:07 pm
About 17 years ago, for a wedding.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Apr, 2014 07:10 pm
@chai2,
Does going as a tourist just to see incredible architecture in a Cathedral count? I did that in September. The last time attending a service was a memorial service for a family member a couple of years ago.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Apr, 2014 07:20 pm
BTW everyone, this thread isn't meant to be judgemental or opinionated in any way. It's not geared toward any particular religion or belief system.

I just got to wondering when, and if you'd like to share, the circumstances.

Regular attendees, I'd love to hear from you too.

My grandmother went to church almost every day of her life. As well as her being devout, it was a way for all the little old ladies to keep up on each other. If you weren't seen at 7am Mass, expect the posse to arrive at your door by 8:15am to see if you're alive.
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 20 Apr, 2014 08:00 pm
I last went to church 12 years ago, if you want to call Leicester Prison chapel a "church".
There were always plenty of other cons in there, I think the main reason they went was to ogle the young woman chaplain and get a sip of communion wine off her..Wink
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Apr, 2014 03:25 pm
bump
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2014 11:32 am
Easter, together with what appeared to be half the population of Stoneham.
Rhys and I wound up sitting in the old choir loft. Things should be back to
normal next Sunday.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2014 11:35 am
I last went into a church to participate in the religious activities about 50 years ago, and even then, i was just keeping my part of a bargain which assured i'd never have to do that again. As for simply going into such a building, i've done that time and again over the years for non-religious activities. There are several churches here in town that are used for concert venues.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2014 11:47 am
@George,
George wrote:


Things should be back to
normal next Sunday.


How full is the church normally?
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2014 12:14 pm
@chai2,
Mosque? Never have

Church? For a service proper it's been lord knows how many years. Somewhere around 1982 when I was attending some Catholic church services. Been inside a few other times but not for services. Closest was in 1996 when I kept a promise to light a candle and say a prayer for a man who died the November prior.

Left the Methodist Church at around the same time and haven't been back inside.
(by the way chai, those Methodists are known for their friendly nature. It's the main reason my mother used for joining them as opposed to other Protestant denominations when she decided to branch off from Judaism)

Synagogue/Temple? Somewhere around 2002 or 2003 maybe it was.
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2014 01:52 pm
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:
. . . How full is the church normally?
Pretty full. Stoneham has a large Irish and Italian population and St. Pat's is
the only RC church. We go to the 10:00 "family" mass. That's the service
no one expects peace and quiet at. It's mostly young families with kids.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2014 01:56 pm
3 years ago, Christmas midnight mass.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2014 02:03 pm
@chai2,
Nearly exactly one year ago, at my aunt's requiem. And before that for mother's requiem - that's exactly four years ago.

Otherwise, I go quite often in churches ... out of history, art and art history interests. (And for photographing.)
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2014 02:19 pm
I like to go just simply because I like and enjoy a church service now and then as long as it is not a form of reformed church.
I also visit churches of historical interest, but find it more interesting to take part in a churchservice as that gives much more the feeling of what the building was supposed to be used for than just walking in and look at it.
I also experience an operahouse differently when I hear an opera than if I just get in and look at it.
0 Replies
 
blueveinedthrobber
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2014 03:08 pm
Is 'Going to Church' Compatible with the Teachings of Jesus of Nazareth?

For those who might be new in trying to follow Jesus of Nazareth (or those even trying to understand what it means to follow Jesus), the answer to this question might be unclear. If you have been exposed to christianity, which claims to represent Jesus of Nazareth, you have been taught that the essence of being a christian involves being a member of ‘the church’, attending its 'services' and actively serving God through that organization. But is this what Jesus of Nazareth actually teaches?

Let’s start with the basics. The English word translated “church” in the new testament is based on the Greek word transliterated “ekklesia”. If one looks up that word in a Greek dictionary, one will find a definition that says something to the effect of “the called out ones”, plural. Some say the word carries with it an actual gathering or meeting of people, but this author’s opinion is that the plurality of “the called out ones” is sufficient. What is absolutely certain is that the word itself does not mean a building, an organization, a leadership structure, religious or social programs, or a place to worship God. What is equally certain, by knowing Jesus' other teachings, is that the “out” that is referred to in ekklesia’s definition of “the called out ones” is the world.

