6
   

Would you marry me? Yes I do?

 
 
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 11:41 am
Look at the picture. The English signs on their T-shirts are obviously ungrammatical.
http://i57.tinypic.com/155s1p0.jpg
Should they be:
Will you marry me?
Yes I will.
?
 
View best answer, chosen by oristarA
Region Philbis
 
  3  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 11:44 am
@oristarA,

the "I do" is the reply given when the bride or groom is asked by the person officiating the wedding ceremony:

"Do you take this person to be your lawfully wedded spouse, (etc.)?"
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
  Selected Answer
 
  4  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 11:47 am
@oristarA,
In the United States, Canada, and many other English speaking countries, for some strange reason the priest or person overseeing the marriage ceremony would ask the bride and groom separately the following series of questions:
Do you ______ (bride's name), take this man who now holds your hand, to be your true and wedded husband; etc...?

Do you ______(husband's name), take this woman who now holds your hand, to be your true and wedded wife; etc;...?

For some reason, the person being asked these questions by the minister/priest/etc... answers "I do" if they choose to answer in the affirmative and agree to said marriage.

So in theory, that t-shirt is written appropriately if not grammatically correct fashion.

As for the male's shirt? It should read, "Will you marry me?"
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 12:46 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

In the United States, Canada, and many other English speaking countries, for some strange reason the priest or person overseeing the marriage ceremony would ask the bride and groom separately the following series of questions:
Do you ______ (bride's name), take this man who now holds your hand, to be your true and wedded husband; etc...?


In the United Kingdom, ceremonies don't have to follow that "Do you... I do" question-and-answer format. There are two things which must be included: the declaratory words and the contracting words, and these are available in various forms. Apart from that the couple are free to choose their own words and procedure. Generally this has to be achievable in a 40 minute time frame.

Ceremony A

Declaratory Words

I do solemnly declare that I know not of any lawful impediment why I ………….. may not be joined in matrimony to …………..

Contracting Words

I call upon these persons here present to witness that I ………….. do take thee ………….. to be my lawfully wedded wife/husband.

Ceremony B

Declaratory Words

I declare that I know of no legal reason why I ………….. may not be joined in marriage to …………..

Contracting Words

I ………….. take thee ………….. to be my wedded wife/husband.

Ceremony C

Declaratory Words

The Officiating Registrar will ask 'Are you ………….. free lawfully to marry …………..?' to which you must reply, 'I am'.

Contracting Words

I ………….. take you ………….. to be my wedded wife/husband.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 10:25 pm
@tsarstepan,
Tsars: As for the male's shirt? It should read, "Will you marry me?"
---------

Whenever anyone uses 'should' in describing how language is used, check to see that you still have your wallet.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 10:27 pm
@tsarstepan,
Tsars: So in theory, that t-shirt is written appropriately if not grammatically correct fashion.
-------------

This one isn't - either.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 10:30 pm
@oristarA,
Ori: Should they be:
Will you marry me?
Yes, I will
---________

They could be that, above, Ori, or just as the T shirts read. Why do you think 'would' must be excluded?
anonymously99
 
  2  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 10:33 pm
@tsarstepan,
I don't understand why it matters.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 02:52 am
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Ori: Should they be:
Will you marry me?
Yes, I will
---________

They could be that, above, Ori, or just as the T shirts read. Why do you think 'would' must be excluded?


Would sounds not so certain like will, I think.
anonymously99
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 04:01 am
@oristarA,
Let me try this..
She said would you marry me would you marry me when in the future yes I would marry you in the future but I guess it all depends. Depends on what well someone else I feel so deeply for could ask me between now and then which would mean yeah I would had married you but someone else asked me before our marriage took place question is she can't be in love with two different men so who is she in love with well say the other man who asks her to marry him first she feels so deeply for him doesn't want to say no so she doesn't but says something else. Similar to. You will always be important to me.

She says will you marry me as in as soon as possible be mine well depends on if she's in love and/or at least feeling in love. She still couldn't give a direct yes or no.

The above is based on the opposite of being in person.

She says will you marry me this being in person she says yes if in love. If not in love but feeling so deeply for she would have to walk away.

I don't know. Just some ideas.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 04:12 am
One use for 'would' is used in conditional questions - Would you marry me (if I asked you, if I divorced my present wife, if I moved to your city)? Sometimes the 'if' part can be omitted. 'Will you marry me?' is a direct question and is a very common way in which a proposal of marriage is made. Sometimes 'would' is used in polite direct questions: would you pass the biscuits? Would you open the door for me?

anonymously99
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 04:19 am
@contrex,
Did you just see that thing fly over your head? Shocked
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 04:33 am
@anonymously99,
anonymously99 wrote:

Did you just see that thing fly over your head? Shocked


No.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 06:32 am
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:

JTT wrote:

Ori: Should they be:
Will you marry me?
Yes, I will
---________

They could be that, above, Ori, or just as the T shirts read. Why do you think 'would' must be excluded?


Would sounds not so certain like will, I think.
Yes; it is speculative and conditional guesswork.
It is also mis-spelled: it shud be: wud,
as in: "yea, I wud, if the dowery were big enuf."





David
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 07:31 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:

It is also mis-spelled: it shud be: wud,


That is, of course, bollocks, or "bolox" as he would probably have it. For new members, or those who have not encountered him before, OmSigDAVID is one of A2K's resident loony trolls. He has a crazy mission to reform English spelling. His appearance is one more sign that this thread, as so many do, is now entering a useless phase of trollery.

0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 07:37 am
@contrex,
Contrex: thanks for the correction. I flew blind in that part of the question (by assumption). The UK way is really legalistic and not particularly romantic with its legalese wording. Razz
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 10:53 am
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

Contrex: thanks for the correction. I flew blind in that part of the question (by assumption). The UK way is really legalistic and not particularly romantic with its legalese wording. Razz

The declaratory words and the contracting words are compulsory, and there are fairly informal versions of these, but the ideas is that couples are free to weave their own ceremony script around these, which I think gives them the opportunity be as romantic as they wish.
anonymously99
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 11:01 am
@contrex,
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 09:19 pm
@contrex,
C: One use for 'would' is used in conditional questions - Would you marry me (if I asked you, if I divorced my present wife, if I moved to your city)? Sometimes the 'if' part can be omitted. 'Will you marry me?' is a direct question and is a very common way in which a proposal of marriage is made.

--------

That conditional sense applies equally to 'will', C.

One use for 'will' is used in conditional questions - Will you marry me (if I asked you, if I divorced my present wife, if I moved to your city)?

0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 09:22 pm
@oristarA,
Ori: Would sounds not so certain like will, I think.
------------

Is it not possible that there are also people who are not so certain in situations such as this?
0 Replies
 
 

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