6
   

Bring it Beeyotch?

 
 
Reply Tue 1 Apr, 2014 06:41 pm
Plus, What does "cheat" mean in "cheat meal"?

Context:

http://gtafitness.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/The-Rock-Cheat-Meal.jpg

http://gtafitness.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/The-Rock-Cheat-Meal.jpg
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 6 • Views: 1,561 • Replies: 12

 
View best answer, chosen by oristarA
JTT
  Selected Answer
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Apr, 2014 07:25 pm
@oristarA,
Beeyotch - small outside chance - bitch

cheat meal - take out pizza and take out donuts = lazy get out of work way to do a meal.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Apr, 2014 07:59 pm
@JTT,
Quote:

Beeyotch - small outside chance - bitch


Let me change that to a super tiny outside chance.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Apr, 2014 08:39 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Beeyotch - small outside chance - bitch

cheat meal - take out pizza and take out donuts = lazy get out of work way to do a meal.


Thanks.
I wonder the definition of the word cheat here. Literarily, I see nothing is cheat here. Laziness is not a fraud.
JTT
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Apr, 2014 09:18 pm
@oristarA,
You are taking it too seriously, Ori. It's cheating on what is a normal homemade meal.
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 Apr, 2014 01:06 am
there's not a "small outside chance" that "beeyotch" is "bitch". It is "bitch". I'd say "cheat meal", which is not a phrase that's generally known or used--I've never heard it, also refers to the fact that that meal is not particularly healthy or well-rounded, and is on the other hand, really fattening and fairly bad for (tho it is tasty, which is unfortunately the way things are all too often apt to go). Too much salt, too much sugar, too much fat, too much cholesterol. But it's quick, walk in and three minutes later walk out with it all set to go. JTT is right on that score, it's cheating on a healthy meal that's good for you but takes time and forethought to prepare (and actually these days it's more normal than JTT's "normal homecooked meal" is, since no one has the time to prepare one anymore.
MontereyJack
 
  3  
Reply Wed 2 Apr, 2014 01:14 am
I find the "bring it, beeyotch" i.e. "bring it, bitch" a little harder to put in context. "Bring it" usually is meant as kind of a dare, "Here I am, do your worst, I'm ready for you and you're a pussy and gonna fail". And "bitch" in that context is usually meant as an insult, to either a man or a woman. And I'm not sure how a pizza counts as a dare.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Apr, 2014 01:44 am
@MontereyJack,
MontereyJack wrote:

I find the "bring it, beeyotch" i.e. "bring it, bitch" a little harder to put in context. "Bring it" usually is meant as kind of a dare, "Here I am, do your worst, I'm ready for you and you're a pussy and gonna fail". And "bitch" in that context is usually meant as an insult, to either a man or a woman. And I'm not sure how a pizza counts as a dare.


Should it be "bring away"? It is for sale anyways.
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Apr, 2014 01:47 am

You learn a lot on this forum. (some of it worthwhile Smile )
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Wed 2 Apr, 2014 04:04 am
@MontereyJack,
MontereyJack wrote:
there's not a "small outside chance" that "beeyotch" is "bitch". It is "bitch".

I concur.

Not merely a small outside chance. That is definitely what it is.


MontereyJack wrote:
"Bring it" usually is meant as kind of a dare, "Here I am, do your worst, I'm ready for you and you're a pussy and gonna fail".

I concur here as well.

It is usually said in response to a threat, and is an invitation to the opposing party to go ahead and do whatever they just threatened, with the implication that you are more than ready to handle whatever it is that they are threatening.


George W Bush's somewhat controversial speech shortly after the 2003 invasion of Iraq:
Quote:
There are some who feel like that if they attack us that we may decide to leave prematurely. They don't understand what they're talking about, if that's the case.

Let me finish.

There are some who feel like that, you know, the conditions are such that they can attack us there. My answer is bring them on. We got the force necessary to deal with the security situation.
http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/washington/2003-07-02-bush-speech-text_x.htm
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Apr, 2014 04:47 am
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:
Should it be "bring away"? It is for sale anyways.

I don't think so. I'm not quite sure what "bring away" would mean.

I would guess that someone was just trying to be boisterous about what they felt was an outstanding offering of junk food, and used a boisterous statement that doesn't really fit the situation.

I also note the use of "epic". That is modern slang for "really good" or "awesome". (It's one of the things that World of Warcraft has contributed to wider society.)
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Apr, 2014 09:02 am
OK, I think I have a scenario here. It's in take-out boxes, so it looks like it's not for sale, but has already been bought and brought somewhere else. The background doesn't look like a store, more like someone's kitchen, or an office break room. There are three pizzas, and two dozen donuts, obviously more than one person is gonna eat. So it's something like someone is providing lunch for an office, and the "bring it, beeyotch", which is clearly meant jocularly in this case, is like an invitation to eat, to do your worst in gobbling it.
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Apr, 2014 09:04 am
oralloy's right.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Bring it Beeyotch?
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.07 seconds on 09/25/2021 at 12:18:17