7
   

are classes/course in/on fine art carried out the same way as other courses

 
 
WBYeats
 
Reply Thu 10 Apr, 2014 11:03 pm
For engineering, students might have lab sessions; for medicine, they might have placement; for business, they might have group projects discussing advertisement design in class; etc.

Is this natural:

-Are classes/course in/on fine art carried out the same way as other courses? Other courses have lecture and tutorial [...]
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2014 12:25 am
@WBYeats,
Well, you won't have lab experiences, but there should be guest lecturers, exposure to museums, it all depends on what direction you choose in fine arts. It's not shop or cosmetology.
McTag
 
  3  
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2014 02:47 am
@WBYeats,

1. in

2. carried out in...
run in.....
offered in.....
given in....


...carried out in the same way as on other courses.
WBYeats
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2014 04:30 am
@McTag,
THank you~

Is
-carried out in the same way as on...

the ellipted form of

-...the same way as classes are run etc, on other courses

?
McTag
 
  2  
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2014 05:54 am
@WBYeats,

Yes. (although I'm not sure what "ellipted" means)

examples:

I behaved the same way this week as on previous weeks.

As on previous occasions, I went to the bar for a drink before the concert.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2014 08:19 am
@glitterbag,
The "question" was an example to ask about the appropriate preposition, gb.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2014 08:26 am
@McTag,
Quote:



1. IN

2. carried out IN...
run IN.....
offered IN....
given IN.....


...carried out in the same way as ON other courses.


We seem to have a disconnect here, or a typo.
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2014 08:52 am
@WBYeats,
WBYeats wrote:

For engineering, students might have lab sessions; for medicine, they might have placement; for business, they might have group projects discussing advertisement design in class; etc.

Is this natural:

-Are classes/course in/on fine art carried out the same way as other courses? Other courses have lecture and tutorial [...]


Oh I'm sorry WBYeats, I didn't realize this was a question about English usage, I thought you were asking about the difference between course work for engineers verses liberal art students.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2014 08:57 am
@glitterbag,
You're welcome, gb.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  0  
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2014 09:39 am
@JTT,

Quote:
We seem to have a disconnect here, or a typo.


Not so. Read it again, in its entirety.

And don't presume to correct my work. You haven't got the nous.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2014 10:41 am
@McTag,
Quote:
carried out in the same way as ON other courses.


Are you sure, McTag, 'on'?

Quote:
And don't presume to correct my work.


Then stop screwing up so regularly.

Quote:
You haven't got the nous.


Hung with his own petard.

/////////////////
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/nous

Nous

...

2 • informal , chiefly British Common sense; practical intelligence:
if he had any nous at all, he’d sell the movie rights


/////////////////////
nous
Definitions
noun

...
2. (British, slang) common sense; intelligence
http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/nous
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 07:49 am
@JTT,

Quote:
Are you sure, McTag, 'on'?


yes

Quote:
Then stop screwing up so regularly.


I didn't make a mistake, but you did.

Quote:
Hung with his own petard.


False, and a misquote.

How is the view from the top of the dungheap, JTT? Pillock.

JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 07:53 am
@McTag,
Why the terrible reluctance to expand, McTag? You know how dangerous it is for you to open your mouth - your foot immediately shoots up to fill the hole.
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 07:55 am
@JTT,
Insults will only take you so far...that is, not very.

Your professors would be ashamed of what they have produced.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 07:58 am
@McTag,
You insult yourself, laddie, with your inability to focus on the language issues.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 07:58 am
@McTag,
McTag wrote:

Quote:
Hung with his own petard.


False, and a misquote.


Yes, it's "hoist" (blown up) by his own petard (a crude form of explosive device)
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 08:02 am
@McTag,
McTag wrote:

I behaved the same way this week as on previous weeks.

As on previous occasions, I went to the bar for a drink before the concert.


those are interesting - can't imagine anyone speaking like that but I guess anything is possible in spoken language
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 09:03 am
@contrex,

[/quote]

Yes, it's "hoist" (blown up) by his own petard (a crude form of explosive device)

[/quote]

Without a doubt that is the nicest and most accurate explanation of that line. Also if you use the word 'hung' it's accurate in this form "the stockings were hung on the chimney with care", in other words items or objects are hung or you hang the items on the chimney. If the misquote used hanged, it would at least be normal usage however the actual quote used "hoist".

Modern English usage, especially spoken English can be very informal combining slang and bending nouns into verbs. Depending on the circumstances, it's important to know when informal/trendy/slang usage is acceptable, at gatherings of friends or family. And when it's not, such as applying for a position as an English professor, or during a job interview (unless of course you are trying out for the banjo spot with a Country Music Band. By the way, Kris Kristopherson was a Rhodes Scholar, and Im pretty sure he knows the difference. It's not a matter of right or wrong or good and bad, and especially not stupid versus refined. It depends on the situation you are in at the time.

0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 09:14 am
@contrex,
Quote:
McTag wrote: I behaved the same way this week as on previous weeks


Is 'on', as used in the above example, idiomatic/natural BrE, Contrex?
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 08:56 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
it's "hoist" (blown up)


'hoist' doesn't mean 'blown up', C.
 

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