"If you were of the world, the world would love its own; but because you are not of the world, but I chose you out of the world, because of this the world hates you.” John 15:19

"I have given them Your word; and the world has hated them, because they are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.” John 17:14

"For God did not send the Son into the world to judge the world, but that the world might be saved through him. He who believes in him is not judged; he who does not believe has been judged already, because he has not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God. This is the judgment, that the Light has come into the world, and men loved the darkness rather than the Light, for their deeds were evil.” (John 3:17-19)

And so the term "church" is defined by the Jesus of Nazareth as his collective followers who are called out of the world. And yet christians almost universally refer to “the church” as the building on the corner where they go each Sunday to hear a clergyman give a speech, partake in rituals regarding 'the last supper', and sing songs about God. Even at this basic level, there is error. There is no commonality between what the word’s actual definition is (and the context in which Jesus uses it as we will see shortly), and what christian’s say it means. Many christian leaders of sects that say they are careful to follow the bible will say, “oh, no, we know that the building is only the place where the church meets”. But even in these organizations, if you listen to the words of the people as they speak about “the church” during the week, you will find that the normal usage of the term “church” means the building, the clergy, the Sunday meeting, and the programs.

Sadly, they don’t see themselves called out of anything (except perhaps gross moral sin), but rather called into a building for the weekly “service” and a few good works that fit into their schedule. In fact, that building, leadership and organization is very much a part of the world, accepted by the world as a good thing in general. It is merely another religio-social organization no different than any other religion or good works social club. The government in the US even grants them a special tax status so that they don't have to give to Caesar what is Caesars'! How is it that a visible organization which is supposedly representing the kingdom of God is accepted and blessed by the world's governments? How does that fit in with all of Jesus' teachings that his called out ones will be hated, rejected and persecuted by the world?
saab
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2014 03:19 pm
I have taken part in a very orthodox service in a synagog.
Went with a Jewish friend andfound it very interesting
0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2014 03:29 pm
Been to several funerals lately...so churches and synagogues have been plentiful.

And almost every times I go into NYC...I visit St. Patrick's Cathedral. Gorgeous place...and interesting.
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2014 04:44 pm
I'm universalist Unitarian so I go quite often to services.

I enjoy hearing moral teachings from around the world, ancient and contemporary.

0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2014 08:17 pm
@blueveinedthrobber,
Quote:
Is 'Going to Church' Compatible with the Teachings of Jesus of Nazareth?
Alan Watts used to say that "church" is not a building, it is what goes on inside of the buildings commonly called the church.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Apr, 2014 05:29 pm
@chai2,
I'm not sure.

Probably two years ago at a wedding.

I don't "go to church," but I usually like it when I do.

I don't buy much of what is being sold, but I like rituals and particularly ones based on religion.

The husband of a friend of mine was a member of the Staten Island Emergency Rescue Squad on 9/11. Sadly, he was among the brave who perished that day. I traveled to NYC to attend his funeral mass and found the experience extremely moving; in a way that I don't think would have been possible outside the context of church.

Whether or not they may be considered hypocrites based on their daily lives, most of the people who go to church do so in good faith and for that hour or so try and tap into what is good about people and the world.

I prefer traditional Protestant services to all others as they tend to involve the singing of multiple traditions hymns. Nothing like a big pipe organ pounding out " A Might Fortress is Our God" and hundreds of soulful voices singing along.

I've only been to a couple of "black" church services but I loved them. The singing and the passion were inspirational.

I really can't abide "modern" services.

Church gets a bad rap from the liberal sophisticatos, because of their bigotry.

They imagine that pastors and priests spend every Sunday telling the congregation that homosexuals are abominations and women who have abortions are going straight to the pits of Hell.

People are, overwhelmingly, at their best when they are at church.

Far be it from me to suggest that anyone must or should go to church every week, but the reasons why a great deal of people refuse to attend are based on silly prejudicial notions.

 

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