4
   

"at the crease"

 
 
Reply Tue 15 Apr, 2014 10:18 pm
What does "at the crease" mean? Thanks a lot!
 
anonymously99
 
  0  
Reply Tue 15 Apr, 2014 10:30 pm
@avalipeng,
On the edge?

Cutting it short?

I've about had enough of you?

Just about done for?

I've almost had it ((had enough))?

0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 12:18 am
@avalipeng,
If referring to hockey, it's at the edge of the goal mouth.
0 Replies
 
anonymously99
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 12:35 am
@avalipeng,
I'm thinking maybe crease in paper from having folded it. I ruined my written paper after I folded it in half because I left a crease in it. Folded it because I was in a hurry to get out of class. The paper wasn't due till the next day. I usually don't think when I'm in a hurry.

Crease in the wall? Corner.

Crease in the road? Curb.

Crease in the first page of a bible because I folded it by accident from being in a hurry or being careless.

Or crease in the corner of the page from folding it to mark the place in a book.
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  3  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 12:36 am
@avalipeng,
In cricket, it means the position at which the batsman receives the ball and defends the wicket. He is "on the spot". or "on duty", or "the key player of the moment". He is "making the running".
anonymously99
 
  -3  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 12:38 am
@fresco,
What's wrong with being in the spotlight when you know you're not a bad person.
fresco
 
  2  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 12:45 am
@anonymously99,
Shocked
Who said anything about "being wrong" ?
anonymously99
 
  -3  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 12:52 am
@fresco,
I'm waiting for someone to understand.
fresco
 
  2  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 12:53 am
@anonymously99,
Don't hold your breath ! Smile
anonymously99
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 01:02 am
@fresco,
I have told myself in other words.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  3  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 01:07 am
@avalipeng,
It comes from the game of cricket.
Two batsmen are on the field at the one time. The one "at the crease" is waiting to receive the next delivery from the bowler.
So he is the one in action at that point in the play. As an analogy, it can be used to describe someone in action, on the spot, "on the job" (no jokes necessary here), someone of responsibility.

In other words, what Fresno said.
anonymously99
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 02:16 am
@McTag,
Where?
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 03:47 am
@anonymously99,

Where what?
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 06:28 am
@avalipeng,
What is the context?

I know it only as a hockey term.
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 08:35 am
@ehBeth,

Ice hockey? What does it mean in that game?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 08:37 am
@McTag,
It means the space immediately in front of the goal, in front of the net.
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 08:45 am
@Setanta,
Okay, thanks.

In cricket, the bowling crease and the batting crease are crucial to the umpire's decisions in the game. They are lines drawn precisely on the wicket. The batsman receiving the bowler's delivery stands between them, usually just behind the batting crease or straddling it. He is ready, and said to be "at the crease". The focus of the attack, for the moment, is on him.

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-r7CXHs1XaJk/T6znCalEoII/AAAAAAAABZg/qgT5XWfHXw0/s1600/cricket.jpg

Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 08:51 am
@McTag,
I had not responded before for precisely that reason. In hockey, one says "in the crease," not "at the crease." Therefore, as far as i can see, responses referring to cricket are correct--references to hockey are not. The crease in hockey is precisely defined, too, and the referees make decisions based on whether or not the opposing team is in the crease, and in some very restricted cases, on whether or not the goalie is in the crease. Obviously, "at the crease"does not refer to hockey.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 08:52 am
http://thumb7.shutterstock.com/display_pic_with_logo/78164/78164,1299990362,1/stock-photo-a-hockey-or-ringette-net-and-crease-in-the-rink-73022572.jpg
0 Replies
 
avalipeng
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Apr, 2014 01:49 am
Thank you all, guys. here is the sentence"he is still at the crease, despite many appeals from his critics to sundry umpires" . I was at a total loss when I came across this sentence. “sundry umpires”, what is that?
 

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